Thin parting tool choice

Discussion in 'Woodturning Discussion Forum' started by Jamie Straw, Jun 23, 2016.

  1. John Brown

    John Brown

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    A SawsAll blade with the teeth ground off sharpened on one end any way you like and electrical tape wrapped around the other end makes a real good one and doesn't cost an arm and a leg.
     
  2. Mark Hepburn

    Mark Hepburn

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    Hey Kelly,

    You have a valid point. It's the same reason I don't by "designer" jeans or whatever. I like my Sam's Club jeans and they're every bit as good as anything else I've worn so, for utility value there's little point in spending more. Same for signature tools I think in many cases. Now, my favorite tools are my Ellsworth and Thompson tools. But I'd say that it is their noticeable (to me, anyway) difference in quality that makes me willing to spend more. I'd spend more for increased utility value if I needed to, but a "name" is meaningless unless it brings with it some value that is otherwise unobtainable.

    I ground my first bowl gouge - from a Benjamin's Best set - to an Ellsworth grind and it worked fine, but I could sure tell the difference in how long it lasts, and really, how well it takes an edge. And I do believe that the PM tools and Doug Thompson's tools are worth it. Actually, I think that Doug's tools are a bargain compared to a lot of the stuff out there. I just bought a 1/2" spindle gouge and a 3/8" detail gouge for less than my 3/8" Crown PM bowl gouge. Quite a bit less, actually.

    But that's just my opinion. I could be wrong. :)
     
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  3. Mark Hepburn

    Mark Hepburn

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    John, I confess. I've done that too. Except I slapped some knife scales on it with some epoxy and it worked pretty well. Lately I also use a small veneer saw for a parting too. Lathe reversed, turning slowly, it works very well for small stuff.
     
  4. Jamie Straw

    Jamie Straw

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    Well, I've missed some good discussion since Odie's last post -- we've been dealing with the aftermath of a car missing a curve at the front of our property, becoming airborne, going through the front hedge, landing about 50' in and then plowing into our old boat and trailer. Made quite a mess, and we have to fence off that big hole in the hedge to keep the dog in. I feel that, just perhaps, we should put up a "No Entrance" sign also. Poor guy, evidently had a seizure of some sort -- OK though.

    Back to parting tools and tool snobbery. A couple pics -- car at rest (and totaled), and car being winched out the way it came in.

    Auto+Officer.jpg Auto leaving1.jpg
     
  5. Bill Boehme

    Bill Boehme Administrator Staff Member

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    Jamie, I'm sorry to hear about all the excitement ... not a good day for all involved.

    My opinion is that Thompson tools are a good deal since they cost less than Sorby or others, are made of more exotic alloys, sharpen just as easily and just as sharp, and hold an edge longer. If there's a downside it would be that they are sold unhandled. I can't imagine that a woodturner would feel that making a tool handle is anything other than an opportunity to personalize their tool. How much trouble is it to make a handle anyway? Odie, my favorite bowl gouge is a Sorby probably for no reason other than it was the first one that I owned. I have managed over the years to get quite a collection of bowl gouges for reasons that defy explanation and most of them are Thompson... not that I dislike the others... they're all very good, but whenever possible I buy US made products.
     
  6. hockenbery

    hockenbery AAW Advisor Staff Member

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    I agree Thompson tools are competitively priced. I have a about eight 5/8 diameter bowl gouges with the Ellsworth grind. I find I get a much nicer edge on the PM tool's with the CBN wheels.


    In order of how I like them.

    Jamieson by Thompson.
    Ellsworth signature Crown
    3 Henry Taylor's M2
    2 Packard (crown?) M2
    Thompson V - just use this one for roughing I don't like it for shear cutting. Flute is too narrow.

    al
     
  7. Mark Hepburn

    Mark Hepburn

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    I also prefer to buy tools unhandled. Another benefit of Thompson tools to me at least.
     
  8. Jamie Straw

    Jamie Straw

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    So, near as I can tell after reading all the descriptions above, D-Way has the only thin parting tool that is tapered in thickness to decrease binding (since there's no longer an Ashley Isles version). Correct?
     
