Tool rest issues? Calling all turners...lol

Discussion in 'Newbie' started by Christopher Martin, Dec 2, 2014.

  1. Christopher Martin

    Christopher Martin

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    I have never waxed my rests. Until recently I have not had no issues with tool rests that i am describing and the last 36 hrs I stopped using wd 40 and mineral oil even longer maybe 4 or 5 days was the last time I used it. I have been sticking to cleaning back of tools with 220, 320, and rest the same 220, 320 seemed to clear most of the gliding issues I have experenced with on the 12" rest but I have a new 9 " rest doing same issue so I been working it the same I think it's getting better all I can think is either some clearer I used or penteration oils are causing this. I was going nuts thinking it was the way I was turning but it is something else.

    And do not plan to use wax on my rests.
     
  2. robo hippy

    robo hippy

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    With my old PM, I did have rust issues. When I wore out the headstock bearings, I took it to a tool repair place. They really had to work to get the old bearings out because they had rusted in place. We aren't as humid here, well, not in the summer any way, but I also turn wood, and the wetter the better. I did have to wax the cast ways on the PM. Since I got my Robust, no problems because of the stainless ways. No rust on the drill rod rests either. The Oneway bowl rests are stainless as well. They are not as slick as the drill rod, or as hard, but still slicker than the cast metal rests.

    When turning Madrone, I have to take the tools to the grinder that has a wire wheel on it. The entire shaft is coated with gunk, and doesn't want to slide or sharpen. It does load up on the CBN wheels, but comes off when I sharpen a scraper on them.

    robo hippy
     
  3. Christopher Martin

    Christopher Martin

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    Well I do have some humidity in my shop durning the summer months, right now it's low 37% tooday. My shop is in the basement and temp stays a constant 66-69 degrees. Durning the summer the humidity can get 70% but usally about50%to 55% most of the year. I do have to sand down the tools and any cast iron tops cause I will get surface rust on them. I use top coat for the cast iron tops by empire. I also was using them for my tools to get the gunk off tools and rest as well. I am not sure if I will use them on the lathe tools and rest or not. maybe just wd-40.
     
  4. Don Bunce

    Don Bunce

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    I use Johnson's paste wax on my tool rests, works great.

    I also use it on my diy captive hollowing rig, makes the boring bar slide easily.

    I suggest you try it, if it doesn't work for you, mineral spirit will clean it off.

    Good Luck, and happy turning!
     
  5. Christopher Martin

    Christopher Martin

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    I forgot about Johnsons paste wax that is what I starting out using on my cast iron and anything that would rust.
     
  6. Bill Boehme

    Bill Boehme Administrator Staff Member

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    Christopher, it looks like Don Bunce beat me to recommending Johnsons Paste Wax. As far as I am concerned, it beats all of the other products by a mile. I use it on everything -- don't forget to also apply it to your turning tools as well. JPW makes the toolrest slicker than greased lightning. So, why not apply it to the tool as well.

    I am presuming that the "red 3M cloth" you mention is crocus cloth. There are different grades of crocus abrasive so you might possibly be putting a fine scratch pattern on the tool rest. I also see some nicks and other rough spots on your toolrest. What caused that? My guess is that they are there because some of your tools haven't been properly dressed by easing over sharp edges and polishing the surface until it shines. I suspect that many turners don't do it, but it will make a big difference in friction. Think about it: smooth toolrest + rough tool = half a solution. I go way beyond crocus cloth in polishing my toolrests which also includes using metal polish before I apply JPW. Some bowl gouges have a surface finish that can stand improvement so I do the same treatment as I do to the toolrests.

    Despite the hardness of the metal used, things still wear and gunk from even "dry" wood accumulates on the rest and tools so none of this is a one-time fix. Just keep a rag saturated with JPW handy so that you can touch up the surfaces when the friction becomes a problem.
     
