Useful shop gadgets.....shop, and "evolving shop" photos......

Discussion in 'Tutorials and Tips' started by odie, Jan 26, 2013.

  1. hockenbery

    hockenbery AAW Advisor Staff Member

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    Chalk works really well for this. Put it on the high spot comes in colors easy to see when the piece is in motion.
    Compressed air removes any left over chalk from dry bowls.
     
  2. Clifton C

    Clifton C

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    I use chalk too, and most of the time I can find it. I had a spare laser pointer so made this little contraption, quick and dirty,
    just electrical taped the laser to the top my work light. The funny thing is it works a little better then expected. I've used it for bowls and platters,
    but also for pinpointing the rim of a natural edge bowl or even a specific area on an eccentric piece. Shoot it across the shop and
    it even shows you how much dust is floating in the air.
     

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  3. odie

    odie

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    Good morning!

    One drawback to using chalk, is the moment your tool hits it, it's gone! This may not be an issue for some, but from my perspective, it cuts right to the heart of how a fine tool finish is accomplished. It isn't done with a single pass, but multiple very delicate passes.

    Here is my laser jig. I primarily use it for interiors of bowls, but could be used on exteriors just as well. This would be a personal preference on my part, but I prefer to use the sharpie/pot scrubber for exterior surfaces.

    The articulating arm is made up from a magnetic base used for a dial indicator. It's been modified for quick non-sliding axial adjustments, with a flat steel piece attached to the end for laser pointer. The laser pointer is kept in a dust free plastic case with magnets attached to the bottom. It's stored with the articulating arm on top of the headstock. There is a magnet attached to the laser pointer itself, and this is used to mount it to the steel plate at the end of the articulating arm.

    Note: One bit of added benefit to the articulated arm, is it's a great indicator of harmonic vibration due to out of balance pieces of wood. I'm one who doesn't generally do distinctly out of balance turnings, but I do turn the occasional piece that is. While the articulating arm isn't being used, and in the upright position, there are times when it's extremely useful to fine tune the rpm for the least vibration possible.

    ko
     

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    Last edited: Mar 21, 2015
  4. Gerald Lawrence

    Gerald Lawrence

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    Kelly, Have to say this may be the neatest ting you have come up with.
     
  5. odie

    odie

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    Hey, thanks Gerald.......

    You should see all the things I "invented" that didn't work worth a darn! :D

    ko
     
  6. odie

    odie

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    For standard ground gouges only........

    Sometime last year, I began using some cloth hockey grip tape on the shank of my gouges, near the ferrule. There is a purpose to my madness with this! I'm not sure how I came to this idea, but for standard ground gouges, the tape gives my fingers a little extra "feel" to it, while the grind is taking place.

    Of course, most turners don't use the standard grind as much as I do, but just in case there are a few who do.....this is worth a try. It is only worthwhile if the grind wheels are in balance, and a very delicate spin of the gouge is being done with a light grip of your fingers.

    A standard grind is where the handle butt fits into the "V" arm of the Wolverine jig, and spins on the tools axis while being ground. Some turners may refer to this grind as the "traditional" grind.

    ko
     

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    Last edited: Apr 6, 2015
  7. odie

    odie

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    Handmade single point depth measurement tool........

    Although I've been using this single point depth gauge for several years, I'm finally getting around to showing it to you......:D

    The first photo shows all four of my handmade depth measuring tools, but the one with the blue wrap with white stripe is the one I'm discussing in this post. It's kept on my accessories tool holder that stays on the far end of the long bed lathe.....last photo.

    Close-up in the second photo. It's simply a 1/8" stainless rod with a wood handle wrapped in colored hockey tape. there is a red sliding piece of 1/4" air hose on the shank of the stainless rod.

    3rd photo: Put the tip of the stainless rod to the bottom depth of the interior of the bowl. Visually align the near and far edges of the bowl rim and slip the red sliding air hose section so it matches the rim on both sides.

    4th photo: Take the depth gauge from the interior of the bowl, and place it on the outside towards you. Align the near and far rims to the red sliding air hose section. You must then move your eye over to the left some so that your view is approximately 90° to the end of the stainless rod. Observe where the end of the rod aligns with the foot of the bowl.

