Useful shop gadgets.....shop, and "evolving shop" photos......

Discussion in 'Tutorials and Tips' started by odie, Jan 26, 2013.

  1. David G. Jones

    David G. Jones

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    My dust collector rig

    This is my first post, so I hope it meets the "standards".

    For a long time, I mounted the big gulp scoop on the back end of the banjo of my Powermatic, but I got tired of removing it when turning big stuff. I had found some nice LED lights at Costco and mounted one of them on my tailstock to get plenty of light on my work, and was looking at the parallel arm balancing mechanism. One thing led to another, and I ended up with the dust collector mount in the photos. I used window sash springs to counterbalance the weight, and I can just put the hood anywhere that I need it, or push it out of the way without having to even walk around the lathe. It works really well for me.

    David Jones
     

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  2. odie

    odie

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    Of course it does, David....:D

    I'm willing to bet your idea will be used by a few others....and, I think that's a great idea for a very convenient dust collector intake.

    Question: How do you like the LED lights for your lathe? I just ordered a LED light on a magnet base, but hasn't come yet.

    ooc
     
  3. Jeff Gilfor

    Jeff Gilfor

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    Sometimes I wish that my lathe was near a wall, so that I could mount things that way. Unfortunately for me,mill have to make due with jamming the big gulp between the headstock and the tool rest with the banjo out the other side.

    Boy though, that looks very rugged!
     
  4. David G. Jones

    David G. Jones

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    I like the LED lights very much. The ones that I found are 5 watts each and have a daylight spectrum. They don't have a blue or yellow hue.
    The one mounted on my tailstock works very well for illuminating the interior of a thin green turning so that I can use the light transmission through the wall to gauge just how thin it is getting.

    I just got another LED light from Costco that looks like a 2 tube 4 foot fluorescent strip fixture, but puts out at least twice as much light. I think it was rated at 38 watts. I mounted it directly above the lathe for general lighting.

    I have a couple of IKEA LED lights with the small head on a gooseneck that work pretty well, but they are not nearly as bright as the ones I have mounted on the lathe. I was in Costco again a few days ago and they had some LED lights that were 5 watt and had a similar head, but used single tube arms with friction hinges for adjustment. They could probably be adapted for lathe use pretty easily.

    David
     
  5. Bob Hayward

    Bob Hayward

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    I picked up this LED light at Home Depot this afternoon, ~ $100. So far I really like it. Do not look directly into the LED panels though. :eek: Worse than looking directly into a camera flash. I use the light while roughing in a small oak bowl. It was nice to be able to lower the light so it shined right into the interior of the bowl while hollowing the blank. So far a real nice addition to the incandescent gooseneck lamp mounted to the tailstock end of the bed.

    Bob
     

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  6. odie

    odie

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    I have one of those IKEA single bulb LED lamps that I mounted to a magnetic base. The original intent was to get the light right inside the interior of bowls with inward slanting walls, but it never worked out very well for that purpose. A couple weeks ago I ordered another lamp to try this concept again.....and this one works better. This one has 20 LEDs on a flexible gooseneck mounted to a magnetic base.....much better. I now have three lamps at the headstock, and a dual 4' fluorescent shop light hanging over the lathe.

    The IKEA lamp was now obsolete, and not being used.....and the mental gears turned! After a flash of insight, it's now mounted on my grinder, and replaces a drop light I had been using to clearly see the grind take place on gouges......I can't believe how much improvement this is! The single LED bulb is positioned at the 12 o'clock position just a couple inches away from the work, and directly above the grinding taking place. Wish I had done something like this years ago, because it's a much better way of doing it.

    There is also a shot of the accessory holder that normally stays near the tailstock. Items there are those I use frequently.....pencils, backing pads, tool holders, depth gauge, disc replacement tool, measuring jigs, chuck key, reminder, bubble level, wrench, spindle thread guard, banjo hole cover, baton bumper, spare toolrest holders, etc. Everything is nice and handy, and able to withstand a blast of compressed air without flying off and getting lost.

    ooc
     

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    Last edited: Oct 11, 2014
  7. Gerald Lawrence

    Gerald Lawrence

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    There is also a shot of the accessory holder that normally stays near the tailstock. Items there are those I use frequently.....pencils, backing pads, tool holders, depth gauge, disc replacement tool, measuring jigs, chuck key, reminder, bubble level, wrench, spindle thread guard, banjo hole cover, baton bumper, spare toolrest holders, etc. Everything is nice and handy, and able to withstand a blast of compressed air without flying off and getting lost.

    ooc[/QUOTE]

    The holder is neat I just hate to move a tray/holder so I can use the tailstock so I use drawers. Love the fish (JESUS) on the lathe. Is that a plug in the tailstock? IMG_0722.jpg This is on my old lathe have another set on the 3520B.
     
