Shop Air Filtration

Discussion in 'Woodturning Health & Safety' started by Lamar Wright, Sep 18, 2017.

  1. Lamar Wright

    Lamar Wright

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    Hello Turners, I have a small basement (12x15) shop and when I was turning just pens I did not need anything more than my Jet dust collector with a bag and a 5 micron top filter. Now that I'm turning bowls, plates, platters ect. I am generating a lot more fine dust mainly on kiln dried wood. I have decided to invest in a air filtration system and I'm looking at a Jet 1000cfm system or a Wen 3410 air system with 300,350 and 400cfm. Both systems have high marks on reviews. Both systems have 3 speed settings with remote and timer. The Jet is $377.00 and the Wen is $122.00.

    In your opinion with my shop size witch system do you think would serve me best? In advance, I appreciate all your valued opinions and will consider each and everyone of them. Happy turning!
     
  2. Bernie Hrytzak

    Bernie Hrytzak

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    You should look into dust collection rather than air filtration, as air filter systems swirl the air around while you work and you breathe it in as it is cleaning. I have a dust cleaner ceiling mounted and it gets turned on when I leave the shop. The dust collector is on whenever I turn dry wood, and especially during sanding. I also wear a respirator when sanding.
    Ckeck out : https://www.oneida-air.com/
    Dust collector should be 1 micron or less capability.
    Personal dust protection in keeping your lungs healthy should be a top priority in the shop.
     
  3. Owen Lowe

    Owen Lowe

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    I have a slightly smaller basement turnery, maybe 10x12. It’s a room that can be closed to the rest of the basement. Eliminating as much fine dust is the goal as we have other living space activities in the basement. I agree with Bernie that a 1 micron filter on your dust collector would be your first step. As a second step add an air filtration unit. I have a JDS unit that appears to be like this current model: http://jdstools.com/product/air-tech-hp-2/.

    Using both seems to do the job pretty well though there is some dust that settles on the shelves in the main part of the basement.
     
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  4. Andy Chen

    Andy Chen

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    I 100% agree with Bernie, Lamar. You are between the work and the filter and your lungs do the filtration first! I have a home-made cyclone dust collector (Wood Magazine, November 1997) and there is a 6" x 12" dust port directly behind the turning piece. I also wear a 3M Airstream AS-400 which has a HEPA filter (0.3 micrometer filter) and a face shield. It is obscenely expensive but how much are your lungs worth? I have recently learned about a similar product, JSP Power Cap (http://www.toolpost.co.uk/pages/Health___Safety/Respirators/respirators.html) that costs much less and is a one-piece unit (as opposed to the AS-400's separate battery pack). However, it uses British (or European) safety standards. I don't know what the particle exclusion rating is.
     
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  5. Bill Boehme

    Bill Boehme Administrator Staff Member

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    I agree with Bernie and Andy. Don't let your lungs be the first stage of filtration in cleaning the air. Five microns is rather useless as far as your health is concerned. The hazardous dust is too fine to be seen .. less than one micron. I also use a 3M Airstream AS400 and my lungs thank me for it.

    A ceiling mounted air cleaner is too far from the source to be of any real value other than helping to keep the shop clean. You really need to collect the dust within a few inches of the source.
     
  6. john lucas

    john lucas

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    If you click on that add for the tool post repirator you will see how to keep shavings off your clothes, don't wear any. :)
     
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  7. Bill Boehme

    Bill Boehme Administrator Staff Member

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    I don't know, John ... I roll my lathe outside on the driveway when I turn. :D
     
  8. Lamar Wright

    Lamar Wright

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    lol !!
     
  9. Lamar Wright

    Lamar Wright

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    I went back and checked the air filtration on my jet dust collector and the top filter filters to 1.5 micron not 5. Mine is the type that has the turn handle on top of the filter. I forgot to mention my personal respirator, it is a North 7700 Series Half Mask and is NIOSH/MSHA approved and protects against dusts, mists,and vapors to less than 1 micron. The type that has the easy replaceable filters and cartridges. It also has replaceable inhale and exhale valves. Do you wear your masks when turning as well as sanding?
     
  10. Bill Boehme

    Bill Boehme Administrator Staff Member

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    Dust gets generated when turning so wear your mask whenever you're generating dust.
     
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  11. Lamar Wright

    Lamar Wright

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    Thanks Bill, I'll be sure to put on my mask and shield when I,m at the lathe or any other dust making machine.
     
