Useful shop gadgets.....shop, and "evolving shop" photos......

Discussion in 'Tutorials and Tips' started by odie, Jan 26, 2013.

  1. odie

    odie

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    Thanks, Tom......

    I wish I could say I never misplace anything, but it's seldom!

    Thanks to my Dad (RIP), I'm a very organized shop keeper. He was a little over zealous in keeping a everything organized and spic'n'span, but he did teach me the value of having a place for everything, and everything in it's place. It's not that difficult to initially become organized, but it must be followed up by putting things away when you're done, each and every time.......that's the trick!

    In these two pics, you can see that I've hung the "minimum diameter jig" on a nail close by to the lathe. Easy to get at whenever it's used. That's the idea behind putting a little loop of rope on many things.......to hang on a nail, or hook.

    Later, friend.......:)

    ooc
     

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  2. odie

    odie

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    Cut off cotton glove

    Here is a cut off cotton glove that I've been using to make hand contact with the tool rest slide easily, and with less friction. The cotton glove slides along the tool rest very well. When cutting off the fingers, be sure to leave your index finger longer than the others, so it will work with any grip you're using at the moment. It works just as well for overhand, as it does for underhand.

    This may not work well for newbies who are still using the "death grip"! :(

    For those of you who are turning with confidence, and using a light touch for tool control......it works tremendously well. :D

    The glove can be used right, or left handed, depending on the needs of the moment.

    ooc
     

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    Last edited: Jul 4, 2013
  3. odie

    odie

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    While I'm on the subject of making your tool slide effortlessly on the tool rest, this additional thread from January is appropriate to add here. The glove works well, but there are other things that can be done to make your tool slide even better......used in conjunction with each other, these are things that will improve your turning ability.

    Here's the other thread:

    click:

    http://www.aawforum.org/vbforum/showthread.php?t=9932

    (Sorry, this link is no longer any good......lost when the new forum was initiated.)

    ooc
     

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    Last edited: Feb 26, 2017
  4. James Seyfried

    James Seyfried

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    My useful gadget is a jam-chuck with a cord grip tip to finish the bottoms of hollow forms. The length of the spindle is adjusted so the cord grip puts pressure on the bottom of the hollow form. There is a step in the spindle where the cord grip sits.
     

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  5. odie

    odie

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    Thanks James.......nice to see a little creative shop from others! :cool2:


    If anyone isn't using a rubber belt cleaning stick, you ought to give it a try. They work wonders cleaning crud from abrasive belts and discs. They also make abrasives last longer.......a very good thing!

    When the rubber stick gets too short to handle, it's very easy to get every last bit of use out of one, by epoxying a handle on it. This one is an old hall closet curtain rod that broke, and was replaced. Never throw things like this away, cause you never know when it'll come in handy! :D

    A bit of old dowel like this can be used over and over again for this purpose!

    ooc
     

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  6. odie

    odie

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    This probably won't be of any help to very many other turners, but for those of you who would rather use a (very old-school) faceplate and waste block, it might.....:)

    For roughing and any remounts during the seasoning process, I'm using a chuck.......pretty much standard procedure for most turners these days. Except for final finishing of the foot with jumbo jaws, I don't use a chuck after the seasoning process is completed. Because of this, I need some way to mate a roughed bowl to the foot.....squared and true. This allows for proper positioning of the waste block, and is done using the chuck and cutting a surface on the rim to mate to the grippers of the jumbo jaws. After completing that, I can then mount the seasoned bowl to the jumbo jaws and prepare a flat surface on the tenon. It also allows for finding an exact center of the foot, after the waste block is attached........a necessity for use with screw center chucks. This prepared flat surface will run true to the surface previously cut for mounting to the jumbo jaws.

    In order to do this with precision, I need to make a perfect fit of the turned surface to the grippers of the jumbo jaws. It would be a hassle to try and see how that surface mates to the grippers by using the jumbo jaws themselves, or to hold the gripper by itself in my hand.

    I have mounted one gripper to a board, which allows me to check this mating of surfaces quickly and easily. You'll see a "half moon" cut-out near the gripper......this makes for a better visual check.

    ooc
     

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    Last edited: Jul 12, 2013
  7. odie

    odie

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    Here are three pieces of white-backed shelving that I use to view the profile shape of mounted bowls. This comes in handy to clearly see imperfections in the shape. I use these on nearly every bowl I make, because it's important to get a good look at the profile, and deal with imperfections in the shape while it's still easy to correct. There probably isn't any turner who hasn't wished he could go back and do a correction to a shape, when it's too late! :mad:

    There are two simple pieces that are placed on the bedways, or banjo to view the profile from above......very simple to make and use. The only disadvantage to this, is they are quick to be covered by chips while turning, but very useful for a short period of time, or just a quick look at the profile.