  7. Bill Boehme

    Bill Boehme Administrator Staff Member

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    I just looked up 3M Red Abrasives and found that it is a line of Velcro/PSA backed sandpaper for automotive body work. That sounds too coarse to me for "polishing" a toolrest except for cast iron.
     
  8. Christopher Martin

    Christopher Martin

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    I get some rough spots on my tool rest from my 3/16s parting tool , and my thin parting tool leaves light scratches as well. I have taken the sharp edges off all my tools but the parting tool 3/16 's is really messed up. I hope " Santa " brings me a new one. I growned the edges and screwed it up like noones business. Growned out the dimand part of one side but, I have taken all the shard edges off it that i can. This was one of my first tools I got and not knowing a damn thing about how to sharpen it... I stopped using the 3m metal polishing cloth and I am only using sand paper to clean any knicks , groves ,what ever is on the tool rest and back of tools. I have went back to wd- 40 for general clean up instead of mineral oil. WD 40 works as a better lubericant for the bed ways. I will get the JPW out and give the bed ways a healthy coat and tool rests as well... :cool:
     
  9. john lucas

    john lucas

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    I'm a fan of Johnson's paste wax but on my lathe it's just faster to spray on some WD-40 and wipe it down. I will vouch for the candle wax. I use it on my hand planes which are always clean and with a polished sole. But you take one swipe down the wood with a scribble of candle wax on the bottom and you'd swear you have bearings under the plane. It's that dramatic. I'll have to try in on the tool rest and see. I was doing a short demo for a few guys who were in my shop yesterday and when I made a pass down the wood with a skew it seemed to sort of slow down through a section of the wood. I thought it was a knot there but when i stopped the lathe it was a clear piece of wood. I put some WD-40 on and tool glided the whole way across the wood this time. It was quite dramatic and I think they could even see how much smoother the skew slide across the rest.
     
  10. hockenbery

    hockenbery AAW Advisor Staff Member

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    I use Ballistol on the ways, banjo, tailstock, and tool rest. I get it from Don Geiger. Ballistol is used to coat firearms for storage.

    Spray it on, use a little sand paper on tough spots, wipe off excess with a disposable towel.

    I hate the smell but put it in when done and the smell is gone the next morning. Love the smell of WD 40.

    I used to use paste wax. Ballistol lasts longer than the paste wax.
    When I was turning a lot paste wax would last about 2-3 days Ballistol lasts a week I heavy use longer with less use.
    I use it on all cast iron beds, bandsaw, tablesaw.

    Al
     
    Last edited: Dec 10, 2014
  11. Steve Worcester

    Steve Worcester Admin Emeritus

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    On my Robust rests, I rarely have to do anything to them. I do sand the shaft that goes into the banjo, because it gets a light rust coating from turning wet wood, but the top where the hardened rod is, unless I get glue on it, Every great while, I hit it with 400 lightly. Not any oil or wax like before.

    if your a wax fan, try bowling alley wax that Woodcraft sells. Works really well and no colorants.
     
  12. Bill Boehme

    Bill Boehme Administrator Staff Member

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    I prefer a Scrabble.
     
  13. odie

    odie

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    In addition to the other suggestions here......

    Since this summer, I've been using a 3M pot scrubber on the top surface of my tool rests when exchanging for another tool rest. That is, if I see any gunk or residue sticking to the top surface. What I've done is attach a retractable ID card/magnetic key card retainer to a magnet with hot glue. I can place this anywhere on my lathe, but it's been pretty much constantly attached near my speed control unit. Usually this will do the trick, except for the most hardened crud. As long as the residue isn't allowed to dry for any length of time, it works very well. :D

    ko
     

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    Last edited: Dec 13, 2014
  14. terry q

    terry q

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    Sand the rest with 320 to remove any debris and scratches. I use ordinary wax paper to slick up the rest and tools. Things get a little draggy I just wipe again with wax paper. Cheap, easy and fast.
     

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