Sizing Ferrules for homemade handles

Discussion in 'Newbie' started by Jesse Tutterrow, Jun 22, 2017.

Tags:
  1. Jesse Tutterrow

    Jesse Tutterrow

    Joined:
    May 5, 2017
    Messages:
    23
    Location:
    Saint Louis, Missouri, USA
    I would like to turn handles for my tools instead of buying tools with handles.

    I have just received the Sorby 3/8 spindle gouge and am searching the Internet to find a rule-of-thumb as to what size ferrule I should use. Is there a standard as to tool diameter to ferrule diameter?
     
  2. Owen Lowe

    Owen Lowe

    Joined:
    Oct 25, 2005
    Messages:
    703
    Location:
    Newberg, OR: 20mi SW of Portland: AAW #21058
    My own “rule” in this instance would be to have at least 1/4” of wood around the shaft and fit the ferrule to that. So, a 3/8” shaft would require something like 7/8” or 1” ferrule inside diameter.
     
    taxman likes this.
  3. Bob Mezzatesta

    Bob Mezzatesta

    Joined:
    Sep 13, 2014
    Messages:
    8
    Location:
    Ontario, Canada
    I use Pex brass PEX fittings with end cut off. I believe they come in two sizes. I epoxy the tool and the ferrule. Haven't budged yet.
     
  4. Bob Mezzatesta

    Bob Mezzatesta

    Joined:
    Sep 13, 2014
    Messages:
    8
    Location:
    Ontario, Canada
    image.jpeg A picture is worth many words.
     
  5. Bill Boehme

    Bill Boehme Administrator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Jan 27, 2005
    Messages:
    8,122
    Location:
    Dalworthington Gardens, TX
    Home Page:
    Welcome to the AAW forum, Jesse. I. Think that Owen's rule is a good rule of thumb.

    I have a ½" Sorby bowl gouge (5/8" actual diameter) which has a one-inch ferrules which is barely more than ⅛" wood around the tool shank. I have several Crown bowl gouges of different sizes and they all have 1 1/4" ferrules. For the tool handles that I have made, I usually aim for 1/4" of wood support, but depends on my stash of brass pipe nipples and other plumbing fittings.

    There aren't any hard rules about handle design. It's mainly about ergonomics, using sound wood, and a good solid connection to the tool shank that goes at least two inches into the handle. As long as a bowl gouge is being used properly, there is very little bending moment force between the handle and tool shank. I've used bowl gouges sans handle just to show that is can be done although ergonomically it's not too great. The"catch" in all this would be that the connection between handle and tool needs to be catch proof if you are still experiencing occasional catches.
     
  6. Mike Johnson

    Mike Johnson

    Joined:
    Jul 26, 2016
    Messages:
    615
    Location:
    Nebraska
    Copper tubing is a quick and easy material to use for tool handle ferrules.
    You can also use the copper couplings which will be larger then the tubing.
    1/2" , 3/4" and 1" tubing and couplings gives you a large range of ferrules to choose from.
    Aluminum and Brass are other good materials to use for ferrules, easy to machine.
     
  7. Gerald Lawrence

    Gerald Lawrence

    Joined:
    Feb 6, 2010
    Messages:
    718
    Location:
    Brandon, MS
    I have not measured but the handles I have made not counting scrapers are for 3/8 or smaller and I think I used 1 1/4 copper tubing or fittings. The reason for the ferel is to add extra support for the wood at the point of stress. The main support for the tool is in my opinion farther back into the handle. In a catastrophic catch situation the 1/8 in more of wood will not make much difference.
     
  8. john lucas

    john lucas

    Joined:
    Apr 26, 2004
    Messages:
    5,822
    Location:
    Cookeville TN USA
    I sure thought I had a photo showing ferrule material but could not find it. I use copper pipe, Copper end caps, brass lamp tubing you can get from Lowes lighting department, Brass hex fittings from the plumbing department ( I simply turn away the hex to get it round and the screw threads inside really hold) Aluminum tubing, and even string lashed around it and coated with epoxy or CA glue. Size is dependant on the size of the handle and what fittings I have. I don't know that there is a rule other than to have the steel fare enough into the wood to keep from breaking. The ferrule just keeps the wood from splitting. Glued on tubing will eventually fall of from wood movement which is why I prefer the screw on brass fittings. I simply turn the wood down to a diameter that lets me thread the hex nut on. Then glue it in place and turn it to whatever shape I want. YOu can also use screw clamps if you want a removeable handle.
    YOu can see some of my homemade handles and ferrules in the skew photo.
     

    Attached Files:

  9. Mike Johnson

    Mike Johnson

    Joined:
    Jul 26, 2016
    Messages:
    615
    Location:
    Nebraska
    A small indent in the ferrule will usually keep it secured to the handle.
    A center punch can be used to create an indent into the ferrule.
    A hydraulic crimping tool can be used on an older tool where the ferrule is getting loose.
     
