Useful shop gadgets.....shop, and "evolving shop" photos......

Discussion in 'Tutorials and Tips' started by odie, Jan 26, 2013.

  1. odie

    odie

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    Hi Mike........

    Well, you've inspired me to change one of my depth drills to a shorter drill. The 3/16" drill never did work all that well anyway, because the hole was too small......plugged up too easily while the lathe was running and when that happened, I couldn't see where the bottom of the hole was.

    Solution.......larger 3/8" drill bit, but I substituted a shorter, regular length bit.

    I tried this out this afternoon, and am very happy with the result. I'll be using the shorter drill bit quite a bit more often than the longer one.......depth limitation is around 3", which covers about 80 percent of the bowl blanks that I've been purchasing.

    Thanks to you, this particular aspect of bowl turning is now just a little bit better than before. :cool2:

    The longer depth drill will still be used for those very deep bowl blanks that I'm able to get occasionally..........great!

    ooc
     

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  2. odie

    odie

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    Update..........

    Two reasons I didn't like the commercial depth stop for a woodturning depth drill, is it isn't adjustable without tools, and the set screw tends to mar the flutes of the drill when used repeatedly.

    I used the same depth stop shown in the photo above, but altered the screw to adjust by hand. I also rounded and smoothed the other end on the 3M deburr wheel, so that it won't mar the flutes of the drill bit.

    Also, I embedded the commercial drill stop into a block of wood for two reasons........to get a larger "footprint" of the stop to the bowl blank, and to recess the contact surface to allow for shavings to not interfere with an accurate depth hole.

    I've said before that it's important to not give up on making your little inventions work perfectly, and it may take several attempts to make it work right.......this is a good example of that philosophy.......:cool2:

    ooc
     

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  3. odie

    odie

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    Mounting wood to a chuck, whether the chuck is already screwed onto the spindle, or is on your bench-top, is much more "user-friendly", and efficient since making a few homemade attachments that help immensely.

    The "T" handle chuck key has been modified with a revolving hand hold, made from a scrap piece of walnut. (This is simple to make, if you have a lathe......:D) The mating surface on the chuck key shaft has been highly polished, so that the Walnut piece revolves effortlessly. The 3M deburr wheel is great for doing the polishing.

    If the chuck is on your bench-top, a chuck caddy is the way to go! The one on the left photo has been modified with a base that overlaps the edge of the bench-top. This makes for a stable base that stays put, while clamping the jaws to your workpiece.......without the need for a third hand!

    The chuck caddies also protect the threads, and mating surfaces of chuck to spindle. They are easily made, and on the right is a picture of one without a chuck, to see their basic construction. Very simple to make, and very useful for one specific purpose in the shop......

    ooc
     

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    Last edited: Mar 3, 2013
  4. odie

    odie

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    I used to have trouble with thin wall bowls vibrating when doing the foot, and that problem has been solved with a set-screw installed between the Oneway Stronghold chuck body and the scroll. As it was, it required too much pressure to insure the chuck would hold with speed. The pressure on the bowl was the source, or cause of the vibrations I had been experiencing. Now, with the addition of the set-screw, only light pressure on the bowl is required for a hold that won't budge.....and after doing this modification several years ago, I don't recall ever again having the vibration problems I once was plagued with when doing the footing on thin wall bowls.

    :cool2:

    ooc
     

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  5. odie

    odie

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    There are two things in this photo that other turners might find of interest.

    The mounted laser pointer is useful for pinpointing a specific location on the bowl while the lathe is in motion. If you match your tool "wake" to the red laser dot, you can work on any specific location you choose......no guessing!

    :cool2:


    There is a fixed air line coming up through the bottom of the photo to the interior of the bowl. The line is mounted, and flexible. If you do any bowls with inward slanting walls, you know that stopping frequently to eliminate built up shavings caught by the walls causes you to stop frustratingly often to eject the shavings. With the air line pointing into the interior, this problem is completely solved.

    :cool2: :cool2:

    ooc
     

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  6. odie

    odie

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    Grinder organization is important to keeping a good keen edge......and quickly renewing that edge is equally as important. Everything organized and handy is a benefit to those ends.......

