Shop Humidity

Discussion in 'Newbie' started by Dave Fritz, Sep 29, 2016.

  1. Jamie Straw

    Jamie Straw

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    Heating with one of those propane torpedo heaters might raise the humidity.:eek:
     
  2. robo hippy

    robo hippy

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    Heaters lower the humidity level. When I visit family over Christmas (St. Joe, MO where the Pony Express began and Jesse James ended, or just north of KC) Dad has a humidifier going. Still get lots of static shocks. Here in western Oregon, humidity levels can be 90% for days on end, and almost never any static electric charges from walking across the rug. I some times use a cheap humidifier because I heat with a wood stove, and that dries every thing out in the house. More difficult to do in the wood shop with a small electric heater.

    robo hippy
     
  3. Jamie Straw

    Jamie Straw

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    My understanding has been that if the combustion isn't vented (e.g., torpedo heater, typical kerosene heater), humidity is increased. If the heater is vented outside, then humidity would be decreased. That's why I don't use our kerosene heater, even though it would come in handle on these slightly chilly, but not cold, days. When I use the pellet stove, it does dry out the air -- thankfully!
     
    Last edited: Oct 5, 2016
  4. Bill Boehme

    Bill Boehme Administrator Staff Member

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    The amount of moisture added isn't significant. Much more significant is the amount of additional moisture that warmer air can hold before it is saturated. The important factor to keep in mind is that we are talking about relative humidity. The word relative refers to the amount of water vapor present at a given temperature.compared to how much water vapor the air can hold at that temperature before it is saturated. Here is a link that helps to explain it: http://hyperphysics.phy-astr.gsu.edu/hbase/kinetic/relhum.html

    Of greater concern in using an unvented heater is the decrease in oxygen and increase in carbon monoxide.
     
  5. robo hippy

    robo hippy

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    If you take a cold shop and take a humidity reading, then heat the shop and take another reading, the relative humidity should go down because hot/warm air will hold more water than colder air where it will condense. Amount of water in the air stays the same.

    robo hippy
     
  6. Bill Boehme

    Bill Boehme Administrator Staff Member

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    I don't know about you folks "up nawth", but it is still hot here in Texas. I have the air conditioner running in the shop 24/7 ... the humidity and mosquitoes are keeping me indoors. Once upon a time, mosquito bites were just a nuisance, but now they can be serious.
     
  7. Jamie Straw

    Jamie Straw

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    Substitute dioxide for monoxide and we get what I was suffering from with my old respirator.:eek: To the point, my shop is so drafty right now that using a kerosene heater wouldn't make me pass out, or even get a headache. Once we get the attic ladder installed in the ceiling, and plug up a few other spaces, it'll be better, but never air-tight.
     
  8. Bill Boehme

    Bill Boehme Administrator Staff Member

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    Which respirator was that? Sounds like it might have been a Triton.
     
  9. Jamie Straw

    Jamie Straw

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    Actually, my Triton power respirator is great. Naw, this was a North CFR "particulate respirator" - half-face mask with replaceable filters. It was awful, in terms of exhausting air and moisture. I now have a 3M 6200 model, selected with help from this forum. I love it. I only wear the Triton when I'm turning dry bowls.
     

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