  10. Bill Boehme

    Bill Boehme Administrator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Jan 27, 2005
    Messages:
    8,122
    Location:
    Dalworthington Gardens, TX
    Home Page:
    The one in the second picture, John ... looks like it would be really handy when hollowing an Escheresque form.
     
    taxman likes this.
  11. Jesse Tutterrow

    Jesse Tutterrow

    Joined:
    May 5, 2017
    Messages:
    23
    Location:
    Saint Louis, Missouri, USA
    Thank all of you for your replies.

    Until I get more experience I will go with Owen's rule of 1/4 inch wood between the tool shaft and the ferrule.

    --Jesse.
     
  12. john lucas

    john lucas

    Joined:
    Apr 26, 2004
    Messages:
    5,822
    Location:
    Cookeville TN USA
    I usually extend a tool at least 2" into the handle. The Ferrules are usually around an inch long. When I use the sweat pipe to thread brass nuts I have very little wood around the tip but much more near the back of the nut. I've never had a tool break at a ferrule. Early on I had one break the shaft completely out of the handle but that was one hell of a catch and wasn't the wood or the Ferrules fault.
     
  13. Bill Boehme

    Bill Boehme Administrator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Jan 27, 2005
    Messages:
    8,122
    Location:
    Dalworthington Gardens, TX
    Home Page:
    My excuse would have been that there was a loose nut on the back of the handle. :D
     
    taxman likes this.
  14. Clifton C

    Clifton C

    Joined:
    Aug 26, 2006
    Messages:
    193
    Location:
    Hampton Roads Virginia
    HEY...I resemble that remark....:D:D:D
     
  15. Mike Johnson

    Mike Johnson

    Joined:
    Jul 26, 2016
    Messages:
    615
    Location:
    Nebraska
    I was on Ebay this morning restocking a few items and was looking at hose ferrules.
    There are a large variety of brass, aluminum and steel ferrules readily available in different
    diameters for water hoses, air hose, hydraulic hoses etc.
    The water hose ferrules have a rounded end and come in several sizes and are inexpensive.
    You can glue these on or turn the handle to correct diameter and press the ferrules on.

    [​IMG]
     
    Lamar Wright and Regis Galbach like this.
  16. Lamar Wright

    Lamar Wright

    Joined:
    Jun 29, 2017
    Messages:
    181
    Location:
    Jasper, Alabama
    Hi Mike, I am making a chatter tool using an old hacksaw blade and I have a 1" dowel to use for a handle. When you press the ferrule onto the handle do you use wood glue as well?
     
  17. Mike Johnson

    Mike Johnson

    Joined:
    Jul 26, 2016
    Messages:
    615
    Location:
    Nebraska
    Lamar,

    You can, or you could also use hot glue which you can heat up later on to remove if needed.
    Many of the ferrules I have seen on a number of tools are not glued on. When it comes to a
    tool being able to be fine tuned or removed or replace the working end of the tool, is always a
    consideration that should be made by the builder. Wood handles tend to dry out over time if
    not taken care of properly, this usually causes the handle to shrink and the ferrule to become
    loose. With the newer adhesives and wood sealers and finishes this may not be an issue in
    later years, so it comes down to your preference when assembling the tool. Many times it comes
    down to what adhesives you are comfortable in using which work with your finishes and wood.
    You could also use CA glue which can be heated up and allow removal of the ferrule if needed.
    Many ferrules are crimped on or a center punch is used to create an indent of the ferrule which
    holds onto the wood. If you are using epoxy to secure the shank of the tool into the handle then
    you could also epoxy the ferrule in place. My go to adhesive is Eclectic 6000 which stays pliable
    and grips all surfaces better then most. Many adhesives become brittle over time whereas this
    product will not.
     
    Lamar Wright likes this.
  18. Owen Lowe

    Owen Lowe

    Joined:
    Oct 25, 2005
    Messages:
    703
    Location:
    Newberg, OR: 20mi SW of Portland: AAW #21058
    I bought some of these several years ago. My complaint with them is that they’re pretty thin-walled compared with copper water pipe and much thinner than a copper or brass joint connector. I really don’t know the stresses ferrules are under so maybe it’s a moot point.

    I salvage copper or brass pipe & fittings whenever I can, so I have a small stash of various sizes whenever I need to make up a new handle.
     
  19. Bill Boehme

    Bill Boehme Administrator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Jan 27, 2005
    Messages:
    8,122
    Location:
    Dalworthington Gardens, TX
    Home Page:
    That was exactly my thought. I have seen them and concluded that the wood is stronger than those thin items, but maybe a ferrule is more decorative than actually a necessity. Some woodturners just wrap braided fishing line around the end of the handle and then set it with lacquer or varnish. I think whatever you use for a ferrule is mainly important when a tool is misused.
     
    Gerald Lawrence likes this.
  20. Mike Johnson

    Mike Johnson

    Joined:
    Jul 26, 2016
    Messages:
    615
    Location:
    Nebraska
    They make cheap ferrules and they make better quality ferrules.
    A cheap garden hose is rated anywhere between 50 PSI to 600 PSI the ferrules
    used on the better quality hoses are heavier walled.
     

Share This Page