Useful shop gadgets.....shop, and "evolving shop" photos......

Discussion in 'Tutorials and Tips' started by odie, Jan 26, 2013.

  1. Mike Peace

    Mike Peace

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    Small depth drill

    I tried longer depth drills until I saw Richard Raffan use a short one. Here is mine with a standard size 1/4" drill bit with a few notches to note depth. I use this for shallow bowls but mostly for doing boxes. Probably for 90% of my depth drill tasks. No ferrule since I don't put any lateral pressure on it. After your post with the yellow scoop from HD I went out and got one. Great idea Odie and thanks for sharing. I posted it in my chapter's newsletter.
     

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  2. odie

    odie

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    And, thank you as well for taking the time to input here, Mike........

    The mental "gears" are turning! This is some of the information I was hoping to inspire with this thread......because you've just expanded my horizons just a little bit, and made me a little more versatile in my own shop! :cool2:

    Note that my wooden depth stops are large enough to allow for a two-handed hold on the depth drill.......

    I don't see why a short drill bit couldn't be used, and it may be preferable under some circumstances. As you can see, my 3/16" depth drill is made on a handled key-less chuck.......so, using it to adapt to a shorter drill bit would be a snap for me!

    Without trying it first, it does seem like using some sort of positive depth stop would prevent any accidental variation in how deep the depth hole is drilled. The differences in wood density, and chip resistance in the flutes will undoubtedly cause a need for varying input pressures to do the actual drilling. By using a wooden spacer in conjunction with varying the drill bit within the chuck would allow for an accurate drilling at any prescribed depth.

    As mentioned before, one thing that seems to be related to smaller diameter depth holes, is the hole itself tends to plug with shavings while the interior is being turned. When this happens, it does result in not positively seeing where the hole is while the lathe is in motion...........but, there is no reason why a larger 3/8" diameter, but smaller length drill bit couldn't be used in exactly the same way.......:)

    I'll give this a try......

    Thanks.......:D

    ooc
     

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    Last edited: Feb 9, 2013
  3. odie

    odie

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    Here is another "evolving shop" photo of my work bench.

    These two photos span a decade, or very close to it.....

    The one on the right was taken yesterday, and the one on the left was taken nine years ago. There is a huge difference here, but probably I am the only one who notices all the subtle changes........:D

    ooc
     

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  4. odie

    odie

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    Here is some "evolving shop" photos of my lathe.

    These also span a decade. The biggest difference is the addition of variable speed, but there are many changes over this time period.

    I also took a shot of some "up and coming" bowls that are awaiting wax and polish. A few of these you'll probably eventually see in my gallery.

    Later, friends........:D

    ooc
     

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  5. Grant Wilkinson

    Grant Wilkinson

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    In your third pic, the leftmost piece looks particularly fine,Odie.
     
  6. odie

    odie

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    Thank you, Grant........

    Sometimes Mother Nature plays a leading role in the effort........and she did in that Claro Walnut burl bowl. Matter of fact, that one was a real headache to complete successfully. There were some gaping cracks in the bowl blank, and that radically inward turned rim was a result of eliminating the flaw.

    :D

    ooc
     
  7. Wayne Spence

    Wayne Spence

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    Evolution

    May I suggest the latest in shop evolution and gadgets. It is not the cordless dustpan but the dustpanless cord.
     
  8. dickhob

    dickhob

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    I've filed a notch in the top center of my #1 scroll chuck jaws. When I mount a piece, I put a pencil mark there. It makes for a deadly accurate index for remounting.

    Side note, the red rubber on the shark jaws is what is left from dipping the jaws in that liquid rubber they use to coat tools. I thought it would minimize marking the piece. As I recall it worked pretty well on expansion, not so well on contraction.
    DickHob
     

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  9. Angelo

    Angelo President Emeritus

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    Do it now

    Odie,
    Yep agree with you there
    Thanks for ur insight

    Angelo
     
  10. Bart Leetch

    Bart Leetch

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    That's to bad Odie but it isn't anything a coat of light colored paint wouldn't
    help.
     