    There is a large 600gt diamond plate.

    Two small diamond credit card plates. 600gt and 1200gt

    Two large slipstones.

    Two small slipstones.

    Two wheel dressers, diamond and composite.

    Two brass wire brushes.

    One nylon bristle brush.

    Home made flute pick and scraper.

    Three vari-grind depth gauges.

    Two 600gt diamond cones.

    One 600gt straight diamond 1/4" bar.

    One 3M pad for cleaning tool shanks.





    ooc
     

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  7. Ricc Havens

    Ricc Havens

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    Thanks Odie

    Odie, i just want to say thanks. I keep checking back to this thread and as a novice turner I really appreciate and enjoy seeing the pics and ideas you keep adding.

    Thanks
    Ricc Havens
    Elkhart, IN
     
  8. odie

    odie

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    You are certainly welcome, Ricc.........

    Not everything I find useful will be equally as useful to everyone else, but I hope some of my thoughts and ideas might help out a few other turners. Hopefully, a few other turners will add to this thread.........already, I've modified my own procedures and tools, as a result of this thread alone!

    Just so happens, I'm in the process of adding to this thread right now........another one coming right up, so stay tuned! :D

    ooc
     
    Last edited: Mar 10, 2013
  9. odie

    odie

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    Chuck jaw gauges.......

    These gauges have been so useful to me, that I can't imagine myself not having them........and, how I ever got along without them is a mystery! :D

    When I want to match a spigot or recess to any specific set of jaws, it's so simple to do......just match the arrow on the end of the scale to one side of the spigot/recess and read which jaw set fits...........or, know how much to cut to get to the jaw set you prefer.

    The spigot jig is measured from right to left, and the recess jig is measured from left to right. There really wasn't any reason for doing it this way. It was strictly arbitrary and I wasn't really considering it when I made up the second jig......either way is ok, if you prefer one direction over the other.

    I use Oneway Stronghold chucks, so you'll have to make them up to suit your own equipment and tools. You'll notice a small area that's colored red.......this is important. With my Oneway jaw sets there is a small area where NONE of the jaws covers this size of spigot or recess. It's really frustrating to cut a spigot and sometime down the road, discover that there isn't any jaws that will fit! :mad: I believe it was this specific thing that originally inspired me to make these up.......and, there has been nothing but perfection since that time! :cool2:

    You will also notice that some sizes of spigots/recesses will be covered by more than one set of jaws. This is good to know, because unless you have ten chucks, you're going to have to change jaws out........sometimes there will be no need to do that, if an alternate set of jaws just happens to already be installed. Normally, I mark the roughed bowl with the jaw size using an Ebony pencil.........that way, I have a reference without the need to measure again at some later date. That is, I mark all bowls with the appropriate jaw size, except number 2 standard jaws......which I don't mark. The number two jaws are, by far, the most used jaw size, so I mark everything else, and know that if it isn't marked, it's going to be number two standard jaws.

    ooc
     

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    Last edited: Mar 9, 2013
  10. odie

    odie

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    Thanks to Al Hockenbery........

    It was six or seven years ago that I enquired on this forum for good methods to mark information on roughed bowls for seasoning.......and, thanks to Al, he introduced me to Ebony pencils for this purpose.

    For many years, I had been using peel and stick labels for this purpose.......but, that wasn't satisfactory because often times the labels couldn't be relied upon to stay put. It was pretty frustrating to lose this information........:mad:

    Although the Ebony pencils do work excellently for lighter colored bowls, they are hard to read on dark grained wood species.

    The solution to writing on dark grained bowls is an artist's white charcoal pencil.

    Both pencils work well on roughed bowls with high moisture content, and are unaffected by wax sealant solutions.

    The Ebony pencil and white charcoal pencils are available at an art supply store.



    ooc
     

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    Last edited: Mar 15, 2013
  11. Dave F.

    Dave F.

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    Great tip, thank you sir.

    Dave F.
     
