UK - Woodturning Magazine Q

Discussion in 'Woodturning Discussion Forum' started by Owen Lowe, Nov 4, 2017.

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Woodturning UK Subscriber Survey

Poll closed Nov 11, 2017.
  1. Few ads with a lot of content

    0 vote(s)
    0.0%
  2. About the right balance between # of ads and amount of content

    8 vote(s)
    72.7%
  3. Too many ads and not enough meat.

    3 vote(s)
    27.3%
  1. Owen Lowe

    Owen Lowe

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    I’ve been tempted for years to subscribe; I see that they now offer a digital subscription and the temptation is even stronger.

    When you click on “Look Inside”, 8 images are shown, one of those being the cover. My concern is that of the remaining 7 pics, 4 of them are of advertisements!
    Is this indicative that 60% of the content is advertising?

    I really don’t want to spend money on something that is primarily an advertising vehicle rather than woodturning content. (Years ago, I dropped Fine Woodworking because it felt this way about its focus.)

    Thoughts?
     
  2. Bill Boehme

    Bill Boehme Administrator Staff Member

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    The December issue is 109 pages including the back cover. There are 40 pages of ads which includes an ad on both sides of the back cover and the inside of the front cover. If you don't count the ads on the covers, there are 37 pages of ads. Several of the ads are for the magazine itself, so thirty something pages of ads for stuff that would be of interest to woodturners (sorry, no ads for Neiman Marcus, Macy's, Sears, pharmaceuticals for seniors, Franklin Mint limited edition Christmas ornaments, Tide laundry detergent, GEICO Insurance, and all the other stuff that fills up most magazines). There are also a few pages of standard boilerplate (Table of Contents, contributing authors, etc.) The rest is good content if you are into turning wood. I think that most magazines are 2/3 ads. If the advertising is relevant to your interests then it's a lot more tolerable than ads that aren't. It's a tough balancing act ... ads make magazines more affordable, but too many ads can be even worse.

    I get the digital edition which is a lot cheaper than getting a hard copy. I can read it on my iPad or on my desktop computer. I am slowly being dragged into the digital media world. I read the newspaper, National Geographic, American Woodturner, QST, and a few others online. The good thing is that I don't have to deal with piles of magazines, but paper magazines are more convenient and there's no batteries to go dead. I can read the iPad in a dark room whereas reading a paper magazine requires good lighting ... so in reality reading paper copies requires more electricity than reading it on an iPad. :D
     
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  3. Emiliano Achaval

    Emiliano Achaval

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    Woodturning Magazine is the best one for the average woodturner. Lots of ideas, projects and interesting work by professional woodturners. Maybe I should mention that I work for the magazine, lol.
     
  4. john lucas

    john lucas

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    I subscribed digitally this year. Still getting used to using a tablet, I still prefer flipping pages myself but it's just too expensive to do that. It is an excellent magazine and I always enjoy Mark Bakers comments at the beginning. For newer turners it's really excellent. For more experienced turners I still prefer American Woodturner because it often delves into the deeper topics concerning turning.
     
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  5. Bill Blasic

    Bill Blasic

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    I'll agree with John here. You can if you want print out the articles a page at a time but it is best if you use A4 paper as not to cut off the last lines on the page.
     
  6. Bill Bulloch

    Bill Bulloch

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    Bill, how do you print a page from the magazine? There is no option available to me to do that.. I use a snipping tool but that only lets you print the part that is on the screen.
     
  7. Donna Banfield

    Donna Banfield

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    Like John Lucas, I subscribe digitally to Woodturning UK. But, I prefer the American Woodturner, overall, simply because of where I'm at in my woodturning journey. I no longer have an interest, or the time, to try a bunch of different projects, which is something that the UK magazine is very good at including every month. So for a woodturner that is just starting out, or someone with skills, looking for different ideas, this magazine is ideal. I did several of their projects a few years ago, and appreciated the articles - well written, with plenty of photos to follow each step in the process. The AAW's American Woodturner, (which is a Journal, not a magazine) has more content which piques my interest today, though. It's not the 'How' anymore, but the 'Who and Why'.
     
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  8. Owen Lowe

    Owen Lowe

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    Thank you for your observations on Woodturning mag; it’s a valuable comparison with the Journal.

