Useful shop gadgets.....shop, and "evolving shop" photos......

Discussion in 'Tutorials and Tips' started by odie, Jan 26, 2013.

  1. hockenbery

    hockenbery AAW Advisor Staff Member

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    Kelly,

    I don't understand your comment.

    Do you put dark pencil/ prisma color on a surface you do not turn or sand away?
     
  2. Owen Lowe

    Owen Lowe

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    Speaking of using pencils on turnings:
    When I will be pyro or carving a piece and sketch the design on the surface, I’ve found that a #2 pencil is too hard and will leave small indentations in the wood if I need to redraw a line or miss the mark in pyro/carving. A 2B or 3B is much softer and leaves a darker line to follow. It erases well or is easily removed with denatured alcohol.

    The chalk is a really good idea — I’ll have to give that a try. (I’d assume any chalk remaining in the grain that is not blown out would be sanded away anyway.)
     
  3. odie

    odie

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    Al.....The short answer is.....no. There is no need to apply the pencil where that surface doesn't need to be trued.....such as the interior surface of a bowl, or that which is outside of the foot of a bowl. It's simply an aid for completely truing up a surface (or portions thereof) while removing as little material as possible. I have edited my post #238 in an attempt to make things more understandable for you.....otherwise, bring it up in the main forum....I'll be happy to discuss it with you there.

    Here is a movable tool holder made from magnets and a piece of PVC pipe. I made this up sometime in the past year, and it's really handy when that time comes when it fits the situation perfectly.......:D I have one other on-the-lathe tool holder (shown on the first pic) that is in constant use, but there are times when another tool holder that can be quickly mounted anywhere can be great to have.

    ko
     

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    Last edited: Dec 27, 2015
  4. Bill Boehme

    Bill Boehme Administrator Staff Member

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    If I use a lead pencil (meaning graphite), I will use a mechanical pencil with a 0.5 or 0.3 mm lead and a softer lead as you stated. I prefer 2B if I can find it.

    I prefer colored leads as they are easier to see and they don't smear like the graphite does.
     
  5. James Seyfried

    James Seyfried

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    Janet, what is the purpose of the unrelated links you add to your replies with quotes?
     
  6. Bill Boehme

    Bill Boehme Administrator Staff Member

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    Thanks for the heads up, James. Unsolicited advertising in the body of a post is against forum rules.
     
  7. Owen Lowe

    Owen Lowe

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    The IKEA LED lights were mentioned a while back in this thread but I wanted to show how I use mine. This is not my own idea.

    1 metric cap screw from Ace Hardware ($.75)
    IKEA Jansjo worklamp ($10)
    Harbor Freight indicator magnet (Item #5645; usually on sale at $13)
    Purpleheart blocks from scrap

    So, for less than $25 per light and about an hour to do a couple of these I have easily positioned work lights at the lathe or wherever there is a metal mounting surface. AND, on a lathe with rounded surfaces, like the head and tailstock on Oneways these magnetic blocks are just the ticket. The most difficult part is accurately drilling the spacing for the pair of mounting holes for the light. Think it through and use dial calipers to scribe the positions on the wood block.
     

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  8. odie

    odie

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    Nice job of it Owen......thanks for contributing. :D

    I have the exact same two components, but not done nearly as nicely as you did. I taped the IKEA lamp to the vertical post of the magnetic base, and it's now on top of my grinder. Makes a great lamp for observing gouges being ground, besides the obvious use on top of your headstock. :cool:

    ko
     
  9. Owen Lowe

    Owen Lowe

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    Thanks, Odie.

    I just looked at the pic of the assembled light and it appears to be levitating from the lathe… cool! (Trust me, it doesn’t really levitate.)
     
  10. odie

    odie

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    I have no trouble using gouges all the way down to where the flute grind gradually curves up......but, I've always had trouble using up all the available surface of scrapers. This is because at some point, the Wolverine platform interferes. For much of my scraper use, I use 1/2" square M2 Sorby scrapers, and I've recently made up a handy little alternative handle that allows me to use more of the steel. I'll probably use this handle for years, because I have a quite a few pieces of short 1/2" M2 square stock available that can be utilized.

    The handle is simply a piece of PVC that has an "X" cut into the end, on my table saw. The scraper end piece is slipped into the end and tightened with a hose clamp that I've modified with a penny for quick on and off. The handle is wrapped with hockey tape to allow for a better grip.

    The short piece of steel is easily maneuverable on the wolverine platform for re-newing the ground burr, and if a raised burr is required, the handle is re-installed for that purpose.

