shop floor

Discussion in 'Woodturning Discussion Forum' started by Robert Feingold, Sep 19, 2017.

  1. Robert Feingold

    Robert Feingold

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    I have a new plywood sub-floor in my shop and am looking for a floor material suggestion. I'd prefer 3/4" solid wood but prefinished wood flooring seems like it would be slippery. Any comments on unfinished wood? id like a light color like oak or maple.
    Its about 75 sq ft.
    Any suggestions?
    Thanks,
    Rob
     
  2. Bernie Hrytzak

    Bernie Hrytzak

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    I used 3/4 inch chipboard in my shop, and then painted it with : Supergrip Epoxy fortified acrylic enamel which I purchased at a lumber store.
    It is a non-skid satin finish in a tan color, and is resistant to oil and gas. Some type of plywood or solid wood flooring painted with this might give you a good surface. ( I have repainted once in 15 years)
     
  3. stu senator

    stu senator

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    If you go for paint use a nonslip additive. I got a can, it is a powder, at I think Sherwin Williams and it was in the range of $10.00.

    I used it in a 2 part epoxy on a concrete floor, not on wood but the nonslip I think is important.

    Stu
     
  4. Dennis J Gooding

    Dennis J Gooding

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    Just don't use anything that you will worry about getting dinged by a dropped tool or heavy object, because it WILL happen. I have a 4' x 4' rubber pad under my lathe. It has saved many a cutting tool, is non-skid and is comfortable to stand on for long periods.
     
  5. Bill Boehme

    Bill Boehme Administrator Staff Member

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    I think that unfinished oak would be a great shop flooring material, but I agree with Dennis that a good rubber mat would be great for your feet and back as well as dropped tools.
     
  6. Bruce Schoenleber

    Bruce Schoenleber

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    My last house, built in 1959 had 3/4" X 2" pecan floors which I sanded and refinished. It was beautiful, as would be oak or maple. Kind of too nice for a shop floor though. Somewhat like putting a brass knocker on a pine outhouse... Why not just plank it with 3/4 doug fir or southern yellow pine, depending on which side of the country you are getting it from. I don't think I would bother painting it, perhaps hit it with a coat of BLO which would be easy to replenish every couple of years.
     
  7. Mark Wollschlager

    Mark Wollschlager

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    If you make it too non-skid, it might be harder to sweep up. Think sweeping up shavings on sandpaper.
     
  8. stu senator

    stu senator

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    [QUOTE If you make it too non-skid, it might be harder to sweep up. Think sweeping up shavings on sandpaper.[/QUOTE]

    The particles in the additive are smaller then then the paint film thickness so only the tops of some stick thru.

    I used about double the recommended amount and have no trouble. I did not use a clear coat on top of the epoxy as that would defeat the purpose of the finish., but I did use the colored flakes provided.

    I painted a concrete garage floor that was was not finished to a super smooth surface and as the epoxy cured it filled in some of the grooves in the cement. The epoxy sweeps up better then the concrete.

    Stu
     
  9. Tom Albrecht

    Tom Albrecht

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    Any kind of wood floor will be easier on your feet and legs, as well as the inevitable dropped tools.
    I taught Ind Arts in schools and the wood floors were great, unlike the cement floor in my home shop.
     
    Last edited: Sep 19, 2017
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  10. John Torchick

    John Torchick

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    My shop floor which was the garage is finished concrete . Several years ago, I closed it off to keep sawdust from going everywhere. I never thought of finishing it with anything. I do have cushioned mats at each work area.
     
  11. Zach LaPerriere

    Zach LaPerriere

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    Another vote here for wood. Painted, finished or not is your choice. Mine are Alaska yellow cedar—a cypress, which is fairly soft. I left them roughsawn and they've worn just a little and they're as non-slip as anything.

    I like your idea of lighter colored wood. Oak might not be the best choice if you do a lot of rough turning wet wood, since oak tends to stain dark with water.
     
  12. JeffSmith

    JeffSmith

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    I've been researching the same issue - new shop, need to put in flooring. So far, I'm happy with the 1-1/4 plywood thats there, but found my cheapest wood option to be pine flooring - looking at lumber liquidators. I'm thinking that it's soft enough to provide a little relief for the feet, and only requires a simple finish like Thompsons waterseal (it is a shop floor afterall).
    Is there something I'm not considering?
     
  13. Tom Albrecht

    Tom Albrecht

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    I'll vote for that option.
     
  14. robo hippy

    robo hippy

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    I am getting ready to build a new shop. The lathe room will be concrete floor with pads around the lathes. The flat work room will be calico hickory, and it may or may not get a finish on it. Floor joists on 16 inch centers rather than 2 foot centers, then 7/8 plywood on that. Main reason to finish would be to prevent as much movement with weather changes, not to protect the surface. I had thought about some of the laminate flooring. Most of them have grooves rather than flush edges which could provide areas that will fill with dust. Since they are padded on the under side, that may add some wobble to the lathe.

    robo hippy
     
  15. stu senator

    stu senator

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    On a wood floor with no finish when (not if) you spill something it will soak in and stain the floor. If this is OK, then OK.

    Stu
     
  16. Robert Feingold

    Robert Feingold

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    I found some tongue and groove 5" wide premium white oak flooring that was an over run for $2 a sq ft. 8-10' long. Cant do better than that. I do however like the idea of a softer wood like pine.
    Ill put a penetrating finish on so it wont be slippery and it doesn't stain from wet wood. I'm thinking about running it through my wide belt sander and prefinishing it before i install for ease but worried some edges will stick up. i could create a micro bevel which may mitigate. any thoughts?
    Thanks for the helpful reply's.
    Rob
     
  17. Tom Albrecht

    Tom Albrecht

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    White oak is great for flooring (and furniture). I have use it for both and I've build exterior foot bridges using it without any coating or protection.
    I'd sand it and finish it after the install-- micro bevels means micro dust collectors.
     
    Last edited: Sep 22, 2017
  18. Bill Boehme

    Bill Boehme Administrator Staff Member

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    An oak floor won't be slippery. A wood floor is normally sanded after installation ... doing it beforehand is a waste of time because the reference datum is the tongue and groove joint ... unfortunately your belt sander uses the other face as its reference datum.

    A dropped tool wouldn't notice the difference in hardness of oak and pine. Oak is more stable and less likely to cup.

    A penetrating finish such as an oil or sealer isn't going to do much about protecting the floor from stains (dropped can of paint or bottle of dye or glue or metallic dust from the grinder for example). A polyurethane floor varnish would give better protection.

    Personally, I like the patina that a bare shop floor develops over time. Every stain has a story to tell.
     
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  19. robo hippy

    robo hippy

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    Pine, like Doug Fir, doesn't wear well. Any walk way, or glides other than felt, on the bottom of chairs, or stilletto high heels will leave marks and worn in trails. Sanded after you put it down for sure, and I have seen many before they were sanded. Even if you were milling all the boards yourself, not even suggested from me.

    robo hippy
     
  20. RichColvin

    RichColvin

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    I'd opt for cork. That way I'd have less resharpening when I drop tools !
     

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