turning baltic birch ply edge question ?

Discussion in 'Woodturning Discussion Forum' started by Jason Waguespack, Feb 4, 2015.

  1. Gerald Lawrence

    Gerald Lawrence

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    I Think you are in a state of denial . Just go ahead a do it . My name is Gerald Lawrence and I am addicted to TURNING. Ok me too.
     
  2. Bill Boehme

    Bill Boehme Administrator Staff Member

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    I deny that I am in denial. :D :rolleyes:

    OK, so I like woodturning ... I've been told that I even turn in my sleep. But ... it's not harming anybody else ... and, I don't inhale wood dust. :) Maybe track a few tiny shavings into the house. :rolleyes:
     
  3. olaf Vogel

    olaf Vogel

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    I’ve turned quite a bit of Baltic birch ply and it’s technically not tough. Its very consistent and pretty good re tearout. However, its VERY hard and abrasive.

    Years ago my hi-tech employer had cubicals built from 1" baltic birch and junked them all when I joined. Wonderful material for building parts, supports...anything. I lugged home several thousand pounds of it. Will be using it for years. One day I'll make a bowl.

    This is normally for crating my own v-belt pulleys for my machines. Normally I use white glue to laminate and let dry for a day or two.

    Sometimes its just many squares laid up and mounted. Then I attack if cross grain, with a Thompson gouge, just to get it round.

    If I'm a hurry, its a 1/4" carbide scraper with a 24" handle - stay out of the way when the corners fly off.

    Like others have said scraping is tough! Very dry material, heats up a lot, dulls tools quickly.
    But wonderfully consistent, no need to be delicate, no voids, no chance of breaking the stuff.

    (VERY unlike regular plywood)

    For pulleys, I have a special scraper, ground to the exact size of a 4L belt grove. Then I just dig it in til I hit the line on the scraper. Lots of fine hot dust though.
     
  4. Curtis Fuller

    Curtis Fuller

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    I've turned a bit of Baltic Birch plywood. The results depend on a few things. First, the quality of the plywood. The stuff I can buy at the neighborhood big box stores doesn't seem to turn very well. It has too many voids and is more splintery. I've bought better wood but higher priced at woodcraft and it turns pretty well. It will need a little sanding though and a hard surfaced sanding block rather than hand held or sanding discs will keep the edges from rounding and keep the sandpaper from eating at the soft layers.
     
  5. Bill Boehme

    Bill Boehme Administrator Staff Member

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    I made the mistake of buying Baltic Birch plywood at one of the big box stores once. It came from Central or South America. The adhesive was something noxious like urea formaldehyde and the wood was low quality and full of gaps. Also the sheets weren't as flat as the real deal. There's a hardwood lumber dealer that I usually go to. They usually get it from Finland and Sweden ... wonderful stuff. I love the aroma. It brings back childhood memories of Tinker Toys. They were made of unpainted wood back in the good old days.
     
  6. Clifton C

    Clifton C

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    Olaf, of course you are right, but, you've turned quite a bit... Jason says he is just starting out...
     
  7. Bill Boehme

    Bill Boehme Administrator Staff Member

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    The thread is close to three years old and sort of took a new direction with Dave Scott's post on Monday. I agree that it takes some skill with bevel rubbing cuts.
     
  8. Mike Johnson

    Mike Johnson

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    Dave Scott likes this.
  9. Mike Johnson

    Mike Johnson

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  10. John Torchick

    John Torchick

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    Marine plywood is designed and made to have no voids to prevent water from getting between the layers.
    Denial? Isn't that a big river in Egypt?
     
  11. Jason Waguespack

    Jason Waguespack

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    yes the post is an old on ----- but I still check back to it every now & then ---- thanks for all the input
     
  12. Gary Beasley

    Gary Beasley

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    My woodworking club, Gwinnett Woodworkers, had a field trip to the shop of a talented wood artist who made furniture in a similar fashion. Some of his pieces are in well known museums. Cant for the life of me remember the guys name.
     
  13. Derek Lane

    Derek Lane

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    Having produce a piece with ply for a competition I used a standard grind bowl gouge but kept it sharp this made it easier to cut. I not only use the lathe for turning bowls etc but also use it for making parts for toys and wooden models.
     

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