Tool rest issues? Calling all turners...lol

Discussion in 'Newbie' started by Christopher Martin, Dec 2, 2014.

  1. John Torchick

    John Torchick

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    Not an expert by no means but wouldn't a first step be to clean it with a good heavy-duty cleaner of some sort to get sap, etc. off the tool rest? Then, the next step is to polish or finish it baby-bottom smooth.
     
  2. john lucas

    john lucas

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    John It would probably get sap off but things like gunked up CA glue or lacquer or other finishes that often get on the tool rest won't come off with simple cleaners. If you do the sandpaper thing regularly it keeps them clean but if not it may take a file to clean one off. If you have a cast iron tool rest and get lots of catches, especially with cheaper tools that often have sharp corners, you can nick the tool rest. I file will take off the high points of the nick which is good enough in most cases.
     
  3. Christopher Martin

    Christopher Martin

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    Well John I clean my tool rest every day many times a day with scotch bright for metal (red) its like same paper case you didn't know... and yes I use sand paper too as well 220 , 320, 400, and 600.
     
  4. odie

    odie

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    Assuming the turning tool, and the tool rest has been properly prepared with mating smooth surfaces, there are only two things that will interfere with that single metal-to-metal contact point sliding effortlessly through the cut.

    1. Your hand sliding on the tool rest.

    2. Too big a bite with your cut.

    There is a solution to both. Too big a cut is obvious.....take a smaller bite!

    Your hand making contact with the tool rest isn't practically avoided, but the tool rest can be prepped with plastic electrician's tape, or Teflon tape. A fingerless cotton glove, along with preparing the tool rest with a taped contact point, will make your hand glide on the tool rest surface.

    With this link, you'll see some tape-prepared tool rests, and an explanation on post #1:
    http://www.aawforum.org/vbforum/sho...g-your-tools-slide-and-glide-on-the-tool-rest

    With this link, you'll see how I've prepared a cotton fingerless glove to mate with the tape on post #82, page 9 of this thread:
    http://www.aawforum.org/vbforum/sho...shop-and-quot-evolving-shop-quot-photos/page9

    Making those tools slide and glide is no secret, but it does take some preventive application of a few things to cover all the bases....;)

    Also, using fine grit sandpaper works better than nothing, but if you're really serious about sliding your tool on the tool rest, you'll give those two contact points a real polished surface. Get a 3M wheel to do this. This is explained in the first link above.

    ko
     
  5. dbonertz

    dbonertz

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    Just by using the tool rest keeps them clean and free of binding particles. They always rub off just from tool contact and motion. I never really understood the need to clean the tool rest in the first place but nothing wrong with it if you choose. I use a vicmarc cast iron tool rest and never need to clean it. I only once had to file and sand a ding out of it from something that hit it and I have been using it for eight years. Just hand wipe the wood juices off after roughing and go to the next piece.

    I may be stating an obvious but are your tools sharp. This often is mistaken for to much drag on rest when in reality the tool is not sharp enough and the drag is metal to wood.
     
  6. Christopher Martin

    Christopher Martin

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    Just so every one is aware I have a machine operator Over 10 years back round and worked with areospace parts with harden parts you can't grind so I know metals pretty well and there is nothing wrong with the tools i'm using for as rust,

    tree sap, ect, ect, And my rest is in good shape when I do my finishes I remove my rest move the banjo and cover the bed ways so I try to take good care of my equiment.

    I I did read your link you sent a few post back and it's a great Idea. I do have a few vidoes of my turnings but the camera angle isn't to good but you get the idea the hold that is most forgiving for me is a light over hand grip I need to

    keep my wrists straight as possible any catch in bent possition gives me extream pain, an it is just more natural I do like a under hand grip too big with these big bear paws I can't seem to have enough clearence.

    Here is my video if you wanted to see my forms... It was my first video and you can see why I don't do many. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=09KicYDtMrY&list=UUtlUUQDjMhyOTDyMwnsP-rQ
     
  7. Christopher Martin

    Christopher Martin

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    Ok I tried some underhand work and it doesn't matter. It seems something is causing the wood particles and fibers to stick like static or something to the rest and tool i'm using. Then for some reason it feeling like sand paper under the tool causing the drag. Now type of woods shouldn't matter right ?? I've turned cherry , oak , ebony , some other exotics as well.
     
  8. hockenbery

    hockenbery AAW Advisor Staff Member

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    Took a look at some of your video. There is a lot of dust from the roughing gouge. That generally indicates a dull tool.
    While I can't see the tool presentation often, it appears you are mostly scraping. Scraping will dull tools much faster than cutting.
    Also dense woods dull tools more rapidly.

    Sharpening tools often and well makes us better turners.
    Dale mentioned it earlier. Might be dull tools.

    They are sharp when you start but dull as you wear off the burr.
    Try sharpening your tools more often.