    Making up an auxiliary handle will allow using a couple more inches of that very expensive steel.......:cool:

    ko
     

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    Last edited: Jan 13, 2016
  11. odie

    odie

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    Spindle extension

    When I need it, this 6" spindle extension is golden! It is threaded for 1 1/4" x 8tpi, female on one end, and male on the other. The usual scenario, is those times when access to the area around the foot is needed.....most often for power sanding. Those who are not faceplate turners, probably won't find this as appealing as I do......:p

    Unfortunately, this handy little item is no longer available. It was available about 25 years ago at CSUSA. If one were creative, and knew someone who had a metal lathe, it wouldn't be difficult to make........

    ko
     

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  12. hockenbery

    hockenbery AAW Advisor Staff Member

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    If you google spindle extender a lot of hits pop up
    Packard has them in 3" lengths. This seems long enough of the access you describe. Two could be joined to gether.

    http://www.packardwoodworks.com/Merchant2/merchant.mvc?Screen=CTGY&Category_Code=lathes-acc-spiext

    Also Hartville, hold fast, and Best wood
     
    Last edited: Feb 29, 2016
  13. Bill Boehme

    Bill Boehme Administrator Staff Member

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    Best Wood Tools has a three inch extension which also has a #2 Morse taper in addition to the threads which could be a handy feature.
     
  14. odie

    odie

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    OK, thanks Bill and Al....... This will be useful information, just in case anyone would like to have one of these extensions. Yes, I think a 3" extension would be adequate for most applications. If more reach were needed, they could be stacked, as you indicated.

    I should note that the extensions are not really intended for lathe tool work, but more useful for light duty applications, such as sanding and polishing.

    ko
     
  15. Jim Chrisawn

    Jim Chrisawn

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    Tools on the go

    I, like others, I'm sure have more than one lathe. It seemed every time I was at one lathe I needed a tool that was somewhere else. Now I admit it was kind of tempting to use this as a reason (not excuse) to buy extra tools, however reason prevailed (read here wife intervention) Another solution was to make the tool come to me. Tools on the go. Here is a work in evolutionary development. It is simple, inexpensive and let's me keep the normally needed tools at hand.
    image.jpg
     

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  16. odie

    odie

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    Excellent, Jim.....thanks for contributing. That's one of the better organized rolling carts I've seen.......:D I'm sure a few others will be inspired to take your cue! I only have one lathe, but the concept of a rolling cart is very appealing, nonetheless......

    Just the other day, after having some of my tool handles wrapped with hockey stick tape for the last year or so, I decided to do all of them! I originally bought the hockey tape to wrap some of my exercise and weight lifting equipment, and it worked so well there, that I experimented with using it on my lathe tools, as well as various other applications throughout the shop. It gives just a little more positive grip feel than bare wood and/or with grooves. Now I'm hooked on this. I'm mixing the colors up a bit, so that identification is easier.

    Have you ever sharpened a tool and then changed your mind? If you'll notice, there are several tools with spring clips attached to them. I've been using this idea for a long time. The spring clips indicate a tool that hasn't been used, or barely used, since it was last sharpened......it's my reminder that I can choose this tool and go right to the lathe with it, skipping my usual sharpening procedure. I don't know if this is something anyone else can use, but it's been a very useful idea for my turning, that has withstood the test of time! :cool:

    The first photo shows my most often used tools with the hockey tape. The second photo shows my lesser used tools with my stash of spring clips.

    ko
     

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    Last edited: Mar 7, 2016
  17. Gerald Lawrence

    Gerald Lawrence

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    mobile

    Here is my contribution to mobile. Have 4 drawers on the front and larger storage at bottom. It is also a sharpening station and have since added buffer in the back.
    IMG_5250.jpg

    Usually only use 2-3 tools on one project so they fit here when in use and then go to the wall rack.
     
  18. Jim Chrisawn

    Jim Chrisawn

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    Hockey tape and spring clips...
    Great ideas! My son has a ton of hockey tape and lots of colors. I'm going to try that and the spring clips as well. Great, and thanks!
     
  19. odie

    odie

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    In accordance with the thread title, here's a couple "evolving shop" photos.....

    1. Woodfast lathe
    2. Buffing station


    ko
     

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  20. odie

    odie

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    Here's a couple more:

    1. Delta 8" slow speed grinder
    2. Work bench

    If you've got some "evolving shop" photos.......bring it on! :D

    ko
     

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