  8. odie

    odie

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    Hi Gerald......

    Nice looking set-up you have there.....guess you don't need to go far for your most used tools, jigs, and supplies!

    I can certainly understand not wanting to move the accessory holder, and opting for drawers instead.....however, it does detach quickly.....just a block underneath to fit between the ways.....lifts right off.

    Yes, indeed.....Jesus, being a carpenter, hangs around my shop all the time!

    Yep.....just an old cork I use to keep dust from entering the Morse Taper of the tailstock.

    Later....

    ooc
     
  9. Steve Worcester

    Steve Worcester Admin Emeritus

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    I like those, but I wear flip flops more often than not in the shop, (I can here the Tifosi screaming about foot protection) more comfortable and the chips slide out. While I don't get protection if I drop a tool on my feet, I just don't do that. The only thing shoes provide is to keep the severed toe in the shoe. I will wash it off and take it to the ER if that happens . But I have a cushioned floor and they are more comfortable.
     
  10. Jerry Bailey

    Jerry Bailey

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    Don't forget to pack it in ice for the road trip :D
    I too work/live in flip-flops, and shorts, have for last 10 years
    Like you say, just pay attention to what you're doing, and all is fine, even better as it's way more comfortable ;)
     
  11. hockenbery

    hockenbery AAW Advisor Staff Member

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    I usually wear sports sandals. They give more support. If I wore flip flops for a day my back would tell me about it for weeks.
    The big thing about open toed footwear is to remember not to kick the half log I left in the middle of the shop where it would be out of the way.
    :)

    I do wear shoes or boots when using the chainsaw and I double tie the laces.
    I do need some protection from dropping wood on my foot as this seems to happen 2-3 times a year.
    Shoes can make it almost painless some of the time. :)
     
  12. odie

    odie

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    Whatever works for you guys......but, I need my feet and toes covered....no open shoes. It really is uncomfortable to have chips and sawdust mixed in with my feet.

    The original discussion revolved around "shoe bibs", and I'm currently using mine to keep out the chips and debris. They have somewhat a design flaw, in they don't form a very good cone shape around your ankles and shoes. I have modified mine to do this, and now am using them regularly. They do a good job at keeping the chips from getting in-between socks and shoes, and snagged on the lacing. They also keep you from tracking the chips into the house. It's a great idea, but the initial design needs to be tweaked a little bit. I did it by folding over one side and tying it off so that it makes the cone shape.

    I also have some cut off red sweatpants that go over the calf and cover the shoe. This works even better, but they are not easy to put on, or take off. (A younger person with a more flexible body wouldn't have the problems I have putting them on.)

    ooc
     

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    Last edited: Nov 10, 2014
  13. odie

    odie

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    This may not be something that will help many other lathe turners, but it works great for me. I have a sliding steel plate at the top of my headstock which allows me to attach things with magnetic bases at various positions. The steel plate slides over the top of the magnets to various locations, and the magnetic bases can be positioned anywhere on the plate surface. A flat surface on the headstock is required for this option to be viable. The magnets are attached to the headstock with industrial two sided tape......

    ko
     

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    Last edited: Nov 10, 2014
  14. odie

    odie

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    Filling cracks and gaps on bowls and other turnings.........

    In my opinion, using clear epoxy is the best method for filling cracks and gaps. I use the 5-min, 2-part, clear epoxy. After drying overnight, it's sandable and cuts with lathe tools as well. You can use cellophane tape to mask off any place where you don't want the epoxy. A great tool for mixing epoxy, is an artist's palette knife, available at any artist supply store......get one! Not shown in my photo are medical finger cots. These cots have been great for spreading the epoxy, and pushing it into cracks.....throw away when done. I'm using index cards for mixing epoxy.....the stiffer card is much better than trying to mix on a regular piece of paper.......