  12. Richard Coers

    Richard Coers

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    You are way ahead of the game to collect the dust at the source. Letting it float around the shop and then try to catch it is extremely difficult. You are breathing it on the way to the filter, and it's settling out on everything else on the way to the filter as well. Those things don't suck the dust from a great distance. First spend your money on shrouding. Add a couple more pickup points that can be moved around the work to collect it right off the sandpaper. It's my opinion you get what you pay for. I'd question the air flow data on the cheap unit. Because who measures it, right?
     
  13. Lamar Wright

    Lamar Wright

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    Good thought Richard, thanks so much. Happy Turning!
     
  14. Gerald Lawrence

    Gerald Lawrence

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    I agree with most comments. Use the DC at the point of generation and personal protection ,I use the trend airshield. Now where I disagree. The air filtration unit is to clean the air of dust , and you WILL have some no matter what other methods you use, that is missed by other methods. Why in the world would you want to wait till you leave the shop to turn on air filtration? My shop is 24 X 36 and I recently added a Jet 1000 and love it.
     
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  15. Richard Coers

    Richard Coers

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    [QUOTE="Gerald Lawrence, post: 127048, member: 20956". Now where I disagree. The air filtration unit is to clean the air of dust , and you WILL have some no matter what other methods you use, that is missed by other methods. Why in the world would you want to wait till you leave the shop to turn on air filtration? My shop is 24 X 36 and I recently added a Jet 1000 and love it.[/QUOTE]

    What isn't mentioned about these ceiling mounted air filters, is that they knock about as much dust out of the air as they collect. For an experiment, just hang a box fan from the ceiling. You will get an air flow that forces the fine dust out of suspension. Of course you will get dust in the bags of the commercial filter, but I'm not sure what percentage. Before you could buy these units, I made a similar system from a box fan with a wooden box on the back. It held two furnace filters in a V configuration. It did a wonderful job of removing air borne dust. Of course from the air flow and a couple of filters.
     
  16. Bernie Hrytzak

    Bernie Hrytzak

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    Because if you turn on the filtration unit while in the shop without wearing a mask, your lungs and the filtration unit will be both cleaning the airborne dust at the same time.
     
  17. Lamar Wright

    Lamar Wright

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    Like Bill Boehme stated, when ever you are creating dust whether turning, sanding, or what ever you should be wearing your personal protection mask. I agree with Gerald Lawrence that the air filtration system is just another step in cleaning the air in your shop.
     
  18. William Rogers

    William Rogers

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    H
    Bernie, I guess I don't agree/ understand your reasoning regarding the air filtration unit. I have mine on while in the shop. Just walking through the shop you stir up dust. So if you don't turn it on only you will be cleaning the air? My filtration unit is mounted about 10' (ceiling is 12'). It's not stirring up new dust, only getting what is already in the air. I see no reason not to use it while in the shop. I agree with others about collection at the source, but while turning impossible to do effectively. I have a big gulp I can position that I run while turning and sanding. I use the N95 masks. No doubt the Trend is better, but this is what I use. Th big gulp does great for sanding but not a whole lot when turning, but I still run it. I have a 3hp cyclone and I am fortunate to be able to vent outside so no loss due to filter clogging. I will build a second air filtration system using a furnace blower when I make some time to do that. I think the air filtration systems are an added benefit, but not meant to be a prime collection unit.
    Ok just had a 3.8 earthquake! I guess I'll go to the shop and turn the filtration on to collect the stirred up dust.
     
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  19. Bernie Hrytzak

    Bernie Hrytzak

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    I wear a mask while raising a lot of dust turning or sanding, along with the dust collector going as well. After I am finished that stage, I like to turn on the air filtration system to remove dust that might settle on surfaces, rather than continue wearing a mask, I simply leave the area for 2 hours to do something else. While turning, I might have the following machines on : lathe , vacuum pump , dust collector. radio, so avoiding one extra noise maker such as the General Air Purifier by leaving it off until later. And.... then the phone rings! This is what works for me. :)
     
  20. John Torchick

    John Torchick

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    You don't need a filtration system. Just breathe deeply whenever you are in the shop. Shuffle your feet to help stir up the dust. Eventually, all the dust will disappear. Make sure you have a good pulmonologist on call. o_O
    I use a Shop Vac which doesn't do a great job with the Dust Deputy. I would love to have a DC but space and $$$ limit me greatly. The SV will get a decent portion of the dust on the BS, TS outlet in the back but not at the blade, and DP. Not good for chips off the lathe as it doesn't have the suction needed. I do make it a point to regularly vacuum the floor and my power tools. I need to clean off some shelves that need it rather badly.
    I do turn on a box fan with furnace filter- surprising how much dust it does remove.
     
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