Seasoned logs

Discussion in 'Woodturning Discussion Forum' started by Fadi Zeidan, Sep 22, 2017.

  1. Owen Lowe

    Owen Lowe

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    My chapter does the same thing.

    I use Anchorseal frequently, however, for anyone using it to coat outdoor-stored wood, be aware that it does degrade over a month or two and the wood will begin to dry and crack the same as if it weren’t coated at all. In my opinion, all of the water/wax sealers are a short-term solution. When I have to buy myself extended time, I will double or triple coat with Anchorseal. Also, keep the wood away from direct sun and wind exposure.
     
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  2. Fadi Zeidan

    Fadi Zeidan

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    Thanks guys,

    These are great tips. I will do that and I’m sure I’ll make mistakes and learn from them.
     
  3. Dean Center

    Dean Center

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    Fadi,
    You can also put green blanks in a lawn and leaf sized plastic bag or wrap them in plastic film, and dramatically slow the drying process. Depending on your climate, you may need to use within a certain time frame or periodically open the bag to let the accumulated water out. In our dry climate, we don't have to do any messing. The plastic wrap is giant saran wrap made for moving and shipping and binding boards, and is now available in big box stores and stores with shipping supplies. We've had blanks wrapped or bagged for a year and when we take them out, they're about half dry and most still turn like green. Yes, you can grow some mold, but it generally is just on the outer surface and usually isn't associated with rot. In our dry climate. Your mileage may vary.
     
  4. john lucas

    john lucas

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    Anchorseal is a good product. I find to really seal the wood I have to put on 2 coats and if I want to coat both ends have to either lay it down or wait until the first coat dries to flip it over for the other end. When I use Wax I just dip one end, hold it up for about the count of 5, flip it over dip the other end and then put the wood away. Much faster than Anchorseal. Anchorseal if far better for logs because you never get mold underneath it which can happen occasionally with wax. It's just much slower to use, but then did you ever try to dip a 50lb log into molten wax. Not an easy thing to do so you grab the Anchorseal.
     
  5. Mike Johnson

    Mike Johnson

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    You can easily use a cheap wood handle natural bristle brush to apply hot melted wax
    onto wood log ends. Depending on the wood you usually need to brush several coats of wax
    onto the end grain as it will soak in the hot wax into the end grain readily. Dipping is by far the
    easiest way to seal wood billets but the bigger pieces usually require a brush.
     
  6. Bill Boehme

    Bill Boehme Administrator Staff Member

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    I paint both ends with Anchorseal at the same time just leaving the log horizontal. Sometimes I will apply a second coat a day or week later on wood that has large pores if I think that it needs it or sometimes I just want to use up the Anchorseal that I have in the coffee can and I will redo some wood whether it needs it or not. Because I'm sloppy, I get some drips of Anchorseal on the driveway, but in the hot Texas summer heat it just soaks into the concrete and disappears. (summer is from March to November :D)
     
  7. john lucas

    john lucas

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    My typical discipline probably varies from most. I tend to get longs when I have the least amount of time to process them. I will put garbage bags over the ends and if they are short enough stack them on the other end on the ground. That plastic falls apart pretty quick due to UV. I then wrap stretch wrap around the ends. That holds up quite a while. If possible I will try to get the logs off the ground and definitely cover them to keep wind and sun off. That usually gives me more like a year although i still have bug problems here in Tennessee. When I do get the time I cut them up into potential blanks and seal the end grain. For bowl blanks and hollow vessels I try to coat all end grain areas or if it's wood that checks easily I will try and coat the whole blank. That has worked for me. I don't do a lot of green wood turning so I have to spend a lot more time trying to save the wood than many people would.
     
  8. Owen Lowe

    Owen Lowe

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    Me too! Funny that.

    After I get logs I try to do the initial slicing and dicing pretty soon even though I may not get the wood on the lathe for a few days or weeks. I will often resort to plastic bags after I’ve rough sawn blanks before I can lug them into the shop to turn them. (I have a couple of those big, heavy-duty dust collector bags that have developed small holes.) I don’t like spending the $$ on Anchorseal or take the time to try to coat all the endgrain of octagonal pieces so make a stack of the blanks and slip a plastic bag over the top. Around these parts, for more than 1/2 of the year you don’t need any kind of slow-drying mechanism given the rain so this is only needed for the dryer months.
     
  9. Tom Albrecht

    Tom Albrecht

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    Bill, When you say "I used one for a while..." what are you referring to, the Trend Airshield, or what?
     
  10. Tom Albrecht

    Tom Albrecht

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    I purchased my Anchorseal direct in 5 gal pails. (For some crazy reason, they don't charge shipping for destinations east of the Mississippi). So the last time I ordered the gal says "What color do you want?" Turns out that you can get it a load of different colors, and I can tell you from experience, unless you need a color, don't do it. It stains driveways, clothes, shoes, whatever, permanently.
     
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  11. Leo Van Der Loo

    Leo Van Der Loo

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    Getting sealing and dividing or not logs, is something I have done for a long time already, buying and having it shipped is just not economic or even needed here in Ontario with all kinds of tree species.

    Yes there are trees that do not grow here, but that is so in every area on earth I believe.

    Free freshly cut logs are all around for free,, free wood is good :)

    If the logs aren’t too thick and heavy I will keep them as long as possible, I Anchor seal the ends, often again after it has dried up, and I would store them in my shop and then process them as fast as possible.
    log storage.jpg

    I’d be standing on a thick layer of shavings, only cleaning them out when done with the rough turning, all the rough turned pieces are stuck into a brown paper bag and set away in a cool draft free place, and checked a few times the first week or two, just to make sure there is no fungus growing on the wood.
    some in and some out of the bag.jpg

    Of course some of the wood I would have to parten up because of where it was or for the size of them, though I do like the larger logs, as I find the grain in them are usually nicer than the small logs.
    Black Walnut.jpg Rough cut blanks.jpg large logs.jpg

    On a ocasion or two I got so much wood that I could not rough that all in the next couple of days and in those times I would over the sealed wood also put a plastic bag, usually I would use some painters tape to get the bags tight over the logs.
    packed blog blanks.jpg

    And yes there was some of those logs that sat just too long, like about a year and they would split, even when sealed and wrapped in plastic, these get made into spindle blanks or smaller bowl blanks if they didn’t get into rotten wood, some wood will do that while other do not,
    Walnut sealed and plastic wrapped after one year.jpg
     
    Last edited: Oct 4, 2017
  12. Bill Boehme

    Bill Boehme Administrator Staff Member

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    I had quoted Emiliano's post about using a Dust-Bee-Gone rag. I stated that I used one also before I figured out how worthless they were.
     
  13. Bill Boehme

    Bill Boehme Administrator Staff Member

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    That's really interesting ... and good to know.
     
  14. robo hippy

    robo hippy

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    One cheap solution for end sealing was to use laytex paint and then while the paint is still wet, slap some plastic on the paint. Good cheap seal, and the paint keeps the paint from drying out.

    robo hippy
     

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