  11. Bill Boehme

    Bill Boehme Administrator Staff Member

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    You have a time clock in your shop?? Do you punch in and out to record your shop time? Do you dock yourself for missed time?

    Other than that, I can't tell any difference between the two pictures. :D
     
    Last edited: Feb 17, 2013
  12. Bill Boehme

    Bill Boehme Administrator Staff Member

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    I see one change -- a new ghetto blaster.

    But, also it looks like the same roll of paper towels that was there ten years ago is still there. :D
     
  13. John Lawson

    John Lawson

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    There's one huge difference I see that I've also made. There's lots more stuff on the shelves, but more importantly things are no longer stored in opaque containers but in see-though plastic boxes. In my old shop I had a destructive temperature-humidity problem, and now everything is in stackable plastic food storage containers. Probably not necessary in Texas, but it saved my butt when I accidentally knocked over the shelves the tools and supplies were on.
     
  14. odie

    odie

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    Hello Bart.......

    Painting the walls and ceiling white is one thing I wish I had done when I built this shop.

    ooc

    Yeah, John........

    Those clear plastic containers are a great way to organize, and also see what's inside without having to look! I started using those a few years ago, and now there's a bunch of them in my shop. I also got rid of the metal Folgers coffee containers and now store things in the red plastic Folgers containers.......what the heck, these are FREE, and the lids on the new plastic containers work much better than the lids that used to be on the metal coffee cans! :D

    ooc

    A time clock to punch in and out?????

    Bill, you must be talking about this picture with the used wooden bowl waste block made into a clock face, with only the hour hand.

    Actually, that's on a magnet attached to an automatic lawn watering timer. I have the power to the lathe and compressor on a timer, so that I don't forget to switch them off when I leave the shop.......just a little back-up memory, since I'm very forgetful about these things. :eek:

    If the knobs on the Minarik controller are not completely turned off, extended time with power remaining on could damage the unit.......and, there are air leaks in my air lines that cause the compressor to start up and stop every few hours. I'd rather not have that happen, unless I'm physically present.

    The clock face is my reminder of what time I've set the timer to cut the power. Here, it's 2:30am.......

    ooc
     

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    Last edited: Feb 18, 2013
  15. odie

    odie

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    Here is a little thing I've done that is quick and easy.......

    I've put some scribe marks on the closest bedway that are exactly perpendicular to the axis of the lathe. This allows me to align a straight tool rest to the foot, or face of a bowl when I want to get it positioned as perfectly square as I can.

    Simple really.......Just visualize the tool rest by eye from above, just prior to locking it down. This helps, but from this point forward, it's up to you to make that cut square to the axis of rotation.

    I have a carbide scribe that I made from a used "throw away" metal lathe cutting tool. I scrounged this from my place of work.......we throw away many of these carbide cutters when they are used beyond practical application. I used the scribe, along with a machinist's square on the inside of the bedways to make the markings. The markings are made more visible by using a Sharpie marker on the scribe mark.

    This modification does not effect banjo movement, or it's secure lock-down.

    ooc
     

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    Last edited: Feb 18, 2013
  16. odie

    odie

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    Here is some "evolving shop" photos of the grinders I've used for sharpening lathe tools. The 6" 3450rpm grinder was originally purchased early in the 1980's, and was my first grinder. I used to sharpen tools on this grinder using the originally supplied platform.......what a crude way to grind, as I look back on this.

    The 6" grinder was originally set up for the Wolverine around 1991 or 1992 as best I can recollect. This photo was probably taken around 2005, or so. The wheels were 80gt Norton SG wheels, and worked very well. I still have this grinder, but is now used as a general purpose grinder.