    ko

    You can get an artist's palette knife set on ebay for less than 5 bucks:
    http://www.ebay.com/itm/5pcs-Stainl...975?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_2&hash=item19f419443f

    You can get the finger cots, 100 for a buck on ebay:
    http://www.ebay.com/itm/Lot-100pcs-...389562181?pt=US_Nail_Care&hash=item4d285b6d45
     

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    Last edited: Nov 25, 2014
  15. odie

    odie

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    "Evolving shop photos"

    Here is my buffing station just after I made it up in 2007. The other two photos are the buffing station as it is today. As with most things in everyone's shop, evolution is evidence of personal growth. The motor is a 1 1/2hp Leeson I removed from my Australian Woodfast lathe when I upgraded to variable speed. It's more power than is necessary, but it's what I had to make a buffing station, so I used it! It's a hundred times better than the 1/2hp motor I was using! As you can see, there are numerous modifications, and notes on stickers. As I learned how to make the Beall buffing system work better.....I took notes! If those notes are right in front of you each time you buff, you are reminded of what works.

    ko
     

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  16. odie

    odie

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    More info on the Beall buffing method:

    For the first few years after I first started using the Beall buffing method, I used latex medical gloves to give myself a better grip on the bowl. This helped immensely to overcome a few times the buffing machine tried to rip the bowl out of my hands! There were several lost bowls when I first started using the Beall system......it was such a heart-sinking feeling to see your finished bowl bounce across the cement floor! After awhile, you'll get used to what works and what doesn't....and how to avoid catastrophes. I believe it's now been a couple of years since I've used the latex gloves.....I've learned well, because of a few disasters.....and those latex gloves!:p

    Another important thing I've learned, is to rotate the top of the bowl towards you when doing exterior buffing.....(This, assuming you have a counter-clockwise rotation of the buff itself, and standing on the left side.) This continually moves any residue of the buffing compounds directly in the path of the buffing wheel.

    Use the Tripoli (EEE) and White Diamond buffing compounds very sparingly, and replenish often. This keeps the compound lightly distributed, and from smearing on the surface. There is nothing worse than overloading with Tripoli and White Diamond. This will plague your efforts until you figure out why it isn't working for you.

    When doing the interior, I have a platform that raises my body up a few inches, and I work directly in front of the buffing wheel. Doing this allows me to hold the bowl at waist level and facilitates my body AND hands to work together giving a smooth circular motion to the bowl itself. The bowl is never held at a perfect 90° to the motor shaft. It's always tilted so the motor shaft is pointed away from the bowl to varying degrees. By doing this, and assuming you have prepared your bowl to near perfection, it propels the final step into a finish near perfection.

    ko
     
  17. Dan Hines

    Dan Hines

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    Really appreciate

    Thanks Odie for starting this thread and to all those who shared. A newish turner in North Carolina.
     
  18. odie

    odie

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    Hey, you bet Dan......:D

    You know, I've said this many times before.....I'm not here to show or teach others, I'm here strictly for my own personal benefit, even when it appears as though I'm just passing along information. When I explain things, it makes me stronger in my own thoughts.....sometimes more resolute, and sometimes more "visionary" in my own thinking, simply because I'm here typing those thoughts, trying to make things clear to everyone reading them. In that process, my own thoughts become more clear to myself! Not only that, but these forums have inspired me to consider other viewpoints.....and, ultimately have caused change in my own way of doing things. That very thing has happened several times since I started this thread! Besides that, having other's input have caused alteration of my ways in such ways that neither he or I were thinking of.....but, that input from the other person was necessary for the "thought direction" to materialize.

    Hope that makes sense......but, the bottom line is, I have made many improvements to my own turning since I have, and because I have been a participant in these AAW forums.......:cool: very :cool: !!!!!

    ko
     
  19. odie

    odie

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    Since this summer, I've been using a 3M pot scrubber on the top surface of my tool rests when exchanging for another tool rest. That is, if I see any gunk or residue sticking to the top surface. What I've done is attach a retractable ID card/magnetic key card retainer to a magnet with hot glue. I can place this anywhere on my lathe, but it's been pretty much constantly attached near my speed control unit. Usually this will do the trick, except for the most hardened crud. As long as the residue isn't allowed to dry for any length of time, it works very well.

    ko
     

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    Last edited: Dec 13, 2014
  20. Jeff Gilfor

    Jeff Gilfor

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    Great idea Odie!
     

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