Turning beads on spindles,platters and bowls video

Discussion in 'Tutorials and Tips' started by john lucas, Apr 24, 2012.

  1. john lucas

    john lucas

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  2. Bill Weaver

    Bill Weaver

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    John why are you working with the tool rest so far out from your work?
     
  3. john lucas

    john lucas

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    Didn't realize it was. It was probably the camera. When using the beading tool I do use it a little further from the work because I start the cut below center and work up into the work. With the other tools I use as close as I can to reduce vibration of the tools.
     
  4. Bill Weaver

    Bill Weaver

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    John,
    With tool rest moved out a little have you encountered any grabbing. I'm not being critical here......just remembering old wood shop rule always keep tool rest within 1/8 inch of your work.
    I like your video and understand to get a good bead with out tear out you should start with upward cut. I'm going to try your method and see if my turnings will improve.:)
     
  5. john lucas

    john lucas

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    Bill It all depends on the tool you are using. I have a very long bevel on my detail gouge. It's the nature of the beast since it's so thick. Consequently I have to move the tool rest away because you don't want the bevel on the tool rest. This is common with parting tools as well. However on either of these tools you have so much leverage that having the tool rest away from the wood isn't a problem at all and of course necessary because of the longer bevels.
    Tool rest distance has as much to do with how you cut and length of the handles as anything. For example I seldom use my curved tool rests unless it's a large deep bowl or I'm using a scraper. Scrapers tend to grab more than cutting tools. I frequently turn bowls up to 8" in diameter with my flat tool rest. That means I often have the tool hanging 3" or so off the tool rest. I don't have any problems but then it's probably my experience along with how I'm using the tool.
    I also do a lot of inside out turning or turnings where you keep part of the wood square. On these turnings it's impossible to keep the tool rest close. I use thick tools like my Thompson detail gouges, and take light cuts and it's no problem.

    Ideally a tool rest should be as close as possible but there are just so many situations the limit this. Turning a cove for example. You can't have the tool rest close to the bottom of the cove. You can view my video on cove turning on youtube and you'll see that the tool has to extend beyond the tool rest.
     

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