  12. Bill Weaver

    Bill Weaver

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    Odie,
    I noticed you are numbering your bowls, may I ask how you are using the number?

    Thanks
    Bill
     
  13. odie

    odie

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    You bet, Dave.......

    The artist's charcoal pencils are available in a variety of colors. Don't know if there are any other applications for other colors.....but just putting it out there, in case anyone can think of any.......:confused:

    I don't think the ebony pencil is available in anything but jet black.

    ooc

    Bill........

    I'm running a list of things I intend to add to this thread, and the bowl numbering system I use is directly related to my way of organizing the inventory in my shop.

    Guess I ought to do that next........:D

    Look for it in the next few days....... Basically.....(with some exceptions), every bowl blank gets a number when it's received. It is tracked throughout it's progress in the shop, up until it's completed. In this process, I'm adding notations as progress continues. My completed bowls are not in numerical order.

    I believe some turners apply a number only when their bowl is finished. There is an advantage to that, in that should a turner's works ever become collectible, there is some reference point as to the chronology of when that particular piece was produced........

    .......I could care less about that. All I'm interested in organizing data in a way that allows me to store, retrieve, reference, contemplate......and evaluate information.

    ooc
     
  14. Dave F.

    Dave F.

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    I now number each piece of wood when I get it. The number is recorded in a log book with the date and moisture tested with a meter. In the past when I turned it the number was lost and the story of the wood was forgotten. Now, with the use of grease pencils that number can be added right through to the finished piece. I may just burn the number in the bottom of the piece so can complete the journey.

    I've enjoyed going to the shed and finding a piece of wood to work on, then looking up the number. Remembering either harvesting the wood or who gave it to me brings back good memories.

    Dave F.
     
  15. odie

    odie

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    Dave.......I believe your method of recording numbers in a log book is a good way to go. This is because a bowl can be looked up by number at a later date. I haven't been doing this, but I may in the future. Thanks for the suggestion. :cool2:

    For my turnings, the bowl number and species of the wood is on a sticker applied to the foot when the bowl is finished, but not burned into the bowl itself. I did burn the identification number into the bowl for a short time, and didn't like the way it looked. To my thinking, the overall impression I wish to convey is best served by simply applying my personal logo to the bottom.

    I have seen some turners burn numbers, date, signatures, species, etc., into their bowls........and, to me, that sort of thing only detracts from the overall impression of professionalism. (To do more than simple identification of the artist is a bit presumptuous, and makes it look more like crafts show stuff, if you ask me.....:rolleyes:)

    ooc
     

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    Last edited: Mar 23, 2013
  16. Bill Weaver

    Bill Weaver

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    very interesting thought Odie. I on the other hand have been asked to burn in name or initials and date of piece from relatives and friends.
    I guess if selling them it would be better not to date them. Am i thinking along the same lines as you?
     
  17. odie

    odie

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    I'm not sure that we are, Bill........

    From my point of view, this is strictly a matter of appearance for gallery sales.......and my own personal opinion about what reflects a more refined impact on the customers who frequent art galleries. Obviously my opinion isn't going to cover everyone who might be a potential buyer, but the actual percentages of who would be influenced by my philosophy on this, is a matter of speculation. The date isn't there, but with the sticker intact, the end purchaser will know what kind of wood it is. I have had galleries remove the sticker and apply their own, but the number and species is always recorded into their inventory........so, the purchaser will have that information.

    We all know that when someone first looks at your bowls, nearly every time with few exceptions, they will want to know what kind of wood it is. There was also a time when I experimented with burning in the species, but my conclusion on this was the same. Simplicity, or the KISS principle guides my perceptions of what a professional appearance entails.

    All of this, is strictly an opinion on my part, and it is not intended to be a statement about what another turner decides to do with their own works. I stress that I am only expressing an opinion, and there is no right or wrong in it as applied to anyone else.

    If someone wanted me to burn information into a bowl, I WOULD DO IT. Seldom does anyone have that opportunity, because usually the end user doesn't have any idea who I am, and neither the opportunity to talk to me prior to finishing a bowl.

    ooc

    .
     
