Useful shop gadgets.....shop, and "evolving shop" photos......

Discussion in 'Tutorials and Tips' started by odie, Jan 26, 2013.

  1. odie

    odie

    Joined:
    Dec 22, 2006
    Messages:
    4,420
    Location:
    Deep in the woods
    Forget it, Bart.......:D

    As I said before, if I could go back and paint the walls white, while the shop was under construction, I would do that. For now, I'm not willing to tear down the entire shop to have some limited lighting benefit. The current combination of fluorescent, incandescent and spot lighting is very good without the walls being white, and I don't consider it a limitation that justifies the effort required to paint the walls.....

    Your post seems a bit unusual.......celebrating the Labor Day weekend, are we?

    ooc
     
    Last edited: Sep 1, 2013
  2. Bart Leetch

    Bart Leetch

    Joined:
    Mar 20, 2009
    Messages:
    207
    Never drank much haven't had a drop in 27 years.
     
  3. odie

    odie

    Joined:
    Dec 22, 2006
    Messages:
    4,420
    Location:
    Deep in the woods
    Trying to steer the thread back in the right direction.........:D

    Here is a two-position angle sander cradle I made up. For quite a long time, I used a simple plywood board, but the sanders were not stable enough to be problem free in the original configuration. It was too easy to accidently bump the sanders and knock them off. Since making the "cradles", I couldn't be happier with this set-up.:D

    ooc

    The first two pics are of the lathe table with sander cradles as they are now.
    The 3rd pic is of the table as it was a few years ago. The last pic shows how the table is positioned between the bedways......quick on and off.
     

    Attached Files:

    Last edited: Sep 1, 2013
  4. Bart Leetch

    Bart Leetch

    Joined:
    Mar 20, 2009
    Messages:
    207
    Looks like a great way to control the sanders.

    On to another problem. I tried using a sander like those at a turners get together BBQ etc. I found them to big in the body to handle comfortably so I purchased a Craftsman angle drill that has a long body with thee motor on the tail end. I also want to try one of the sanders that are driven by the lathe turning.

    http://www.woodcraft.com/Product/2004859/7706/WoodRiver-2-Bowl-Sander.aspx
     
  5. Steve Worcester

    Steve Worcester Admin Emeritus

    Joined:
    Apr 9, 2004
    Messages:
    2,629
    Location:
    Plano, Texas
    Home Page:
    The problem with inertia sanders is that the require..... Inertia. At the outside of the bowls, angling the sander and it works fine. On the inside the surface feet per minute speed is slower and the sanding is really slow. The solution is to speed up the piece and have at it, but then the outer rims you want to transition into are going too fast.
    Even if you go to a Harbor Freight electric angle drill it would be more useful and controllable IMHO
     
    Last edited: Sep 3, 2013
  6. odie

    odie

    Joined:
    Dec 22, 2006
    Messages:
    4,420
    Location:
    Deep in the woods
    Bart.......

    I have an inertia sander like you linked to. My experience was unsatisfactory, as was with Steve's findings. You should probably get one since they're fairly cheap. Use it for awhile and come to your own conclusions about it.

    As for the Sioux and Milwaukee angle drills, you should get one of those too.....that is, if you ever plan on making bowls with inward facing walls. A regular drill works fine with gradual outward facing walls, but the angle drill works for everything. A get-together at a BBQ just isn't enough experience with these to make the judgment call on the usefulness of this kind of drill for sanding bowls. Use it two-handed braced against a solid block of wood.......you'll be amazed at how well this kind of angle drill works for sanding on the lathe.....:D

    Here are some examples of bowls that you just can't sand with a conventional drill. This is what I mean when I say "inward" turned walls.....

    ooc
     

    Attached Files:

    Last edited: Sep 7, 2013
  7. Bill Boehme

    Bill Boehme Administrator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Jan 27, 2005
    Messages:
    8,125
    Location:
    Dalworthington Gardens, TX
    Home Page:
    The shavings come out of the slot directly above the cutter and then drop straight down. However, when you get more than a couple inches into the slot, the shavings tend to stay in the kerf until the cutter is pulled back. So basically, the shavings are well behaved -- all going into a neat little pile directly beneath the cutter.
     
  8. Sergio Villa

    Sergio Villa

    Joined:
    Apr 13, 2013
    Messages:
    269
    Location:
    Ct
    Thank you for your answer, but my shavings do better: they fall directly in the big yellow scoop that Odie has shown and I just bought.
     
  9. Bart Leetch

    Bart Leetch

    Joined:
    Mar 20, 2009
    Messages:
    207
    Originally Posted by Bart Leetch View Post
    Looks like a great way to control the sanders.

    Odie
    Don't know whether you caught it or not.

    On to another problem. I tried using a sander like those at a turners get together BBQ etc. I found them to big in the body to handle comfortably so I purchased a Craftsman angle drill that has a long body with thee motor on the tail end. I also want to try one of the sanders that are driven by the lathe turning.
     
  10. odie

    odie

    Joined:
    Dec 22, 2006
    Messages:
    4,420
    Location:
    Deep in the woods
    Hi Bart.......

