Sanding

Discussion in 'Newbie' started by Joe Buesgen, May 28, 2017.

  1. Joe Buesgen

    Joe Buesgen

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    I am using mineral oil and Staples clear wax mixture to reduce the sanding dust in the garage/shop. Other than putting several coats of bees wax , is there any other final finishes that can be used over those two substances for a great finish? Thanks for any input/ direction.
     
  2. Bill Boehme

    Bill Boehme Administrator Staff Member

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    Once you apply a wax to wood, you are basically limited to just applying more wax. Beeswax is OK, but carnauba was is more durable.
     
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  3. Joe Buesgen

    Joe Buesgen

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    I thought so but hoped there was an alternative unknown to me. Gotta use those items when sanding in my garage or it would be very bad for all the stuff stored there and my lungs. I don't can't afford a vacuum system. Thanks again.
     
  4. hockenbery

    hockenbery AAW Advisor Staff Member

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    @Joe Buesgen

    There are other wet sanding options.

    You can wet sand with water.

    I have wetsanded with Watco but it is messy - most wipe on finishes are compatible with Watco
     
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  5. odie

    odie

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    Joe......a cheap and effective way to keep the dust out of your lungs is the Resp-o-rator. This is what I've been using for the past 5+ years. it will filter as well as any of the motorized helmets. I have an Airstream helmet, and still prefer the Resp-o-rator, because it's so light, handy, and works! The only drawback, is it's like scuba diving in your shop!

    http://duxterity.com/resp-o-rator/


    View: https://youtu.be/XWNEmZMq4pY
     
  6. robo hippy

    robo hippy

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    If you are using a wax in your sanding, the penetration oils in solvent bases will work, like the Danish oil types. A surface spray will not stick to the wood because of the wax.

    If you don't have a dust collector, then your lungs become dust collectors..... You can find them on Craigs List some times... I have found wet sanding to be a bit of a pain, and don't care for it, but it does keep the dust down.

    robo hippy
     
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  7. Joe Buesgen

    Joe Buesgen

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    Thanks for all but my main concern is the dust in and around the garage...I am ok with my mask when used. Thanks. BTW,.great pics from Nam...my personal thanks to you for your service for all of us !!!!!!!!!!!!,
     
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  8. Zach LaPerriere

    Zach LaPerriere

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    Hi Joe,

    You might try walnut oil, which polymerizes (hardens over time) rather than mineral oil, which forever stays liquid. There are two common routes there. You could wet sand with walnut oil then use the Beall buffing system to put a carnauba wax on. Or a cheaper route initially would be to sand with straight walnut oil, then try the carnauba wax friction polish from Mike at Doctor's Woodshop. The idea behind the friction polish is that you apply it with a rag while your piece is turning on the lathe. The friction/heat created melts the carnauba which Mike has suspended in the walnut oil by some trick of chemistry.

    Good luck.
     
  9. Joe Buesgen

    Joe Buesgen

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    Whoa Zachary....like your advise !!!!! Thanks buddy.
     
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  10. Zach LaPerriere

    Zach LaPerriere

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    You're welcome Joe. Mike at the Doctor's Woodshop is a heck of a helpful guy and in my experience would only sell you what you need. Worth a call or email if you want to pursue that direction.
     
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  11. Peter D'Attomo

    Peter D'Attomo

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    Zack, at what point do you use the walnut oil, at 120, 240,??? Thanks
     
  12. Hy Tran

    Hy Tran

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    So I think I'm reading two separate questions here. One, you use mineral oil & beeswax; and two, you would like to reduce the amount of sanding dust generated, or to reduce effect of sanding dust landing on your work.

    At the coarser grits, I don't think sanding dust stays suspended in air that much. I've tried wet-sanding with walnut oil as a lubricant. I personally start at 280 or 320, because I found that at 120, 150, etc., my sandpaper clogged before I got my toolmarks removed. Dr Woodshop recommends starting walnut-oil-lubricated-sanding about 200 or so. I no longer wet-sand with walnut oil, but I have a dedicated dust collection (if I remember to turn it on :confused:).

    While DrWoodshop's friction polish probably contains wax (I'm not near my bottle of DWFP, so I can't tell you), "traditional" friction polishes are mixtures of dewaxed shellac, alcohol, and a polymerizing oil (such as Walnut oil or "boiled" linseed oil). The heat drives off the solvent (alcohol) and helps polymerize the polymerizing oil. I've used DWFP, and I really like it.

    Multiple coats of friction polish (with some amount of waiting) help deepen the shine, but don't really build up a perceptible film. If there is wax in the friction polish, I don't know how well additional layers would stick to the first layer.

    If you have patience and like a glossy (not just shiny, but outright glossy) finish, wipe-on-poly works pretty well. It does require many coats, and sufficient polymerizing time between coats (just enough time to be non-tacky, but not so much time that it's fully polymerized, unless you're willing to scuff and coat-on-top).

    My opinions :D
     

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