Setscrew in chuck to hold chuck on spindle?

Discussion in 'Newbie' started by Jesse Tutterrow, Oct 31, 2017.

  1. Jesse Tutterrow

    Jesse Tutterrow

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    Most (all?) scroll chucks come with a setscrew that secures the chuck to the spindle. This seems necessary only if the lathe is in reverse since forward direction continually tightens the chuck.

    I bought a new adaptor for my old Nova Scroll chuck and it came with a setscrew. I also ordered a new SuperNova2 chuck and adaptor. This adaptor did not come with a set screw. I have been corresponding with John from Teknatool about the missing setscrew. He has now mentioned that I need a fiber washer between the adaptor and the spindle.

    The adaptor screws completely on and contacts the flat surface of the spindle to the left of the threads. If I tighten down the setscrew it marrs the left side of the last thread (towards the headstock).

    This raises the following questions:
    1. Am I correct in the assumption that a chuck does not need the setscrew unless spinning in reverse?
    2. Could I use my leather punch and an old belt to make my own washers?
    3. How many of you use the setscrew in forward or reverse?
    4. How many of you use the fiber washer?
    It seems like the fiber washer would be easy to loose.

    Thanks in Advance
     
  2. hockenbery

    hockenbery AAW Advisor Staff Member

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    I just use the set screw when I reverse.
    I do not use washers.

    If your lathe controller has a brake programmed it is possible the sudden breaking with a large blank can unwind the chuck. I have never had this problem but my lathe brakes slowly. I have heard of a few instances but It may be due to not tightening the chuck onto the spindle well rather than the hard breaking allowing the momentum of the piece to unscrew the chuck.
     
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  3. Jesse Tutterrow

    Jesse Tutterrow

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    You raise a good point that I did not think about. My Grizzly lathe (G0766) does not advertise a break and it takes a while to coast to zero speed.
     
  4. Bill Boehme

    Bill Boehme Administrator Staff Member

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    1. You are correct.
    2. No. That is far thicker than the fiber washer which is approximately 1/32" thick. Besides, I don't agree with JFT (John from Technitool) about using a fiber, plastic, or any other washer. I don't own any Nova chucks, but the metal to metal contact is what provides precision registration between the spindle and the chuck. Inserting anything between them, especially something compressible, doesn't make sense to me.
    3. I don't use a setscrew, but it depends on what you are doing. If you have a very heavy piece mounted and you hit the stop button, the momentum could cause it to unscrew. If your lathe has electronic speed control, the solution would be to let it freewheel to a stop rather than the programmed ramp-down. I only sand in reverse and use light pressure. Starting in reverse should be done by gradually increasing speed.
    4. Not me!
     
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  5. Bill Boehme

    Bill Boehme Administrator Staff Member

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    One more thought ... there are many kinds of setscrews. Most hardware stores only sell one kind ... the type that has a sharp cupped tip meant to dig into the metal because that type is meant for permanent fixing of one part to another. There are far better setscrews with rounded tips that won't grunge up the spindle.

    Check out McMaster-Carr to see various options. The dog point or non-marring tip setscrews would be better choices.
     
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  6. odie

    odie

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    You can also cut a piece of brass (example: brazing rod, or brass screw) and put it between the set screw and the spindle threads. It will grip, but won't damage the spindle threads.

    -----odie-----
     
  7. William Rogers

    William Rogers

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    I would never use a washer for all the reasons Bill stated. IMO they cause more problems then they solve.
    1 Yes
    2 Don't need
    3 never in forward. I only sand in reverse and don't use one. If I was to turn in reverse I would use one.
    4 Never used a washer. I do use never seize on my spindle threads. Some believe the use of a spindle washer prevents the chuck from getting stuck on the spindle. If you have properly machined and lubed spindle threads you won't get the chuck stuck.
     
  8. john lucas

    john lucas

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    None of my chucks have a sets screw. In all the years I've been turning I have had a bowl come loose one time. It was about 19" and the electronic breaking was rapid enough the chuck came unscrewed. What I do now is to put the chuck on, then tighten it using my chuck key. I have never had it come loose since doing that. I bought one of the Nylon washers years ago. Thought I needed it. I have not used it in probably 10 years. The only reason you might need one is if your chuck gets so tight you can't get it loose. Don't snap the chuck on, this can cuase that. Just put the chuck on snug by hand, then tighten it a little further with the chuck key and it always comes off with about the same amount of pressure. I turn my hand mirrors in reverse. don't need a set screw even then using my chuck tightening scenario. If I was doing a large bowl I would probably consider a set screw but then again non of my chucks has one.
     