  9. Clifton C

    Clifton C

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    Jamie, I think you are correct. Like I mentioned earlier, I have not been able to replace my Ashley Iles thin parting tool. It was well made, and, better yet, it worked. Now it's just a little short at one end. One of our club members gave me a power hacksaw blade to try out. I outfitted it with a beautifully made duct tape handle, tried a few different grinds and decided it was adequate, so, yes, it worked but it wasn't fun to use. I have one made from a steak knife that looks like it may have come from the outback, same thing, it works, but you still have to widen the kerf to keep from binding/burning if parting deep. A few others that I mentioned in an earlier post work ok.
    I got to try out Dave's parting tool last year and knew I'd get one eventually. It will arrive tomorrow...I'l let you know If it's as I remember...
     
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  10. Jamie Straw

    Jamie Straw

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    Please do! When I get back to spindle turning, I'd like to have a really good TPT. I looked at the Ashley Iles tools, some interesting stuff there, good to have check 'em out.
     
  11. MichaelMouse

    MichaelMouse

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    I've had the Sorby fanged tool since it was $29.95 - maybe twenty years. No problem with the tool rest, as I stress often, when you hold the tool to it with your off hand so it won't bounce. By doing that, rotating up and into the area to be parted (or down), you toolrest will remain undinged.
     
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  12. odie

    odie

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    Howdy MM.......

    Theoretically, it would seem that rotating the tool down into the cut would be pretty dangerous.....:eek:

    You might need to explain that a bit further......

    -------------------------------------------------

    Most of my parting tool use is removing a finished bowl from the waste block. It doesn't have to be as clean a cut as possible, but the fluted Nick Cook tool does a very decent job of it, nonetheless. For those who'd like to try a fluted parting tool, Richard Raffan explains how to do this in his video. (Or, it might have been in his book.....can't remember off hand.) A couple barbs can be created on the leading edge of the parting tool by using the corner of the grind wheel. All that's necessary is to grind a V into the leading edge, and the tool has a couple "spurs" that act similarly to the fluted gouge. It's good for several sharpenings, or until it's necessary to renew the V spurs.
     
  13. Bill Boehme

    Bill Boehme Administrator Staff Member

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    That's a clever descriptive name, fanged. At today's prices I might feel like I got fanged in the pocketbook. I noticed that Sorby has two variations of fanged parting tools. Mine is what they now call the Nick Cook parting tool where the angled fluted portion is meant to overhang the tool rest, but I have done up close work with the fluted portion on the rest. I am always more concerned about dinging the flutes than the tool rest since the tool rest in my case has a hardened steel bar.
     
  14. Bill Boehme

    Bill Boehme Administrator Staff Member

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    My interpretation is that it would be like a peeling cut where the tool makes an arc towards the center rather than straight plunging into the side.
     
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  15. odie

    odie

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    Could be, I suppose......but MM did say he was holding the tool to the rest with his offhand. If that is so, then the cut would necessarily be an arc at a fixed pivot point, and the tool not moving on the rest.......I'm a little confused about just what he's telling us.........

    ko
     
  16. chrisdaniels

    chrisdaniels

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    I have done the sawsall blade parting tool, if you go that route I highly suggest you get a "fire and rescue" blade. they are the strongest blades made for a sawsall. I didn't really care for that route because it was not very stout. I ordered a sorby thin parting tool from amazon, it was like 30$ handled so it's kind of hard to go wrong with that. I have no issues so far with it.
     
  17. Bill Boehme

    Bill Boehme Administrator Staff Member

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    I've never parted off anything where I didn't stop to check my progress and adjust the rest so for me it would be a moot point.
     
  18. charlie knighton

    charlie knighton

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    sounds like Kansas city and now I do not have to move boat every time to mow.......glad he is ok
     
  19. Jamie Straw

    Jamie Straw

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    That may be the intention.
     
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  20. Jamie Straw

    Jamie Straw

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    To whom are you replying, Bill? The quote didn't load.
     

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