    I’m curious what the definition of journal means to you. Thinking I’ve had an incorrect notion of what a journal is I had to launch my dictionary widget ;). It says that it’s a newspaper or magazine that deals with a particular subject or professional activity. In other words, it’s not the published format but the content focus. It seems as though Woodturning magazine may be considered a journal too. Just curious.
     
  9. Donna Banfield

    Donna Banfield

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    My understanding is a Journal is a publication devoted to an organization or group, and their activities, exclusively. For example, I belong to the Guild of NH Woodworkers, and they publish a journal, a very high quality publication that focuses on the activities and events of that group. There is some limited advertising, but the primary purpose of the publication is not profit, but more to exist for the benefit of it's members, and to inform, share and educate. The American Woodturner's primary purpose is similar; to inform, share and educate it's members of events associated with the AAW, and other woodturning things of interest to the membership.

    Woodturning (UK) magazine, on the other hand is not a publication of the AWGB, or the Worshipful Company of Turners. While it may report about events on those two organizations, and others like them, the primary purpose of the magazine it make a profit. If it is not making money for the parent company, GMC Publications, it will cease to exist. Just like Woodturning Design folded, along with the rest of the 6 or so specialty magazines, that were all owned by a single company.
     
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  10. john lucas

    john lucas

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    Don't forget More Woodturning magazine. An excellent online magazine with a fairly wide variety of content. I don't necessarily find one magazine better than other, just different and the more variety I am exposed to the more I learn.
     
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  11. RichColvin

    RichColvin

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    I read all three of these : Woodturner (UK), the AAW magazines, & More Woodturning. I like the digital approach as I can do screen captures on my iPad, & then save the pics to Evernote where I can easily find stuff later.

    Rich
     
  12. Raul McCai

    Raul McCai

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    That and the never seemed to mature. That is the rag is targeted almost exclusively to people entering the hobby and after one gets past some stage it's just juvenile. How many times can they run the article "THE LAST WIPE ON FORMULA YOU WILL EVER NEED"??
     
  13. Bill Boehme

    Bill Boehme Administrator Staff Member

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  14. john lucas

    john lucas

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    I used to subscribe to all the woodworking magazines. I have since dropped all but fine woodworking and Wood. That's mainly just to keep up on new tools and sometimes you get some great tips. I've seen all the articles on how to cut dovetails about 20 times over the years. Never helped. Apparently you actually have to practice to do those. :) Kind of like reading that you need to rub the bevel to be able to turn.
     
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  15. Owen Lowe

    Owen Lowe

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    I think if you go back 15 years and longer, it was quite a different publication, kinda like the earlier years of This Old House. Now they both seemed focused on tool and product reviews and not the art and craftsmanship of either endeavor.
     
  16. Emiliano Achaval

    Emiliano Achaval

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    I believe its difficult to please everyone. I have heard both sides, experienced turners don't want one more article on how to sharpen your gouge. Beginners dont want to see something that seems impossible to do or years ahead of them. I personally don't like too much the super artistic articles on pieces that don't even look that were started on a lathe. I told Mike Mahoney when he visited me that I was kind of stuck on bowls, plain work on the lathe. He told me, nothing wrong with that! Aloha
     
  17. Ron Rutter

    Ron Rutter

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    You read QST! So you "ham" it up on the air as well. Ron. VE7RHR.
     
  18. Bill Boehme

    Bill Boehme Administrator Staff Member

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    WA5SOE. Been licensed just over 50 years, but haven't been on the air in a long time. I've been a life member of ARRL for about 40 years.
     
  19. Ron Rutter

    Ron Rutter

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    I was licensed in June 1957 as Ve3ECP in ontario. 60 years this year! Haven't been active for a while Maybe soon again! Should be able to push the button on a mike. Sure could not operate a key with my arthritis. Actually sold my old bug about 4 years ago.Cheers.
     
  20. Emiliano Achaval

    Emiliano Achaval

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    I remember spending hours with a friend of mine, talking to people from all over the word. He would exchange postcards with everyone, had a wall full of them, and a world map with pins with the cities he had made contact... Very impressive and fun...
     

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