    Last edited: Mar 23, 2013
  18. odie

    odie

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    From past interaction with other turners, I have a strong feeling that most turners of present day are inventorying their bowls by a computer program. I haven't specifically used a computer program to inventory my bowls, but I have used one for another purpose.

    I first began inventorying my turnings long before there was ever a computer in my household. Back in the beginning, I believe I used a journal type of book form entry method, but soon after that, started using 4x6 file cards and a file card box. Now I have three file card boxes........I suppose you could say that since I'm using a system that works very well for my purposes, I have no strong desires to change horses in mid-stream!

    Nothing against computer programs, but there is one thing that seems less advantageous about them.......and, that is few of us are likely to have a computer in our shop. Because of that, there is a disconnect between the need to record/access information, and the ability to do it on the same time line.

    ............................

    As mentioned earlier, when I receive a bowl blank, it gets a 4x6 file card and a number immediately. The date received, source, cost + shipping cost, size, species, and moisture content are all recorded on the card. This is normally the only time I use the moisture meter, and this one time is only done to provide initial information which is used to determine a strategy. If it is determined that seasoning by monthly weighings is indicated, my basic formula for concluding that MC stabilization has occurred, is to record three consecutive months of the same weight. Sometimes more, depending......but, the formula seems to be a good overall blueprint for success.......

    Depending on MC and other factors, the bowl blank may be roughed after a short acclamation period, or it may be stored for some future time for turning. Basically, if the MC is 12 percent, or under, I'll be in no hurry to finish it off......and, it becomes part of a growing inventory of "future bowl blanks". If the MC is 12-14 percent, and depending on a number of factors, I may decide to rough it out, with or without anchorseal.....but still no hurry, since the MC is low. If the MC is 16 percent or more, I usually rough it out and completely anchorseal it within a month.

    The file card is dated at the time of roughing it out.......and the seasoning process begins with monthly weighings, all of which are recorded.

    When the MC has stabilized, a waste block is installed (I'm a faceplate user), the roughed bowl becomes part of an inventory of bowls ready for final turning. Of this stock of prepared roughed bowls, and among those bowl blanks with less than 12 percent MC.......I pick and choose which will be next to become a completed bowl.

    During the time the bowl is in process of finishing it off, I am making notations, and little drawings indicating flaws and what was done to address them, as well as sanding progress information. If epoxy was used, that is noted. If the height, or shape was necessarily altered outside the game plan, that is noted, too. Often times, progress is interrupted during the sanding phase, and it's very helpful to have information on what grit was used, and where it was used, when I return to work.

    When a bowl is completed, I date the card and enter the final size. Quite frequently, the final size, and the original size are very different. This is because we all have to deal with flaws in the wood, and my preferred method is not to repair cracks and flaws when they can be eliminated.......thus, a smaller size.

    Since my sales are infrequent, I see bowls that are less than the best I have, as an opportunity to continually practice techniques and shapes, without using up all my best bowl blanks. These are a great source of give-away bowls......and I have literally given hundreds of these bowls to co-workers, and to the ladies at my church.......and, offered others for donations to the church. (killing two birds with one stone? :D) Many of these bowls are never photographed.

    Anyway, the file card index is a method that your Grandpappy might have used, and it's still a very excellent method of inventory. I have three file card boxes, and they are for:

    A) work in progress
    B) roughed bowls ready for final turning
    C) completed bowls on hand, accounts/bowls sold, bowls given away.

    ooc

    OK, OK.....I know that very few of you ever got down to the bottom of this post......but, I thought I might spend the effort to explain a few things to the very few who did.......:D


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  19. Steve Worcester

    Steve Worcester Admin Emeritus

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    Light wood, Sharpies and then wax over them, dark wood... we don't get anything that dark. Walnut the darkest and Sharpies work on that too.
     
  20. odie

    odie

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    Hi Steve.......

    The reason I don't use a sharpie for marking wood, is because it penetrates, and is permanent. This will result in a net loss of wood to the level required to remove it.

    ooc
     

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