Useful shop gadgets.....shop, and "evolving shop" photos......

Discussion in 'Tutorials and Tips' started by odie, Jan 26, 2013.

  1. chrisdaniels

    chrisdaniels

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    here's my "evolving shop" it's my porch, and it changes about every other week. Once I find a configuration I like, I find another reason to change it.
    IMG_1446.jpg

    I have changed it again since that picture was taken, i'll have to post the new one this week.
     
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  2. Mike Johnson

    Mike Johnson

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    Someone needs to pen a new book called square foot woodworking. :D
    Every vertical and horizontal square foot of surface counts in a small shop area.
     
  3. Steve Worcester

    Steve Worcester Admin Emeritus

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    Tinyshop, coming to the DIY network soon
     
  4. Bart Leetch

    Bart Leetch

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    Some woodworkers just have 2 sq,feet.
     
  5. taxman

    taxman

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    Hi Syd,
    Loved the lazy Susan tool holder. please post, or send, the details.
     
  6. taxman

    taxman

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    Enjoyed the many suggestions and pics. Thanks Guys!!
     
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  7. RichColvin

    RichColvin

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    Odie, in our plants, we use a concept called 5s for this. Very similar. Makes things much easier in the long run.

    Also, makes things much more repeatable!
     
  8. odie

    odie

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    Sounds like a good concept, Rich.......but, tell me......what does that "5s" stand for? Is it five s's, or the plural of five?

    Anything that makes you get some round tuits, is a good thing! :D

    ko
     
  9. Bill Boehme

    Bill Boehme Administrator Staff Member

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  10. Mike Johnson

    Mike Johnson

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    The 5s is already outdated, our facility has moved on to the 6s program far better. :rolleyes:

    5s is a program that goes into a work area and streamlines the work area to improve
    the efficiency, time, costs, etc. of any work area. Clean up the area, remove all
    items from the area that are not needed, design a safe work area, reduce the risks in
    the area, etc. The concept was developed in Japan for their business models.
    The 6th element is Safety which has been added to the concept.

     
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  11. RichColvin

    RichColvin

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    Mike is right. I especially like adding the 6th S.
     
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  12. Chuck Lobaito

    Chuck Lobaito

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    Thank you for sharing. I always enjoy learning new ways to reconfigure our shop
     
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  13. odie

    odie

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    Don't know how many turners are using a Veritas, but I suspect not very many! o_O

    My original Veritas was purchased around 1990, or so......and it was made with a single tapered carbide post that was too short to work with the taller 1/2" scrapers. It was on these forums that someone else advised me that the new production Veritas has two carbide tapered posts with different angles, and both are now tall enough to handle the 1/2" scrapers. I have since purchased the newer Veritas, and have been pleased with the raised burs I've been producing. I'm mainly using the more stout looking post with the lesser angle......this one has been working for me quite well. :D

    Anyway, I've discovered that if I mount the old Veritas upside down, this gives me a third distance from the pivot post to the carbide post. This new option isn't used all that much, but when it is.....it's very handy to have. :cool: It gives me a new way to handle short narrow scrapers. You could do the same thing with turning the newer Veritas around, and switching the posts around, I suppose......but, since I had two of them, it works for me!;)

    As you can see, both Veritas jigs are mounted on some scrap wood that fit conveniently between the bedways.....quick on, and quick off! :)

    ko
    IMG_2615.JPG
    IMG_2614.JPG
     
    Last edited: Mar 12, 2017
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  14. odie

    odie

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    It was some time ago there was discussion about how a waxed bowl blank, or a waxed roughed bowl could be marked with information. Just recently, I discovered that Renfrew hockey tape sticks to waxed surfaces, and a sharpie fine point writes on it easily.

    ko
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  15. odie

    odie

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    For anyone having a banjo that doesn't slide as well as it should, I've found that putting some graphite on a rag and applying it to the offset bar helps a lot. After an application, it slides very easily, and is good for a couple of months. Only takes a minute to do this. (I also use it on the drill press main column, so the table goes up and down easier.)

    The graphite powder is cheap, and available here:
    http://www.ebay.com/sch/i.html?_odk....TRS0&_nkw=graphite+powder+locksmith&_sacat=0

    Don't use a wet lubricant, because that will attract sanding dust, and will eventually exacerbate the problem......(don't ask me how I know that!) :rolleyes:

    ko

    IMG_2657.JPG
     
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  16. odie

    odie

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    I've been using these two blocks for quite awhile as sanding supports, and they have been working out very well for that purpose. On three sides I've glued some foam matting for comfort of my hands and wrists. They represent three heights apiece. I cannot begin to tell you how important they have become to my sanding.....having that support greatly increases the effectiveness. (I believe I've showed you these before.)
    IMG_2655.JPG
    Sometime last fall, I made up this tall sanding support, and it's become a great help when sanding at the top of the workpiece. The padded top is offset some, so it can fit between the bedways in two positions. Wish I had this years ago.......but, glad I have it now!
    IMG_2653.JPG
    All the materials were taken from the "scrap bin", so it was free to me......just apply a little imagination!

    (I'm not actually sanding this piece of Ovankol......just using it as a mock-up for the photo.) :D

    ko
     
    Last edited: Mar 11, 2017
  17. James Seyfried

    James Seyfried

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    This little air bag is advertised for leveling cabinets and windows, amongst many uses. When I saw it I instantly thought of struggling with large wood blanks. This little air pump wedge sure makes centering a large piece of wood on the spur chuck a lot easier! It is called a Big Horn 13202 Contractor-grade Air Pump Wedge and rated to lift 300 pounds 2" or so.
    airpump799.jpg
     
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  18. odie

    odie

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    For those who wish to have a nice curved edge on their skews, I've found the Oneway skew jig does a real nice job of it. Of course, you do need the Wolverine V-arm in conjunction with the skew jig. I've heard others say this jig doesn't work, but I'll have to disagree with that assessment! :) I'm using it with the tall point facing the opposite side of the pivot point on the jig, and rocking the skew on the longitudinal axis. Once you get used to it, it's really an easy technique to master very quickly. Use a flat diamond hone to true up the edge several times before you go back to the grinder.
    IMG_2680.JPG
    IMG_2681.JPG IMG_2682.JPG
    ko
     
    Last edited: Mar 15, 2017
  19. Zach LaPerriere

    Zach LaPerriere

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    I need to watch this thread better! My graphite powder didn't perform all that well, but it is mixed with something else—hence my recent post on lubricants.

    Thanks for sharing such great stuff, Odie.
     
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  20. odie

    odie

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    Hey thanks, Zach....... I saw your "holy grail" revelation for the LPS 1 lubricant. Because it's also a dry lubricant, it ought to do pretty well for the banjo offset bar, too! This Chinese graphite works, too......not sure if it's mixed with anything, but I'm assuming it's pure.

    ko
     
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