    5th photo: The single point depth gauge is located near the top of the photo. (blue wrapped handle with white stripe)

    I've used this single point depth gauge for virtually every single bowl I've made for the past few years. It's quick and easy, and you don't have to move tool rests, lamps, air supplies, lasers and other things that get in the way of using a more traditional depth gauge. It doesn't replace the accuracy traditional depth gauges offer, but it's very close......depends on how good you are at aligning three points visually! :p

    ko
     

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  8. hockenbery

    hockenbery AAW Advisor Staff Member

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    Hi Kelly,

    I can use your system to set the depth on drill bits I use on hollow forms.
    With a tight fitting sleeve like your red tubing I can mark the depth I want to drill by sliding the sleeve.
    I now mark the depth with tape. The sliding sleeve would be quicker and more accurate.

    Sometimes I do similar measuring on shallow bowls in a more low tech way. If I'm still turning I will use the gouge as depth gauge holding my thumb nail to mark the depth. If I have near finished surface I use a pencil with the eraser against bottom center. I also use calipers a lot too.

    Great idea.
    Thanks for sharing

    Al
     
  9. odie

    odie

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    Tomkins Gage 'T.....and Versa-Cal calipers........

    These two shop tools are definitely worthwhile to have if you are making bowls.

    The Tomkins Gage 'T is expensive, and I understand the mold and tooling to make it is why. I was a complainer about the price, but after using it for a year, or so, it is something I've found a place for among my lathe tools and jigs.

    Like many things that you initially complain about the price, it's one of those things you're glad you bought! I use it often, and it's great in giving you an idea where on a bowl wall you need to thin a bit. It will also tell you where you need to not get any thinner! This is valuable information if you do many bowls......and, the Gage 'T gives you an "overall perspective". I would buy it again.

    The Versa-Cal calipers are very easy to use.....much more so than the standard double end calipers. The advantage is in the grip holes. It makes this calipers one-handed to use. Matter of fact, I converted my older double ended calipers to allow for one-handed use because I like that advantage!

    ko
     

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  10. odie

    odie

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    Micro interior LED lamp......

    I made this adjustable LED interior lamp with some parts available from HF. Total cost was around $17, and the parts were as follows:

    Magnetic base for dial indicator
    Battery operated single cell flexible lamp
    Hose clamp
    A few pieces from my "junk drawer".

    The hose clamp, along with a wooden slide, gives me some lateral capability, without adjusting the height. I installed a little piece of rubber hose over the LED itself, so the beam can to concentrated at a spot, instead of an area. The lamp body where the batteries are located slips into a piece of plastic tube. This makes it easy to remove for installing new batteries. (At the moment of typing this, I have forgotten, but the batteries are either a couple of AA, or AAA standard batteries.)

    I don't need a little lamp like this very often, but it's very handy to have when I do. The lamp can be adjusted to come over the top, completely out of the way of other tooling.

    ko
     

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  11. odie

    odie

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    Convenient shop exercise program

    Since retirement in January, I've combined my exercise program with time in the shop. Every two hours, I do five one-minute sets of upper in combination with a stepper. If I stay in the shop for 8 hours, I'll do 20 minutes of good solid exercise.

    gloves
    curl support
    straight pectoral spring
    grippers
    10lb dumbbells
    15lb dumbbells
    timer
    screaming meanie timer

    In order to keep the equipment dust free, I've installed wheels on an old military ammunition storage box w/lid.

    I learned right away that I can't hear a regular kitchen timer over machine noise, but it's still good for timing the exercise. I purchased a trucker's "screaming meanie" extra loud timer that I can hear, while the lathe, or any of the other equipment is running. (available at a truck stop, or eBay) The screaming meanie will sound the alarm until the 9v battery is dead.....so, that's why I put my keys in the dust free plastic box with the timers......just so I won't forget to turn it off, if I leave the shop.

    One interesting observation I've made is, even though you don't feel like taking a break from whatever you're doing at the moment......sometimes taking that exercise break works out to your advantage. This is because you have a moment for contemplation and reflection......!

    If anyone else is combining exercise with shop time, I'd be really glad to hear about it. Equipment suggestions are helpful, too.....but, remember this is a very dusty environment.

    ko
     

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    Last edited: Jun 28, 2015
  12. Gerald Lawrence

    Gerald Lawrence

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    One interesting observation I've made is, even though you don't feel like taking a break from whatever you're doing at the moment......sometimes taking that exercise break works out to your advantage. This is because you have a moment for contemplation and reflection......!

