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Starting machines

Discussion in 'Newbie' started by Per Andersen, Jan 8, 2018.

  1. Per Andersen

    Per Andersen

    Joined:
    Jan 1, 2018
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    Location:
    Denmark
    Hi there

    I'm a beginner and about to start turning.

    My question is, what is the most important tool / machine to by after the Lathe and wood turning tools?

    Thinking about a band saw? but not sure.

    Daughter is moving out soon, so finaly getting a room for my workshop :)

    Kind regards
    Per Andersen (newbie turner)
     
  2. RichColvin

    RichColvin

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    I use my bandsaw quite a bit. It is a very good all-around tool.

    Rich
     
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  3. john lucas

    john lucas

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    Some way to sharpen is the most important machine. Sharp tools make a huge difference in your enjoyment. Now if you bought all carbide tools then forget the grinder. A bandsaw is easily the next best tool to own. Dust collection is high on the list also but I have a friend in his late 60's who has turned his whole life and part of it was as production turner and all he has ever used is a fan blowing across the lathe to blow the dust somewhere else in the shop.
     
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  4. Lamar Wright

    Lamar Wright

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    Welcome to the forum. I agree with John and Rich that a bandsaw would be my next purchase, good dust collection and sharping system. I use the wolverine sharping system and very easy to use. Happy turning!
     
  5. hockenbery

    hockenbery AAW Advisor Staff Member

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    Depends on what you want to turn. The power tools I like want are

    1. Grinder and sharpening set up like a woulverine
    2. Chainsaw
    3. Dust collection for sanding
    4. Bandsaw with 12” resaw
    5. Drill press

    I do mostly green wood turning. My bowl and Hf blanks Are cut into rough blanks by chainsaw. Most are cut round on the bandsaw.

    If I were an architectural turner or segmenter I would want a table saw and might not need the Bandsaw
     
    Last edited: Jan 12, 2018 at 7:43 AM
  6. John Torchick

    John Torchick

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    Good chuck and make sure you have a credit card with a high limit.
     
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  7. Bill Boehme

    Bill Boehme Administrator Staff Member

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    Welcome to the AAW forum, Per. As others have indicated, what you need to buy next isn't written in stone. It depends on what you plan to turn. My opinion is that I wouldn't buy a machine unless I know why I need it.

    As John Lucas said, a grinder is essential for sharpening your tools (unless you are using tools that have replaceable carbide cutters). If you are harvesting downed trees then a chainsaw would be essential. A bandsaw would be very useful, but not absolutely necessary. Of course a shop vacuum cleaner and and dust collector are very important Most important of all would be personal protection equipment (face shield, dust mask).
     
  8. Fadi Zeidan

    Fadi Zeidan

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    I started with a lathe and carbide tools. I switched to gouges (do that if you haven’t), which required grinder and wolverine jig. I then got a chainsaw, which was a great investment and now I can get free wood or buy cheap logs. I then got a small bandsaw, I hardly use it since it is small and I can round pieces on the lathe anyway since I don’t do large pieces.
     
  9. Mike Johnson

    Mike Johnson

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    If you plan on turning segmented hollow forms a table saw or a compound miter saw is a must.
    Having a way to sharpen your tools is must to make your turning easier.
    There are a number of accessories that can be attached to your lathe for various applications
    like sanding, grinding, buffing that could get you by for a while without investing in dedicated
    machines for each of the operations. The chainsaw can cut and process a log into a bowl blank.
    A 12" band-saw is handy for processing 1/2 logs into various types and sizes of wood blanks.
     
  10. RichColvin

    RichColvin

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    As for sharpening, the other comments are spot on. I started with a bench grinder and a Wolverine type system. I switched later to a Tormek and love it. Bit of an investment, but is something you can add later.
     
  11. Owen Lowe

    Owen Lowe

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    The wood may be free or cheap, but the doctor visits, drugs, chiropractor, massage therapist, etc. more than make up for that! :D

    However, along the same lines as the chainsaw is a BHT to cart all those free or cheap logs home.

    (big honkin’ truck)
     
  12. Larry Copas

    Larry Copas

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    I have a 20” Delta bandsaw. I'm not fond of using it to make a bowl blank unless its pretty small. A 14” bandsaw would be torture. Balancing a large heavy chunk of rough wood on the table is not my idea of fun. I would much rather cut the blank with a chainsaw and put it directly on the lathe. Seems to be faster and a lot more fun making shavings.

    A grinder with sharpening jigs for bowl gouges would be my first purchase after the lathe. Dust collection for sanding would be high on the list but I don't always use my DC. I do put on the 3M respirator....works better and more comfortable than the little dust masks. Lighting is also important. I have a 4 light led fixture on my 10' ceiling located right above the lathe. Supplemental lighting is four reflector lights with 60W led bulbs.
     
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  13. Fadi Zeidan

    Fadi Zeidan

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    Then you realize that you need a truck. Loading logs in the trunk of a car is limiting and not ideal.
     
  14. Per Andersen

    Per Andersen

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    Thank you all for the good advice.

    Have bought carbide tools, so will wait with grinder.

    Bandsaw and dust collector will be next on list.

    Will start with rings and bracelets and later work my way up to bigger things.

    Thanks all.

    /Per
     
  15. hockenbery

    hockenbery AAW Advisor Staff Member

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    I edited my list to include a drill press.
    You may find one useful for bracelets.
     
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  16. Mike Johnson

    Mike Johnson

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    I will 2nd the drill press for rings and bracelets. A set of Forstner bits and hole saws will also speed up
    the process of making rings and bracelets. You can also turn your own mandrels to hold the rings and
    bracelets and make your own sanding mandrels for finishing the interiors of the rings and bracelets.
     
  17. Gary Beasley

    Gary Beasley

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    I have found a scrollsaw quite useful roughing out bracelets to turn.
     
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  18. john lucas

    john lucas

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    If you have carbide tools you don't need a grinder. Wait until you start using the non carbide tools to get the grinder. For now probably a chainsaw would be best. With a chainsaw and my Hunter carbide tools I could turn a whole lot of stuff and not need anything else. A bandaw would be reallly really handy if you want to turn smaller things like pens, Christmas ornaments, small boxes etc. Hard to cut out a pen blank with a chainsaw.
     
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  19. Per Andersen

    Per Andersen

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    Location:
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    Ok. Tanks again.

    Have chainsaw but only corded so no wood hunting with it.

    Will add a drill press to the list

    /Per
     
  20. Mike Johnson

    Mike Johnson

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    Per,

    If you laminate large enough pieces to make a bracelet with, you can use a hole saw to cut the
    inner dimension, the piece that comes out can be used to make a napkin ring or small box. You
    can use a smaller hole saw and drill another small round from the next piece and make rings. If you
    plan the drilling process out you can get quite a few pieces from one wood blank with little waste.
    Different sized Forstner bits is a quick and easy way to drill the inner dimension for your rings. The
    Forstner bit will drill a clean hole and reduce the amount of sanding required for the inside of the ring.
     

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