"Slide Gloves" and black plastic tape.........

Discussion in 'Newbie' started by odie, May 18, 2017.

  1. odie

    odie

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    When you want to have ultimate friction free sliding on your final delicate precision cuts, these cotton "slide gloves" against the plastic tape is a real boon. One finger is left longer, so that it makes better contact
    with the black plastic tape.....
    . IMG_2802.JPG IMG_2803.JPG IMG_2804.JPG
     
  2. John Torchick

    John Torchick

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    Good idea but I'm not an advocate of gloves of any type around machinery under power. IMHO, gloves around machinery and sandals in the shop are a no-no.
     
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  3. odie

    odie

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    Thanks, John.......I guess you'll never know the advantages these slide gloves, along with the black plastic tape can provide when searching for a tool finish that can start sanding at a very fine grit. I think I'll continue to use this advantage.

    I do wholeheartedly agree about the sandals, though.....but not for the same reasons. It's just that I can't stand sawdust and shavings mingling with the little poets! I'll bet you didn't know my toes were poets, did you?.......they are Longfellows! :rolleyes:.....:D

    -----odie-----
     
    Last edited: May 18, 2017
  4. John Torchick

    John Torchick

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    ode, that joke is older than me. :cool: Once I dropped an Xacto knife point first on my foot. Even though I had leather shoes on, the point pierced the shoe and hit a small vein. Had a time getting the bleeding to stop.
    Edit: I went back and looked at the pictures and I understand what you are doing. The gloves are nowhere near the piece or machinery parts. Took me some time. Getting slow in my old age?
     
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  5. odie

    odie

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    While we're on the subject of gloves, I thought I'd show you these. They have a rubberized surface, and are cheap from Harbor Freight. I've found they are very good for getting a good solid grip on the angle head drills I use for my sanding operations. The finger tips have been cut off........
    IMG_2807.JPG

    -----odie-----
     
  6. Ely Walton

    Ely Walton

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    Hi all! I am not a safety nerd, but one point from above resonated with me... sandals in the shop. I tend to wear my Tevas everywhere about nine months out the the year. But when I work in the shop, I bite the bullet and put on socks and my Reebok sneakers. While they are not leather or steel-toed, that vinyl outer layer is my first defense between a dropped chisel and my skin. (And the original post about gloves is a great idea -- I have been using an older mountain biking glove to keep shavings from wearing away the side of my left hand during heavy roughing.) Thanks for all your wisdom and tips here!

    Ely
     
  7. Jamie Straw

    Jamie Straw

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    If there were chuck jaw edges sticking out, or the gloves were loose/floppy or Odie were a beginner or just plain dumb, I'd agree with Torchick. But I do not see a problem with the set-up that's pictured. I've had occasions with the Unisaw and the band saw where wearing gloves was safer than not. Not very often, but it does happen. Thanks for tip, Odie.
     
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  8. Mike Johnson

    Mike Johnson

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    What we need is a thin tear away glove that can breath. Latex gloves work fine but your hands
    are not able to breath and start to sweat while in use. There are hundreds of new gloves entering
    the market for various applications, hopefully someone will develop a product for the turning market
    that addresses the safety issue and functionality of the product.
     
  9. hockenbery

    hockenbery AAW Advisor Staff Member

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    I quit wearing a glove about 20 years ago when One caused a nasty burn.
    I used a leather glove with fingers cut off. A drop of CA wicked inside a finger.
    Didn't glue my finger just gave it a nasty burn with a blister. It hurt! No more gloves for me.
    Same thing happened to a guy I know about the same time. This burn changed my risk benefit to no glove...

    The danger posed by gloves, watches, rings, sleeves... is getting caught by a spinning edge.
    Round bowls and faceplates have no edges.

    If the edge of chuck jaws, square corners, natural edges, voids... etc. catch gloves, sleeves, or jewelry they won't let go and serious injury may occur.

    If those edges catch skin your skin lets go and you maybe have a cut or bruise that is most likely a minor nuisance type of injury.
     
  10. Mike Johnson

    Mike Johnson

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    I turn on a metal lathe a fair amount and wearing latex gloves is a standard practice to
    keep your hands from getting contaminated with cutting fluids, grease and oil. When working
    on a wood lathe the latex gloves come in handy when gluing segment rings while mounted on
    the lathe and using CA glue to join pieces together. A glove that would protect the skin from
    these chemicals put allow the skin to breathe but not be a safety hazard would be a plus.
     
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  11. Bill Splaine

    Bill Splaine

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    How about if you simply cut the finger off the glove and used that rather than a whole glove.. not much to get caught. But, what do I know.. I'm a true newb.

    CA on cotton not too bad.. however, CA on synthetic creates heat and a different fusion. Don't ask me how I know. It was CA on a Kevlar woodcarving glove.
     
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  12. RichColvin

    RichColvin

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    I may be overly careful, but I don't wear anything near my (wood or metal) lathes that could catch. So, no ring, no watch, & no gloves.

    The Army taught me not to wear jewelry when parachuting, and plant safety taught me to wear safety glasses and to never take shortcuts.

    As for the metal working, I figure it's easier to scrub my dirty hands than to reattach a digit.

    Maybe I'm overly cautious, but that's my approach and I've been safe so far.

    One note though: there are many on this forum with much more experience turning than I do, so take my comments with that in mind.
     
    Last edited: May 31, 2017
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  13. Bill Boehme

    Bill Boehme Administrator Staff Member

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    I assume that you mean the opposite of what Odie does where you would keep the fingers and toss the rest away. The fingers would need to fit snugly enough that they wouldn't be slipping or falling off during use. I envision a couple problems with that approach. One problem is that they would inhibit the ability to feel a surface. We are able to feel more than we can see when checking for imperfections in a curve or surface smoothness. A bigger concern is safety ... rotating machinery is very likely to grab anything that it can latch onto. The open back end of a glove finger would be something protruding out and in close proximity to the spinning workpiece ... and in danger of being grabbed and seriously injuring the finger. Finger injuries are very slow to heal and often leave some residual impairment.

    Fingerless gloves might be safer, but they still pose a risk of being grabbed. In manufacturing, gloves are not allowed to be worn around rotating machinery.
     
  14. odie

    odie

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    I can imagine just how much progress, and just how many advantages would never exist, if everything were eliminated which involved some element of risk........these slide gloves have an advantage that would never be realized, if OSHA set the rules for artistic endeavor. Since they don't, I still have a choice in what risks I'll assume.....and I'll also realize why the advantages are worth assuming the risks!......:D

    -----odie-----
     
  15. Bill Boehme

    Bill Boehme Administrator Staff Member

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    That' sounds like quite an impressive advantage.
     
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  16. odie

    odie

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    In and of itself......not so much, Bill.........

    But viewed as only one cog in the gears of success, it's worth having as a small element of the whole......!

    -----odie-----
     

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