    If anyone else is combining exercise with shop time, I'd be really glad to hear about it. Equipment suggestions are helpful, too.....but, remember this is a very dusty environment.

    ko[/QUOTE]

    Kelly that is an interesting observation about the break. Yes the exercise is good, just not sure the shop is good for me. I do feel better when I take a break instead of ploughing thru. I just have to figure out something like you did to make me stop.
     
  13. odie

    odie

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    Hi Gerald......

    I figure not too many other turners are combining an exercise program with shop time.......but, that's ok......I'm used to being the odd-ball anyway! :D

    Maybe brewing up a "cup of joe" would work for some of the rest of you turners.....? I do this occasionally, myself!

    ko
     

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  14. odie

    odie

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    Check weights for your digital postal scale........

    These cheap digital postal scales are making it possible to accurately measure weight loss for seasoning roughed bowls.....on a budget.

    It really doesn't matter about absolute accuracy with these scales.....the object is to consistently and accurately measure the loss of weight, rather than the actual weight......up until the point where the weight is stabilized. You don't need to know the actual weight, just that you can accurately measure the weight loss, and stabilization.

    One quick way to assure your scale is consistently weighing the same each time, is to use something (the same something) each and every time you turn on the scale. I use three chunks of metal......55 grams, 245 grams, and 745 grams. I usually quick check all three.....only takes a few seconds to do. If all three check out to the established weight, I can trust my scale.....and my calculations that stabilization has occurred.

    ko
     

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  15. Jamie Straw

    Jamie Straw

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    Turning Ring ...

    Pete, can you provide a link for turning rings? Unfortunately, Google returns relate to the process of turning a ring.
     
  16. odie

    odie

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    Hi Jamie......I believe this is what Pete had in mind:

    http://www.packardwoodworks.com/Mer...de=packard&Product_Code=112656&Category_Code=

    Here is something very similar:

    https://www.woodturnerscatalog.com/p/109/5503/Turners-Select-Modular-Faceplate-System-3"-Faceplate

    Instead of remounting to chuck jaws, the modular faceplate system has a threaded hub:

    https://www.woodturnerscatalog.com/p/109/5504/Turners-Select-Modular-Faceplate-System-Threaded-Hub

    ko
     
  17. Pete Blair

    Pete Blair

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    Rings

    HI Jamie.
    Here is a link to the ones I bought. I just love them. I have 8 and mounted each to a glue block which I can then glue to my piece. As stated it lets me move them from my oneway to my Rikon and to my internal sander which uses glass and marbles to finish the inside of some of my hollow forms and other pieces.
    http://www.teknatool.com/products/chuck_accessories/faceplate.htm
     
  18. odie

    odie

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    Merry Christmas! :D

    When truing up a surface, it's not always easy to tell by feel when you've completely trued it up. It's helpful to use a pencil to mark the surface. (I normally use an ebony pencil for this.) Do it at slow speed, and allow the pencil to move with the uneven surface. It's easy to see your progress, and when the surface still needs further work. When the pencil marking is gone, you're done.....:cool:

    As an example, the first photo shows the entire surface marked with the ebony pencil. This is done solely for example, and most of the time, only a portion of the surface needs to be marked. If the rim, or the foot of a bowl is the object, only that area needs to be marked. In those areas of interest, the entire pencil markings need to be removed for the surface to be perfectly flat.

    The second photo shows the surface in progress. Theoretically, a third photo would show the surface with the pencil markings entirely removed.

    ko
     

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    Last edited: Dec 26, 2015
  19. hockenbery

    hockenbery AAW Advisor Staff Member

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    The dark pencil is great if you are removing the whole surface layer.
    Airbrushing the surface works too I sometimes use that as guide in removing some surface layers.
    Chalk is great for marking a small bump inside a bowl. If there is any chalk left it will blow of with compressed air.
    Water color pencil is great for making lines to carve etc. if I miss the line a bit the carving will still look good once I use a damp paper towel to erase the line.
     
  20. odie

    odie

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    No, not at all.....you must apply a little "vision" to the post, Al.......

    The photos above are specific to the technique, and the entire area is covered only to more clearly understand the technique. Since that is the top, or the rim of the bowl, the usual application would be to only use the pencil for outermost 1", or so. When roughing a foot, the same applies for only that area where the foot will be......it is a very "target specific" technique.

    ko
     

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