Useful shop gadgets.....shop, and "evolving shop" photos......

Discussion in 'Tutorials and Tips' started by odie, Jan 26, 2013.

  1. Glen Perye

    Glen Perye

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    What I use on the blanks and assorted chunks of wood is a Bic correction pen. It doesn't penetrate, it will go over wax, works on light or dark. And the numbers are from Wood Crafts list that came with pen blank assortment years ago. This way I didn't have to come up with a new system. :D

    The Bic correction pen idea is from Don Ward and his new pen making book!
     

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  2. odie

    odie

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    Hi Glen.......

    Thanks for this idea.

    Both the Ebony pencil and the white charcoal pencils work very well, but neither work over wax. There are times where this would be an added convenience for my purposes.......specifically when I receive a bowl block that is already treated with wax. For this, I've been using a sticker with the information stapled to the very corner of the block, so that it will be removed when it's band sawed round. The correction pen would be a better solution.

    When a bowl block is roughed to bowl shape for seasoning, the Ebony and charcoal pencils work fine, since it's bare wood prior to sealing with anchorseal over the top of the markings.

    I'll want to get one of the Bic correction pens for my own use, because I see a definite use for them. There is a Staples store here.......can I get one there?

    ooc

    I just ran a search for the Bic correction pen, and Staples, among many other places does indeed have it.......I'll get one!

    Thanks......:D

    click:
    http://www.staples.com/Bic+correction+pen/directory_Bic+correction+pen

    ooc

    .
     
  3. Glen Perye

    Glen Perye

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    The only things I will add to the use of the correction pens. Shake well if the instructions say to any brand should work They were out of the store brand and I didn't want to use the brush in cap to write on small pen blanks! ;)
    You will have to develop a light touch when writing on wax, as to much pressure will scrape up the wax. You will have to clean off the tip when writing on wax after a couple times. I bought the two pack and switch off when doing a lot of blanks.

    I also squeeze it so the flow is a little on the heavy side, as you can then write on top of the wax. It does take a little practice to get the hang of using them but, the learning curve isn't real steep.:D
     
  4. odie

    odie

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    OK, got one......er, two of them in a package.

    I've already tried it out, and I can see why your writing looks so big.......it is what it is. I'm not sure this will replace the stickers fastened with a staple, but it's good to know this capability is there when needed. Takes about ten minutes to dry, so no touching!. There are times when I want to add information to roughed and anchorsealed bowls, and staples are a no-no.......the correction pen will be perfect for that.

    Thanks Glen.......

    ooc
     
    Last edited: Mar 24, 2013
  5. Tom Coghill

    Tom Coghill

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    Stronghold Wrench - Jumbo Jaws

    Attached are 4 photos that show the problem I was having and how I easily solved that problem:

    Photo 1 – Problem
    I found when using my Stronghold chuck and a large set of Cole Jaws (these were home made that expand to 23.95 inches, mounted to the Stronghold flat jaws) I was having a space conflict with the T-bar handle. :mad: Usually when mounting something in these jumbo sized jaws, one needs a hand on the object to be turned and one to tighten the jaws. With the T-bar conflicting with the jaws, this became overly complex and time consuming due to the T-bar not fitting behind the jaws (see photo 1).

    Photo 2 – Wrench Top
    The obvious solution is to get a longer wrench. When looking at the wrench, I found that the round top of the wrench was just slightly larger than a 14 mm 6 point socket. So I went to the grinder and flattened out the sides to match the 14 mm socket. This took a minimal amount of grinding (one must sneak up on it like fitting a lid to a turned box). When I was done fitting the socket, I painted the top of the wrench with a bit of flat black paint to match the existing wrench color (see photo 2). :D

    Photo 3 – Extension
    With the T-bar removed, I can now fit a 14 mm socket to the top of the Stronghold Wrench and with a single hand I can tighten or loosen the jumbo jaws quickly (see photo 3).

    Photo 4 – Complete Wrench with T-bar in Place
    The best part of this modification is that the regular T-bar can still be used as designed. Only when the extension is needed does one need to remove the T-bar. No extra pieces and a very minimal amount of modification to the existing wrench! (see photo 4)

    If you have also encountered this problem, consider this solution.

    Problem solved, time to get back to turning! :cool2:
     

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  6. odie

    odie

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    Flammable waste storage......

    If you don't have a safe place to store oily rags, finish rags, paper towels used with flammables, etc., a metal paint can will serve this purpose well. Empty weekly with regular garbage pick up.

    These cans are available at the hardware store for around a buck......believe I got this one at Home Depot. I put a small drawer pull knob in the lid to make access handy. Stays on top of the work bench.

    ooc

    .
     