    The third one is for viewing the profile from the horizontal perspective. It's a bit more involved to make, but convenient to use while actually turning, because it's position won't allow chips to obscure the view quickly. It's simply installed by a wedge piece of wood that fits between the bedways. (No tools required to install.)

    All three are easy to install, and use......and, the benefits of seeing the profile clearly is well worth their regular use. :D

    ooc

    Photos, L to R:
    A) All three
    B) Horizontal view
    C) Large piece on bedway
    D) Small piece on top of banjo
     

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    Last edited: Aug 24, 2013
  8. Bart Leetch

    Bart Leetch

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    For the one on the wall glue a piece of white laminate on the wall it's easy to keep clean & will brighten up the room. Or again get out the roller & brush & paint that whole shop white.
     
  9. odie

    odie

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    Permanent surfaces won't work for long........that is, if you turn wet woods.

    I did see a suggestion from someone else that also sounds pretty good. He used an old fashioned white roll-up window blind, which was removed after use. I might have tried that myself if I hadn't already had this jig that works fine.

    ooc
     
  10. odie

    odie

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    Getting new life out of your old scratchy face shield......

    I believe this face shield I've been using is about 15 years old, or so. When I first bought it, I also purchased two new replacements for the plastic lens .......but, I have yet to use one of the replacements! I've been polishing up the same old original lens for years!

    The two-step scratch remover and polishing compounds are called Novus 1, and Novus 2. Although I got the Novus compounds at a Harley Davidson dealer for use on plastic motorcycle windshields, these same compounds are available at a hardware store.

    I've made up a little "kit" for doing the job.

    There is a large pad of close knit rug material used as a backer under the face shield while the scratches are being removed. Also I've converted an old 3" sanding disc backer with a round piece of the same close knit rug material. This, when installed on your drill motor, is used against a piece of folded soft cotton t-shirt material for application of the Novus compounds.

    The whole job takes less than ten minutes, and you're good to go for another six months, or so. :D

    ooc
     

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    Last edited: Aug 31, 2013
  11. Jeff Gilfor

    Jeff Gilfor

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    Thanks Odie!
     
  12. odie

    odie

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    My pleasure, Jeff........:D

    ooc
     
  13. Bart Leetch

    Bart Leetch

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    Odie

    The LOML made a bag out of an old bath towel for my shield I just blow the shield off run it under the faucet & dry it & slip it in the bag to keep it from getting scratched when not in use.
     
  14. odie

    odie

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    Sounds good, Bart......

    Do you put your face shield in the bag every time you take it off and put it on, while working in the shop? How about when you rough wet bowl stock? That mess usually doesn't simply wipe off cleanly.

    I usually hang my FS on the lathe tail stock, and it's on and off about a dozen times in a shop session. That, it seems is where the majority of the abuse and scratching happens. It probably wouldn't be a bad idea to cover it up when I'm not in the shop.......:D

    ooc
     
  15. Bart Leetch

    Bart Leetch

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    I hung the FS up high & back away where it would be safe & I've only turned dry wood so far.
     
  16. Sergio Villa

    Sergio Villa

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    And the wood chips, where are they don't they accumulate in the tray?
     
  17. Bill Boehme

    Bill Boehme Administrator Staff Member

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    Wood chips mostly go the other way. Sanding dust is another matter, however, the shop vac has to be used to pick up stuff all around the lathe so the tray doesn't present itself as a special problem. In my case, instead of the shop vac, it's the air hose since my "studio" is the great outdoors.
     
  18. odie

    odie

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    FYI.......for a quick link to the photos being discussed:

    If you click on that little blue box next to Angelo's name, it will bring you directly to the Angelo's original post, which includes the photos of his shop.

    :cool2:

    ooc
     
  19. Bart Leetch

    Bart Leetch

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    So Odie you now have no excuse do it now paint that mole hole shop white keep on until you get it right. I meant bright no more shadows lots a light fight fight fight until you get it right.
     
  20. Sergio Villa

    Sergio Villa

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    Also when one cores a bowl?
     

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