Serious lathe accidents and injurys.......a preventive idea

Discussion in 'Woodturning Health & Safety' started by odie, Oct 6, 2012.

  1. robo hippy

    robo hippy

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    Odie,

    I actually have a web site under construction. The only gallery shots I ever did are on my bowl coring DVD. I will let you know when it is up. I almost never critique. It is just an opinion.

    For me, when turning the outside of a bowl, I have the sliding headstock for that. Slide all the way down to the end and stand there so you don't have to lean over, or extend your arms like Stuart Batty does. You can also do a pull cut where you stand on the headstock side, extend minimally, still standing out of the line of fire. having the headstock on the end also works for turning out the inside. You just stand straight up, in front, and turn. It drives me crazy to see people with a sliding headstock turning bowls from the side.

    I do wear a face shield when turning spindles, which isn't often. You do have to stand pretty much in the line of fire, and there seems to be no way to get the chips out of your face, other than by using the face shield.

    robo hippy
     
    Last edited: Oct 8, 2012
  2. Malcolm Zander

    Malcolm Zander

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    Face shields and helmets

    On the day that Lynn Yamaguchi had her accident I was giving a rotation at the New Zealand symposium. The first thing I spoke about was safety equipment and in particular the setup I use. I also showed a slide of a piece of wood I was roughing out recently and found a large piece of barbed wire embedded in it, and asked the attendees how they would like to have this end up in their face.

    The setup I use is shown in the April 2010 (vol 25) issue of the American Woodturner, page 25, and I believe that a helmet arrangement like this answers many of the questions raised earlier as to good protection. I know that it looks weird and over the top, but it truly is comfortable, quiet, the air is at room temperature, and I can (and do) wear it all day without discomfort.

    Do take a look, folks, and give it some thought. The cost of the Triton plus the separate blower is substantial, but I view it as as essential as a good chuck or gouge and as an integral part of all my equipment. If you can afford a lathe you can afford good head protection. I have only one face and pair of eyes and they are not easy to replace.

    MZ
     
  3. Bill Boehme

    Bill Boehme Administrator Staff Member

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    I get my instructions before leaving the house on what I need to get. Somewhere between then and when I pick out a frame instructions might get confused a bit.

    Polycarbonate is much more impact resistant than any kind of optical glass used in glasses AFAIK. When you get glasses you need to tell them that you want safety glasses. The difference is that the lenses are much thicker and the frames besides not being exactly fashionable have to meet some safety requirements for ruggedness and also not allow the lens to pop out from the rear if impacted. I know that when I was working, I couldn't go into a hard hat area with regular glasses or ones with glass lenses unless also wearing goggles.

    Sorry to hear that you are still working. :D

    You can tell your optometrist or ophthalmologist what distance you would like for the mid range. If you don't say then they will assume about three feet. I told my ophthalmologist that I wanted mine to focus at about 22" since that is what I prefer for my large screen photo editing monitor and it works perfectly for me.

    Once you get adjusted to them, you never notice the transition, but at first I spent all of my time looking at the transitions in the glasses rather than what I was supposed to be looking at. Once I figured out what I was doing was not the same thing as what I should be doing, everything was fine.

    The one thing that does bug me about wearing glasses is lateral chromatic aberration which is a problem when trying to fix chromatic aberration in the periphery of images. Just in the nick of time, Adobe came up with a color fringe detecting algorithm for their raw converter software that works pretty well.
     
    Last edited: Oct 8, 2012
  4. Jim Livingston

    Jim Livingston

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    Last edited: Oct 9, 2012
  5. john lucas

    john lucas

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    If you buy transition lenses make sure you can take them back if they don't work. I bought some. I simply could not get used to them. It looked like I had a 2" circle in focus and had to move my head constantly to have the are in focus that I needed. I gave it 2 weeks and finally took them back. My boss and my secretary loved theirs. It just didn't work for me at all.
     
  6. Gretch Flo

    Gretch Flo

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    glasses

    My optometrist changed my focal length a few years ago to "avoid" computer stain. As my eyes changed, my arms weren't long enuf to comfortably read with these glasses , so I had her change the focal length and stronger magnification. So my old glasses are good, but not strong enuf for seeing the sanding scratches. So for years I have used bifocal safely glasses and just flip them on my head, and off and they cover my glasses. However thru the years they are pretty scratched and I need new ones. I have several other pairs of "nicer" looking ones, but don't fit my eyes/over glasses well with the bifocal part. I do not remember where I got the ones I like. Does anyone have some suggestions?? I have looked at all the catelogs I have and they don't have the over the glasses kind and more side protection. (BTW dust can get thru them when wearing this set up).
     

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  7. John Lawson

    John Lawson

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    If you have a grand to drop, there are always adjustable focus glasses ( http://www.superfocus.com/ ). While a nifty idea, they ugly enough to detract even from my looks.
     
  8. Bill Boehme

    Bill Boehme Administrator Staff Member

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    They are almost geeky enough for me to want them. :D They still need a band-aid on the nose bridge.