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    Last edited: Apr 13, 2013
  7. odie

    odie

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    Use a paper veil for matching the existing grind of any gouge to your grinding wheel.

    At one time, I was using jigs to set up a grind to a gouge.....not any more! I can match the existing grind to match the wheel in seconds. This is a little trick I learned by observing creative techniques of people where I work, who do hand finishing work on medical instruments.

    You can make a perfect match of the existing gouge grind, and it matters not if a straight grind via the V-arm, or Vari-grind attachment of the Wolverine is being used. Simply place a plain white piece of paper between the light source, the profile of the gouge/wheel, and your eye. Takes only seconds for a perfect match. Or, you can lengthen/shorten the bevel angle by varying the match of the two surfaces......up to you!

    In the side view photo, I left a little gap there to clearly see the two surfaces.....for illustration purposes. You can match the two profiles exactly, or reduce the bevel angle by grinding slightly more on the back of the heel. This lengthens the bevel. In the photo, if you were to grind it this way, by grinding slightly more on the front of the bevel towards the cutting edge, you can enlarge the angle, or shorten the bevel. It all depends on your needs of the moment.

    The paper veil is attached to the side of the grinder shield via a magnet. The little wire handle with wooden knob is there simply to make things a bit easier for me, but not necessary for the purpose function.

    Once this method is accustomed to........set up is only seconds of time, and you have the freedom of accurately adjusting the bevel angle to your needs. I imagine there will be those who are using jigs and set in their ways.......this is fine, but a few of you might be inclined to give this method a try. Some may like it, some may not.......but, I won't be going back to jigs that vary depending on wheel diameter, and take a bit more guesswork in order to adjust the angle to a specific need.



    ooc
     

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    Last edited: Apr 15, 2013
  8. Kevin Miller

    Kevin Miller

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    Funny this is the first thing I read after joining the forum today!

    I literally JUST bought one of these pans this past weekend at my local HD and you're right. They are awesome.

    EDIT: Sorry, I was replying to the post about the yellow freestanding dust pan from Odie at the beginning of the thread. Didn't realize it would throw my reply to the bottom of the thread. I should have quoted it. Sorry everyone.

    Kevin
     
  9. odie

    odie

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    No sweatski, Kevin......

    Most will know what you're talking about, but here's the pic of the big yellow dustpan again. I haven't used anything else since I bought mine.......the most handy thing it's turned out to be, especially for the piles of shavings a woodturner creates! :D

    2/25/17.....nearly 4 years later. That big yellow dustpan is still in everyday use!

    ooc
     

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    Last edited: Feb 25, 2017
  10. odie

    odie

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    The trouble with those cone diamond hones......

    Good morning! :D

    I've been using a cone diamond hone for several years with great success......Now it's better!

    The original hone comes with a plastic handle that opens up similarly to a Philippine butterfly knife......and it's rather flimsy. I never realized this slight flexibility was a problem, until after I mounted the diamond cone into a more rigid wooden handle a couple of months ago.

    After I re-mounted the cone, I immediately began to notice the degree of sharpness I could achieve on a gouge was better.....or at the minimum, the resulting edge was more consistently sharp.

    The reason for the increase in efficiency, is due to the flimsy plastic butterfly handle. It flexes ever so slightly with any pressure at all. This means while you're taking off the burr in the flute, it interferes with keeping the cone perfectly flat against the flute.......This is the source of the problem, and it's bad news!

    The cone shaft mounts to the plastic handle with a long set screw. It can be removed with an allen wrench and re-used for the wooden replacement handle. Be sure to drill the hole so it's nice and tight. I believe I went 1/64" undersize from where I'd normally drill for a screw hole.....very tight fit.

    This is one of those "lucky accidents" you get every now and then. All I was trying to do was get a better feeling handle, and I had no idea I was about to make a discovery that made honing a gouge more efficient! :D

    ooc
     

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  11. Richard Jones

    Richard Jones

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    Cool looking handle, Odie.
     
  12. odie

    odie

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    Heh,heh,heh......hey, thanks Richard.......:D

    Looks are not the objective, but nice looking tools are never a bad thing!

    I'm going to assume for the moment that what looks good on the cone diamond hone is the grip tape I used. This is hockey tape, made for wrapping the handles of ice hockey sticks. It's made specifically for extra grip, and is a cloth tape. I think they use it on baseball bats, as well. Anyway, it's available at a sporting goods store......comes in about every color under the sun! I get it at Play It Again Sports.

    In the shop, I've used it for short lathe tools, banjo handle, mallet handle, etc.......but, I first started using the hockey tape about 15 years ago to get an extra solid grip surface on my gym equipment. I guess it was a natural thing to project the usefulness of the hockey tape to other applications!

    :D

    ooc
     

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    Last edited: Apr 27, 2013
  13. odie

    odie

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    Merit Power Lock discs removal tool.......

