Thin parting tool choice

Discussion in 'Woodturning Discussion Forum' started by Jamie Straw, Jun 23, 2016.

  1. Jamie Straw

    Jamie Straw

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    I've heard nothing but rave reviews on the D-Way narrow parting tool. Pricey, though. Is there another "cat's meow" out there, or should I just bite the bullet? Dave's one of my favorite people, wish I didn't always have to consider $$.:(
     
  2. hockenbery

    hockenbery AAW Advisor Staff Member

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    I like the Chris Stott 1/16". Don't know if it is being sold by anyone.
    One piece of steel with a rubbery grip on one end.

    The crown 1/16" is similar the blade may be a bit longer and has a wooden handle.
    About $35

    Haven't used the Dway. By reputation it should be good.
     
  3. Fred Belknap

    Fred Belknap

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    Jamie we had Nick Cook demo at our club a while back and he demonstrated his signature parting tool. I think it is made by Sorby, I think he has a relationship with them. It is concave on one edge and makes a clean cut. he made a honey dipper and there wasn't any fuzzy edges. May have to get me one but I do mostly bowls.
     
  4. Hy Tran

    Hy Tran

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    I have the Crown (or its clone) 1/16" narrow parting tool. It's my favorite narrow tool. If you want to regrind to look like Nick Cook's, you can, but it works for me without the Nick Cook grind. You need to hone the edge from time to time, otherwise, you get an ugly cut.

    For tenons & stuff, I use a 3/16" diamond parter. Ditto honing the edge.

    A few years back, I needed a 1/8" parting tool quickly, and the only local store that had parting tools only had the fluted parting tool. I hate the fluted parting tool with a passion, but I may use it as a decorating tool.
     
  5. Clifton C

    Clifton C

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    I have two of the Slab style, Crown and Sorby, HSS about 1 1/4 wide by 1/16 thick. The problem I have is they have no taper (top to bottom) so shallow cuts or widen a bit to prevent binding. An Ashley Iles, milled from flat stock to a little less than 1/16 with a nice taper works well but I'm not sure its still being made. When I have to replace it I'm going for the D-way. I got to use one while taking a class at Arrowmont. When you pick it up, you can tell the difference, it feels nimble.
    I think I've put this off long enough...Thanks a lot...I'll let you know if it's as I remember...
    c
     
  6. Clifton C

    Clifton C

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    Hy,
    I ended up with a fluted parting tool, the one used with the flute down...The one that cuts up your tool rest !!! I'm not sure what I was thinking, I'm not sure what Sorby was thinking...

    On another note, I have, for sale, a fluted parting tool, used once...
     
    charlie knighton likes this.
  7. Mike Amphlett

    Mike Amphlett

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    I have a home made thin parting tool made from a reground worn out machine hacksaw blade It is 2mm (Approximately 5/64ths" in American) and 11"x 1.52. They are cheap, free, if you find a friendly metal stockholder/fabrication shop. Work in progress on this, I've mislaid the one I use

    Thin parting tool.jpg Thin parting tool 2.jpg
     
    Last edited: Jun 23, 2016
  8. Jamie Straw

    Jamie Straw

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    Thanks for all the info, guys. Near as I can tell, what sets the D-way apart from the others on the market is that the thickness of the blade is tapered to help prevent binding (plus, I assume, the M42 cobalt). I have a cheapie thin PT, will continue to use it for awhile, but I think I'm headed to a D-Way.
     
  9. Mark Hepburn

    Mark Hepburn

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    Jamie,

    This is the one I use mostly.. Henry Taylor, 1/16". It's M2 steel so isn't the same steel grade as Dave's I guess. But I've been using it for a good while now and really like it. I mostly prefer to turn my own handles but this one is comfortable.

    Last year, I bought a piece of HSS from flatground.com to take to a class with me. It's about 1/20" - just over 1mm, 1 1/4" wide and 18" long so I could make two parting tools with it. Worked out really well.

    But it's sure hard to vote against D-Way or Thompson tools isn't it? :)

    henry taylor.jpg

    Final thought: If you're looking for a 1/8" tool, Doug Thompson's is outstanding. Made from round stock and ground flat. I've bought a couple extra just in case he stops making them. He says the scrap rate is high on them but I hope he continues to make them.
     