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  9. John Torchick

    John Torchick

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    I had a problem with the retaining nut on my reloader. I put a #5 shot in the hole and tightened the set screw down. The lead conformed to the threads and stays in place. On the chuck, the shot fell out when I took the chuck off the lathe. Back to the drawing board!
    The previous posts are food for thought.
     
  10. stu senator

    stu senator

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    I have used set screws with a brass tip set in to the tip. At the moment I don't remember where I got them.
    I found some samples of small sizes (#6) in my junk. They were called GiB set screws and were brass with a nylon tip. I also purchased some from Pic Design a company that made various gears and other parts. I don't know the status of the company but they were sold and moved years ago.

    Some one may still make them, it may just require a search.

    Just did that and found the Lexington Co sells them in sizes that could be used.

    Stu
     
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  11. john lucas

    john lucas

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  12. Gerald Lawrence

    Gerald Lawrence

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    Bill the set screw that comes with the Nova Chucks is the sharp type and I learned the hard way about the damage they can do to threads. All my chucks have a set screw but only some of my Nova adapters have one. I use the nylon washer because when I started turning I got the chuck stuck a couple times before I learned "do not start lathe until the chuck is seated".
     
  13. Bill Boehme

    Bill Boehme Administrator Staff Member

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    Now, that is a very good way to make sure that the chuck is nice and tight. :D I've done that trick a time or two with my old Reeves drive lathe ... usually it was when I noticed too late that the speed lever was at max and I was too lazy to remove the chuck before cranking the speed down.

    Some lathe spindles have tighter thread clearance than others. The spindle threads on my old Delta was more than a bit undersized so chucks went on really loose and didn't straighten up until mated to the registration face. My Jet mini was a step better. And, on my Robust AB, chucks thread on very smoothly. Years ago, I always gave chucks a forceful twist to seat it on the spindle. Now, I just use a flick of the wrist which is more than necessary for what I do. By the time that I remove the chuck it is seated solidly enough that I lock the spindle and give the chuck a quick jerk using the chuck key (Stronghold & Talon) or tommy bar (Vicmarc).

    It's been some years since I had a chuck really tight, but when I was a beginner and getting frequent whopper catches there were a few instances where a really long cheater bar came in handy. :eek:
     
  14. Fadi Zeidan

    Fadi Zeidan

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    I had a chuck come lose while hollowing twice. Had to tighten the set screws. Couldn’t figure out why it was happening, my best guess is that my hollowing was slowing down the piece but not the lathe so it was unscrewing. I use Delta 46-460 and Vicmarc chuck.
     
  15. Bill Boehme

    Bill Boehme Administrator Staff Member

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    That should cause the chuck to tighten unless you were hollowing in reverse (which sometimes has its advantages).

    Question: When standing at the tailstock end of the lathe and looking towards the spindle, which way was it turning, clockwise or counterclockwise?

    The spindle adapters on Vicmarc chucks don't come with threaded setscrew holes unless you or somebody else made the mod.
     
  16. Fadi Zeidan

    Fadi Zeidan

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    That was what I thought, it should tighten but it was spinning in the right direction and I was hollowing just fine for a while then it started to wobble. Maybe I touched the rim at the opposite side and slowed the wood down without noticing? I was using 3/4 bar in 1” 5/8th hole down 6 to 8” deep.
     
  17. Mike Johnson

    Mike Johnson

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    I always use an 1/8" polymer washer between my bowl chucks and the head stock spindle.
    One good catch while roughing out a bowl can lock the bowl chuck thread onto the
    spindle thread and makes for a difficult task to remove the bowl chuck later on if you
    do not have a washer installed on the spindle. I learned this lesson many years ago
    and have adopted this practice when installing adjustable chucks on the wood lathe.
    You can quickly and easily turn a washer from any polymer plastic on the wood lathe.
    I turned a couple of these from some thin Corian material about ten years ago and they
    are still in use today.
     
  18. Fadi Zeidan

    Fadi Zeidan

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    I had one get jammed bad and I struggled to get it off when I first started turning, that was when I started using the washer. I believe it was Lyle Jamieson who said not to use them to make sure the chuck seats well so I recently stopped.
     
  19. Bill Boehme

    Bill Boehme Administrator Staff Member

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    Possibly if the hollowing cutter was below center that could set up a strong vibration in the wood. The resulting chattering with the tip skipping along the inside alternating between grabbing the wood and free spinning could possibly be the cause. As you hollow deeper it would be good to verify that the tip is still above center. If the boring bar is angled downhill slightly that could be the reason that the tip is getting lower the deeper you hollow.
     
  20. odie

    odie

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    Could have it come loose as you shut down?
     

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