    Al
     
  9. Christopher Martin

    Christopher Martin

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    I been working with new wood to me (excotics) mostly and a few are super dense and do dull tools very quick, I do check my tools often and in that video the tool could have be getting dull...dust or small shavings is a sign I look for maybe I was getting tired or something I do know. I will be doing more videos so I can see what is going on and in a few days when I get the equiment again I will post a better angle of tool work. Funny think I did some turning last night maple and had no issues at all so could it be the wood? Does some wood have more static and want to dray its self to the metal and me?



    It almosts seems like i'm grasping at crazy ideas...lol
     
  10. john lucas

    john lucas

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    Wood definitely varies in how it cuts. I have a love hate relationship with Bacote. It turns Nasty leaving mostly dust and no shavings It cuts like its very hard but sands kind of like its soft and scratches easily. Why do I turn it. It's beautiful when I'm done.
     
  11. hockenbery

    hockenbery AAW Advisor Staff Member

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    I had a video of a demo I did on gouges, different types, how to sharpen, and what they do.
    There was a problem with recording the sound on the DVD. So it is intermittent.
    My grand plan is to dub in what I might have said.

    This may be of use to you to see how I use the roughing gouge and spindle gouges.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Qs_VhUJRrPM

    In spindle turning I put very little pressure on the tool rest as all the cuts are from the top down toward the center of the wood.
    When I am holding the gouge only with my thumb, my fingers are supporting the work.
    Fingers under the handle, tool on the tool rest, thumb on top of the tool.
    This approach may not work for you.

    Wood in the demo is citrus. It is fairly hard A little harder than cherry and softer than hard maple.

    John has some nice videos out on YouTube too.
    Al
     
    Last edited: Dec 5, 2014
  12. Dwight R Rutherford

    Dwight R Rutherford

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    You mentioned grasping at crazy ideas. You also mentioned the wood dust clinging as in static. Is your lathe properly grounded?
     
  13. odie

    odie

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    It may be obvious to those who know what sharp is. There are just too many turners who only think they know what sharp is, and can't be convinced otherwise that they need to re-think their own sharpening techniques. Some don't understand that "sharp" is only momentary, and to maintain that ultra level of sharpness means returning to the grinder and honing about 10x as many times as they ever even considered before!

    If you're doing that final cut prior to sanding, the sharp edge might last only a few seconds before it's gone. Understand it, live with it, and DEAL with it. Until that mental obstacle is traversed, the boundary of what is possible doesn't move back to reveal new, and undiscovered territory......!!!!!.....and, if you don't expose yourself to new territory, you will be forever limited to the boundaries you've set for yourself. ;)

    ko
     
    Last edited: Dec 5, 2014
  14. Christopher Martin

    Christopher Martin

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    That is mostly what have been turning this week. Pens and smaller stuff. In the past few weeks also had the same issues with other woods but not nearly as much as the bacota, an Banksia Pods.
     
  15. Christopher Martin

    Christopher Martin

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    Right On ....All i need is a few mentors like you guys closer...lol Anyone in "central michigan " looking for a challange look me up...haha
     
    Last edited: Dec 5, 2014
  16. Christopher Martin

    Christopher Martin

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    Yes I am grounded qiuet well Dr would say too well... oh you mean the lathe yes it is. :cool:
     
  17. KellyDunn

    KellyDunn

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    Christopher, I read through all this. Its drag from the tool to the tool rest if I got that right. You say you use like a parafin but after 15 minutes its gone and back to dragging. Christopher, I re apply candle wax to the tool rest and tool every few minutes. If it drags I just grab my yank of wax and rub the rest and the bottom of the tool. No need to super clean all the time. If after a few days it looks like wax buildup on the tool rest just take the edge of a screwdriver and rub it off and put more on. But as long as the tools slide smooth I dont care. Try what I am suggesting. I stand at the lathe for a living. It needs to slide.
     
  18. robo hippy

    robo hippy

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    Well, I have never waxed any of my tool rests. The hardened drill rod does not need it. I do have one cast iron one, and never waxed it either, though some do. I wish I could teleport over there to see it first hand....

    robo hippy
     
  19. KellyDunn

    KellyDunn

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    Robo, Maybe its my climate. But whenever I demo no matter the place I clean and wax the tool rest. I clean and wd or other light oil the ways and under the banjo. Unless it all acts smooth. But always wax the tool rest. I have to my knowledge never demoed on a rest with the tool rod. Here rust happens fast. But it takes almost no time before I get stops and apply more wax. Easy, just a yank of old candle. A quick rub and I am good to go for a little bit. Detailed turning needing slick sure tool movements as soon as I get a metal to metal grab I reach for that piece of wax. I only offered what I did cause his description sounds like mine. But if any here do not need or have that problem please ignore what is my every day solution.
     
  20. hockenbery

    hockenbery AAW Advisor Staff Member

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    Kelly, I carry a file and an old candle in my demo kit.
    About a 1/3 of the time tool rests are unusable until filed and most need a little care.

    Not too much rust but lots of nicks and dings
     

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