    For those using the Merit Power Lock discs, you probably have torn the locking plastic backing from the disc by repeatedly removing the disc with your fingers.

    Some of you may be using a screwdriver......and, this is better, but you can't get two sides at the same time that intersect the center from opposing points.

    Here, I've made up a special tool for Merit Power Lock disc removal that is better yet! It was made from an old chisel.

    This tool also doubles as a quick reference to measure the room needed for the grippers on the Oneway Jumbo, and Mega Jumbo jaws......1/2"

    ooc
     

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    Last edited: Apr 26, 2013
  14. odie

    odie

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    Adjustable pin rest post.......

    If you are like me, there are times when you want the added convenience, fulcrum and steadying ability of a pin rest, but don't want to hassle with changing from the current rest, or just want to continue using the rest you are using.

    This removable vertical pin is made up from lamp clamp. It's quick to attach to most rests that have a flat surface......only seconds of time. It's reversible, in that the clamp handle can be on the left, or right to suit the current need.

    The clamp ends were positioned to where I wanted them by heating with a propane torch and bending to fit the purpose. I've added a rubber covering, so that it won't scratch the tool rests. The rubber covering also serves to increase the grip on the rest. Not as solid as a real pin rest, but is quick on and off, and is good to go for the occasional one time use.

    Like many of my specialized tools, and "shop helpers", it stays close by and can be put to use instantly, and without any loss of concentration for what I'm doing at the moment.......:cool2:

    ooc
     

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  15. odie

    odie

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    Power cords hung from ceiling

    Some of you are aware that I work in a machine shop. This is where I got the idea to install power outlets in the ceiling and hang the power cords from there. This has been a fantastic solution to power cords everywhere on the floor. All equipment is plugged in and ready to go anytime I want to use any of them. The only thing on the floor is my 2nd air hose, which needs to extend throughout the shop.

    ooc
     

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  16. Bill Boehme

    Bill Boehme Administrator Staff Member

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    To change the subject slightly, I like your "Lock-Out -- Tag-Out" device that you made for the lathe controller.
     
  17. odie

    odie

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    Thanks, Bill......

    The lock-out has a magnet on the back and is used for both the reverse and power switch. There are a couple of big fender washers attached to the control box for the magnet to attach to. It stays on the reverse switch all the time, until I need to lock out the power. I should have known better, and done this after I converted to variable speed.....but, all it took was one time accidentally hitting the reverse switch at high rpm......never again! :eek:

    I had a lock out for power only on the Woodfast lathe prior to converting to VS. I accidentally turned it on when the spindle was locked!.....so, I made a fix for it. I should have learned my lesson the first time! :eek::eek:

    ooc
     

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    Last edited: Apr 30, 2013
  18. odie

    odie

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    Here are a couple of depth gauges for checking the interior depth of bowls. They are simple to use and simple to make for yourself. These have been in constant use, and I can't do without them. Why buy one, when they are so easy to make? :cool2:

    Simply a board cut out to the preferred length and a hole drilled through. The rod can be made from anything in your scrap bin......an old coat hanger, or a piece of welding rod would work nicely, but I happen to have some stainless end pieces from work that would have been scrap, otherwise. The hole is friction fit to the rod.

    ooc
     

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  19. odie

    odie

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    I've gotten into some trouble with matching smaller bowls to conform to the limitations of holding the interior rim on Mega Jumbo, and Jumbo jaws, for turning the foot. The shape of certain small bowls makes the exterior rim not usable for this purpose, so the interior rim dimensions have to have an exact minimum diameter (or larger) to work.

    In the past, I've been using a simple ruler to find the limits directly on the bowl, but have made a few mistakes in that measurement. This little gauge makes a mistake impossible. If it slips into the interior, it works! Another simple to make, and simple to use solution.......:cool2:

    Made from Baltic Birch plywood, with smaller dimensional 1/4" plywood backing on rear side for long term resistance to abuse.

    (One thing that is an anomaly with these two jaw sets, is the larger jaws will hold a smaller interior rim diameter. I don't know if this is the same with the current Oneway Mega Jumbo, and Jumbo jaws, but this is how it is with my two sets.......:D)

    ooc
     

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    Last edited: Jun 30, 2013
  20. Tom Coghill

    Tom Coghill

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    Another great idea Odie.

    Hey, do you ever misplace any of these jigs in your shop?? I find that all my "timesavers" need to be organized or they end up costing me more time looking for them:mad:!

    my rule of thumb: I don't allow myself any horizontal spaces closer than the area to properly store the tool / jig. ... but still I will find forsner bit caps on the drill press and drill bits on my stool after a weekend of work:eek:.

    Tom
     

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