    The Delta 8" slow speed grinder was purchased around 2008, and has been a great boon to my turning efforts. The Norton 80g SG wheels were working so well, that I decided to equip the 8" grinder with the same set of wheels. I wish I hadn't waited so long to upgrade from the 6" grinder, but I suppose my stubbornness is why I didn't do it sooner!

    There are two photos of the Delta 8" grinder. The first photo was shortly after purchasing it, and the next photo was taken a few days ago. There has been so many upgrades to the way my tool sharpening efforts has progressed, that it's hard to recount all the things I've progressed through, in order to arrive at this photo......:)

    ooc
     

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  17. odie

    odie

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    Here is a handy little gadget for the lathe that I'm constantly using. All it is is a piece of scrap lumber that has a proper sized wedge base to fit between the bedways.

    Well, what in the world is it? :confused:

    It's just something to whack your gouge on when shavings get stuck in the flute and obstruct your view of the cutting action. When this happens, give your gouge a little whack, and you're back in business in a millisecond!

    On the bottom side, I've hot glued a couple of magnets, and this allows me to store it to the right side of my controller box, and out of the way when I'm not using it.

    Using it on the lathe has been so handy for my purposes, that I eventually got a bright idea......it naturally fit the same purpose at the grinder. You'll see a small block of wood attached to the right side of the grinder base, in-between the base and the Wolverine V-arm jig lock down mechanism. When metal powder clings to the bevel and flute.......same thing.......just give it a little whack, and the metal powder is gone!

    These "tool whackers" can be made in about ten minutes......and, the time spent is well worth the effort I invested in making them! :D

    edit: I suppose I should note that the wooden block only works well when working with dry, or semi-dry wood. For the hardened crud left by very wet wood, the "gouge whacker" may not do the trick. When it doesn't, use a brass barbecue grill brush to remove built up crud in the flute......brushing from inside the flute towards the cutting edge. With heat and wet shavings, sometimes even the grill brush isn't aggressive enough.......and, in that case, I have a specially re-shaped steel bar (made from an old screwdriver) that can remove the toughest of hardened residue in the flute. When worse comes to worse, and I resort to the altered screwdriver, I also re-sharpen the gouge immediately afterwards.

    ooc
     

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    Last edited: Feb 23, 2013
  18. odie

    odie

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    Getting a nice steady hold on a power sander is darn near an impossibility when it's hand held.

    This little platform is adapted to fit between the bedways. It's quick and easy to make, and it's easy on and off. It gives a solid and steady resting place for your hand while sanding. After having used it for several years, it's something I just couldn't live without! :cool2:

    I have two sizes of "riser blocks" to use in conjunction with the platform, and the six different heights available covers virtually any sanding situation.

    Not only is the sanding platform used for power sanding, it's a boon to hand held sandpaper, as well......your fingers will be mighty glad you have this!

    Not much to say about it......very simple, simple to make, but major advantages to your convenience and style.

    ooc
     

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  19. odie

    odie

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    The "evolving shop".......

    This Craftsman 2hp 20gal compressor served me well for 20+ years.......and, was still running fine when I sold it. The trouble with such a small tank, is whenever I needed a constant supply of air for air powered tools and chip removal, the darn thing ran constantly......all that constant noise was challenging my sanity! For what it was, I thought highly of it, though.

    I replaced the Craftsman compressor, with this Campbell-Hausfield 80gal, 4hp Husky Pro about five years ago. What a difference! It was difficult to justify the purchase......but, like all things of this nature, once the cost is absorbed, the damage to your wallet is never given a second thought.........and happiness about what you've been able to acquire, and what it can do for you is the whole point. :D

    ooc
     

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    Last edited: Feb 23, 2013
  20. odie

    odie

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    More of the "evolving shop"..........

    Having a little removable platform for the lathe is a really handy thing.

    My "working platform" started out as just a flat sheet of plywood, and that was good......but, it has evolved into something better......much better!

    Added are a couple of cradles for close quarters drill/sanders a few years ago. What an improvement that was! :D

    ooc
     

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