    Several yeas ago Canon had some cameras that used eye detection autofocus. It sensed eye motion to determine what you were looking at and then focused on that. It was a great idea, but not for that application unless you understood what the camera was trying to do and actually looked at what you wanted to be in the sharpest focus. In actuality, most users kept scanning around the scene, forcing the AF to try to follow the eye movements. In the end, the users were often unhappy that the camera couldn't figure out what the user intended to be in focus while their eyes wandered all over the place. Maybe it wasn't so great an idea for a camera, but it might be great for spectacles. It would at least get rid of the silly geeky slider over the nose bridge and replace it with something even geekier -- high tech, but still geeky. I will wait until you get your variable focus glasses, John, and if folks don't poke too much fun at you maybe I'll think about it.
     
  9. Robert Manning

    Robert Manning member

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    I asked my eye doctor about the reading glasses at the dollar store. She told me she has patients who wear those and they're not a problem. There is a guy in her office who sells $300 reading glasses and those are fine too.

    Then I told her I needed to see things up close and she simply told me to use glasses with a higher number.

    I bought a few pairs of different focal length and use them where appropriate.

    If each eye is different, then obviously custom glasses are required.

    FOR SAFETY, when diameter and speed increase, I wear a pair of ski type safety goggles and a respirator under a full face shield. I wear glasses under the goggles if needed. On the larger pieces especially, I stay out of the line of fire and fear the turning object. Fear is good.
     
  10. Jake_Debski

    Jake_Debski

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  11. Jim Livingston

    Jim Livingston

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    John:

    Just for the record - "Transition" is a term used to describe photochromic lenses that turn dark or change color when exposed to bright light, specifically UV from the sun (it is a registered brand name of Transitions Optical Company Inc). The lenses that you refer to are "Progressive" lenses that have a graduated reading add. And yes many people do not acclimate to them, especially if you have become accustomed to wearing conventional bifocals! It is equally true that many people do not tolerate the line in conventional bifocals and trifocals and prefer progressives, the moral is "all things are not for all people!" It is therefor advisable to seek out a knowledgeable professional that can sort through the options and is willing to back up their work!

    It is also true that a product that is safe for one activity may not be safe for others, which was my point to Odie about the hockey helmet. Most of these items are deemed safe "WHEN USED AS DIRECTED" when we attempt to re-purpose them we may unwittingly put ourselves at risk. [end of sermon]
     
  12. john lucas

    john lucas

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    You are correct. Sorry about that. I did try Progressives also. They were always dark when I wanted the lighter and vice/Versa. If the change was faster they would be great.
     
  13. Terry Martin

    Terry Martin

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    I also use an Airstream and about 12 years ago I was hit full in the face in similar circumstances with a half a block of burl that weighed around 20 KG. Apart from a stiff neck and a sore butt from landing on the floor, I sustained no injury and the helmet was unmarked. With that single incident it paid for itself a million times over as I am sure it would have killed me. I never turn big pieces without my helmet. It is now going on 25 years old and still going strong.
     
  14. Dale Jablonski

    Dale Jablonski

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    Still have to deal with the weight issue. Athletes are in good physical condition and typically do not have the helmets in an active posture for that long. Average hockey shift is 45 seconds and then they are resting except for the goaltender. Football players take theirs off when on sidelines. This is another consideration.
     
  15. odie

    odie

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    Gretch......I bought a pair of these 3x clip on magnifiers. They are pretty cheap and might work for you. They are similar to those clip on sunglasses you see everywhere....... They still don't filter out all the dust, and if that's your requirement, I don't see a solution, other than to get something that makes a seal.......goggles, maybe......or, something like one of the air filtration helmets.

    http://www.harborfreight.com/3x-clip-on-magnifiers-66825.html

    ooc
     
    Last edited: Oct 19, 2012
  16. odie

    odie

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    Instead of mounting a face shield to the front of the helmet cage, I tried a pair of over-the-glasses safety glasses tonight. This worked decently. The hockey helmet is only going to be used occasionally........for those times where I anticipate, or foresee a reasonable "threat level". There have been times in the past when the "threat level" has been a real concern........now, I feel much safer to know I have this option.......

    Most of the time, my face shield is the preferred protection. Sometimes I use the Airstream.

    I'm one who thinks some people really go overboard, and has every conceivable problem covered by some restrictive safety device. The consideration is somewhere within what is a reasonable threat level, and what is a remote threat level........We just have to weigh the possibilities against the risks........sometimes the risks are low, and other times the risks are......well, more risky! How each individual will evaluate the circumstances is definitely not the same! :eek:

    ooc
     
    Last edited: Oct 19, 2012
  17. Gretch Flo

    Gretch Flo

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    clip ons

    Thanks Odie-good tip. No the dust is not an issue. Will keep in mind when I go to HF the next time, Gretch
     
  18. Gretch Flo

    Gretch Flo

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    reasonable risk protection

    I'm with you on this Odie. I sarcastically replied on a thread here a few years ago "Kevlar next" for body protection. ;)
    Gretch
     
  19. MichaelMouse

    MichaelMouse

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  20. Gretch Flo

    Gretch Flo

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