  10. odie

    odie

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    I have this Nick Cook parting tool, and have been using it for about 5 years now. It works fine for me, and leaves a cleanly cut narrow groove. I'm using mine upside down as shown in the catalogue photograph.....flute up. Fred, did you notice if Nick Cook was using the flute up or down? I'm seldom grinding it, but am using a flat diamond hone to renew the edge each time I use it.......it ought to last pretty much forever! With the flute up, it will be similar to a scraper with a tiny ground bur on the top edge........

    ko
     
  11. Mark Hepburn

    Mark Hepburn

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  12. Bill Boehme

    Bill Boehme Administrator Staff Member

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    The flute is supposed to be on the bottom side and you only sharpen the short bevel on the top side. The only downside is that it has to overhang the tool rest so that the flutes don't rub on the tool rest. If you use it with the flute up then the edges of the flute might get rounded over slightly. I've had mine for a long time ... I got it well before it became a Nick Cook signature tool. I think that the price jumped up about ten dollars when it suddenly went from ordinary parting tool to a signature [parting tool.

    Anyway it is my favorite parting tool and I have worked in some really tight spaces with it. I bent it a couple times, but it straightened out just fine.
     
  13. Fred Belknap

    Fred Belknap

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    ( Fred, did you notice if Nick Cook was using the flute up or down?


    Odiie I'm not sure what is up and what is down. He make a point not to grind off the flute. I'm thinking he had the flute up but may be wrong.
     
  14. odie

    odie

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    Fred......I think Bill is correct that the original intent was for the flute to be down.....just wondering if Cook really did use it that way. Bill also makes a good point about the flute down requiring the tool to further extend over the tool rest, than the other way around.

    Seems to me there was a discussion about this long ago, and there was opposing opinions as to whether it was best with flute up, or down.....(Or, maybe is was just me who was bucking main stream thinking, as I have been known to do! :D) While parting, quite a few loose shavings get squeezed in-between the tool and the kerf, and it's best to have a firm grip to keep it from tending to twist in your hands......just in case there is a grab. With the cutting edge higher up (flute down), there is a fulcrum disadvantage, should there be a grab. When truing up the edge, the bur created will cut best if it's presented up (like a scraper bur), and oriented within the flute, rather than down.....so, the direction of the grinding/honing will be dependent on how that person intends to present the cutting edge to wood.

    ko
     
  15. Bill Boehme

    Bill Boehme Administrator Staff Member

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    The Sorby instructions that came with mine said that it is used so that the fluted edge is down ... and I know, who needs stinking instructions, anyway. :D

    Many years ago our club had Nick Cook here for a week of classes on spindle turning. One of the projects was to make a honey dipper. We used that parting tool to make the notches in the dipper ... flute was down. Having said all that, about half the turners that I know use the tool turned the other side up and it seems to work about the same
     
  16. Bill Boehme

    Bill Boehme Administrator Staff Member

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    I seem to recall the same discussion. Name any tool where there aren't multiple opinions about the best way to use it. :D
     
  17. Jamie Straw

    Jamie Straw

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    Happy to help!:)
     
  18. odie

    odie

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    Hi Mark........Yes, you are absolutely right! It's difficult to pass on some of the great precision made lathe tools being produced these days. The quality is outstanding, and for that reason, you certainly get your money's worth. The one thing that sticks in my mind, is I question whether these premium tools provide any utilitarian benefit.....other than it's nice to have "the best"......? I've pondered this question, and can't justify the expense above the "plain Jane" Sorbys & Taylors, etc. I suppose there may be flute shapes that some can become accustomed to, and get nowhere else, but when it comes to "rubber meets the road", I'm not seeing much difference.......

    Another thing that seems useless to me, is all the specialized steels that are available. Yes.....very true.....the hardness does lead to sharpened edges that last longer, but to what practical applied benefit? I have purchased some of the harder steels, and have concluded that I like plain ol' M2 hss steels......mainly because they sharpen and shape much easier than the Rockwell leaders of the pack!......and, this is especially true for those of us who prefer to hand hone our lathe tools.

    I suppose I should always mention that when I praise methods and preferences I've become accustomed to, this doesn't mean at all that my way of doing things is better than anyone else's.........except when I discuss those things being used by my own hands........:D

    ko
     
  19. Gretch Flo

    Gretch Flo

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  20. Andy Chen

    Andy Chen

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    I have had an Ashley Iles thin-kerf parting tool for a number of years now and absolutely love it. It cuts a 1/16" kerf and the the blade is only ~23/32" high, unlike most other brands that are >1" which is needed to maintain the stiffness when you have a long and thin blade. Mine has a thicker back (11/64") to provide the stiffness on the 1/16" cutting part. This design allows a narrower kerf when you cut rings out of a disc, like when you make a bowl-from-a-board. (Or, I can cut two rings out of one "feature ring" for my segmented work.) Additionally, the thin blade is tapered so it would not bind. Unfortunately, Ashley Iles appears to have dropped this product. It is not shown at the site you quoted here and not even at Ashley Iles' own website. D-Way had a similar product but the picture and description on their current website do not show this design.
     

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