Turning tool to buy?

Discussion in 'Newbie' started by John Torchick, Nov 18, 2016.

  1. Mike Johnson

    Mike Johnson

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    John,

    If you have a budget to stay in, the regular grinding wheels will work fine for the time being, no need to spend
    big dollars on CBN wheels until you have the spare coins to throw down.
    That is a big eye opener when you have a freshly sharpened tool to work the billet with for the first time.
    A dull set of tools is like trying to cut a tough steak with a butter knife.
     
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  2. john lucas

    john lucas

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    I missed this post somehow. Look at the Hunter Hercules or Osprey. They have replaceable cutters but the hold an edge far longer than the EZ wood tools. They work great as scrapers with virtually no learning curves. You also have the advantage of doing a bevel rubbing push cut which is far superior to anything you get off the EZ wood tools. Those do require a learning curve but if you've learned push cuts with a bowl gouge it's the same with the Hunter Hercules. You can also turn the face of the cutter toward the wood and do a shear scrape which is a very safe cut. Here is a video showing how I use the tool. The Hercules and Osprey are used the same way.
    View: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vzrLN8SQ8ms&t=5s

    I will be doing a demo for your group in January. I'll look through my sharpening stones and see if I have any you can have. What size is your motor shaft. You don't need slow speed if you use a light touch. I'll be glad to show on their grinder when I get there. Or could come up to Cookeville on Dec 5th to our club meeting. I am doing a sharpening demo that day.
     
  3. John Torchick

    John Torchick

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    Motor shaft is 1/2 inch, according to a bolt/screw gauge. 5/8 is too big and 7/16 too small. Wheels on the grinder are 6 inches.
    I'll keep the December date in mind; can't promise anything, though. If I can, I'll contact you for directions. Thanks for the invitation.
     
  4. john lucas

    john lucas

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    I checked and only have 2 wheels left both are the wrong grit for you and they are 8". Sorry.
     
  5. John Torchick

    John Torchick

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    Thanks, John. Looking to coming to Cookeville, so far. I feel it would be worthwhile.
     
  6. John Torchick

    John Torchick

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    Well, to add to this thread. The rheostat didn't work at all. It would shut off but didn't affect the speed one bit. My son's friend said a light dimmer would work as it is rated for more amps than the motor. Will try it.
    Meanwhile, trying to figure out what to spend my Christmas money on for turning.
     
  7. Bill Boehme

    Bill Boehme Administrator Staff Member

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    A light dimmer will work with universal motors which are small brushed motors ... examples are hand drills, hand sanders, small belt sanders, shop vacs, routers, weed eaters and edgers to name a few examples. The motor would have to be one that doesn't have a built-in speed control and the dimmer needs to be rated to carry the peak current of the motor. If you go this route one caveat is that it will limit the top speed of the motor considerably from its normal speed.

    If the motor is a regular AC induction motor then a light dimmer will NOT work. The good news is that the dimmer will, by making the ultimate sacrifice, serve nobly as a fast acting fuse ... thus saving the motor from also being destroyed. :eek:
     
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  8. Mike Johnson

    Mike Johnson

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    I was looking at some of the Sorby threading tools, they have a variety of threads per inch
    thread cutters available. Is there a thread count that works better for a broader selection
    of woods and materials used for threading?
     
  9. Bill Boehme

    Bill Boehme Administrator Staff Member

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    I believe that the sixteen TPI is the most popular and probably the easiest to get successful results. I don't know where you would use ten TPI which is rather coarse. Twenty TPI probably requires hard tight grained wood.
     
  10. Mike Johnson

    Mike Johnson

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    Has anyone used stabilized wood billets with resin and a vacuum chamber and then threaded
    these woods after stabilization? Will this harden any wood enough to take a good thread?
     
  11. john lucas

    john lucas

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    Nope but I've threaded epoxy quite a few times and I'll bet it's quite similar. I just sent an article on how to do that for lidded boxes to Josh for American Woodturner. Don't know when it will get published. Bill I use larger threads for larger boxes. I leave the fit loose to account for some wood movement. I have an 11TPI that I made myself. I only use 20 tpi for very small boxes where there won't be any wood movement, such as acorn size earings.
     
  12. Mike Johnson

    Mike Johnson

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    I have turned threads on Corian material and it works very well, I suppose I could glue
    a ring of Corian onto the wood pieces to accept the threads if the woods will not. You can
    always recess the Corian into the wood pieces and not readily see the Corian used for the
    threading joints or you could use the Corian as an accent ring with the right color and finish.
     
  13. hockenbery

    hockenbery AAW Advisor Staff Member

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    cast pewter rings can be threaded too.
     
  14. John Torchick

    John Torchick

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    Not putting in a plug for Woodcraft but their latest sale flyer had the Rikon low speed grinder at $99.99 which is a savings of $40! Got it on the list! I can put the $40 toward something else.
     

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