    Are you yelling........again? Heh,heh,heh........:D

    Yep, you are right......I missed the point that you had purchased an angle drill. This is what works. Did you get a ninety degree angle drill? Forty-five degrees are better for inward slanting walls, because it gets out of the way much easier.......but you can update us when you have made a few bowls like the ones I've shown above........

    ooc
     
  11. odie

    odie

    Joined:
    Dec 22, 2006
    Messages:
    4,420
    Location:
    Deep in the woods
    Sometimes second effort is essential to progress.......

    In the case of face protection, this is the case.

    Originally, I modified a hockey helmet for those bowls where I felt there was substantial risk of it coming apart on the lathe. That was pretty good, but I decided to try again.

    The second effort was made from a women's softball league fielder's mask. After having used it on several occasions, the fielder's mask is now my "go to" face protection. After brazing some additional steel protection, I'm very satisfied with this form of occasional protection, and the modifications.

    One distinct advantage to the fielder's mask, is it will fit comfortably underneath my normal face shield.

    Note: The photo showing the fielder's mask under the face shield was taken prior to the modifications.

    ooc
     

    Attached Files:

  12. odie

    odie

    Joined:
    Dec 22, 2006
    Messages:
    4,420
    Location:
    Deep in the woods
    I've always had trouble bringing wood chips into the house, and a portion of those have been brought in via the tops and lacing of my shoes and socks. When I saw "the shoe bib" being offered by Woodcraft, I added a pair of them to my next order.

    http://www.woodcraft.com/Product/2082427/31460/Woodcraft-The-Shoe-Bib-Desert-Camo.aspx

    What a waste of money that was! Those shoe bibs suffer from a bad design, and the skirts stick out far enough to be a tripping hazard. You could step on the skirt of the opposite shoe. Not only that, but they are not that easy to strap on, because you have to reach around to the backside, or heel of your shoe with both hands to secure the Velcro tabs.

    Anyway, the idea was real good, and they did solve a problem that landed me in the doghouse a number of times. The idea occurred to cut off the pant legs of an old pair of sweatpants. These are installed upside down on your lower legs and cover your shoes and socks. They are pretty easy to put on and off, but it does require the shoes to be removed to make the installation.......for me, no problem.

    The shoe bibs are what gave me the inspiration for the cut-off sweat pant idea......too bad I had to waste my money to arrive at that idea! The sweat pant legs work like a charm! :cool2:

    My shoes, being the vehicle to transport wood chips into the house, is now solved for good!

    Now, I need a solution to the chips that I carry into the house in my hair! Some of those end up in the bed! :eek:

    The first photo is of my shoe bibs from Woodcraft, and the second photo is the final solution to an age-old problem! :D

    ooc
     

    Attached Files:

    Last edited: Oct 6, 2013
  13. Bart Leetch

    Bart Leetch

    Joined:
    Mar 20, 2009
    Messages:
    207
    You say you have shavings in your hair ...that is a bit of a sticky wicket isn't it. Solution vacuum or air blow your hair with your eyes closed...jump in the shower & wash it. Ta Da no shavings in the bed. Or you could just sleep with the dog in the dog house. You'd stay warm & the dog wouldn't care about the shavings. Ha Ha...

    On 3rd thought maybe a surgical cap. Hello Dr. Odie

    I can hear it now Dr. Odie to the lathe STAT.....for an operation you don't want to miss. You say at 1700 RPM you removed his WHAT ?????

    I can just see Dr. Odie in surgical garb with a stethoscope around his neck & the neighbors neck hanging out & the questions....& the answer from Dr. Odie don't worry it a new type of operation.

    Operation Mr. Clean.
     
    Last edited: Oct 7, 2013
  14. odie

    odie

    Joined:
    Dec 22, 2006
    Messages:
    4,420
    Location:
    Deep in the woods
    Heh,heh,heh......ok, you made me lol, Bart.......:D

    You know, I have been using a blast of air on my hair......but, it's not a fool proof strategy. Those with short hair don't have as much trouble as I do.......but, at this stage of my life, I'm thankful to still have hair at all! :)

    With that long beard of yours, you probably have to jump through some hoops to keep the peace, as well! :D

    Later.......

    ooc
     
  15. AlanZ

    AlanZ

    Joined:
    Mar 15, 2009
    Messages:
    445
    Location:
    Oradell, NJ
    Odie,

    Have patience... if you wait long enough, hair might be gone...
     
  16. Bart Leetch

    Bart Leetch

    Joined:
    Mar 20, 2009
    Messages:
    207
    Heh,heh,heh......ok, you made me lol, Bart.......:D

    You know, I have been using a blast of air on my hair......but, it's not a fool proof strategy. Those with short hair don't have as much trouble as I do.......but, at this stage of my life, I'm thankful to still have hair at all! :)

    With that long beard of yours, you probably have to jump through some hoops to keep the peace, as well! :D

    Later.......


    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rGa9IvpooKI
     
  17. Bart Leetch

    Bart Leetch

    Joined:
    Mar 20, 2009
    Messages:
    207
    Odie

    I don't seem to have much problem with my beard when I turn. Of course if I don't turn to fast I don't get dizzy & fall down either.

    Something I found out by trial was I can wear a 3M filter mask over my beard for turning & sanding & I get along fine it filters well & the allergies don't act up & my sinuses don't close up. Kinda funny lookin with the 3M & work-tunes head set & a face shield on. I walked into the house with all this on thinking my dachshunds would go nuts they just wagged their tails with a look like we know its you what are you trying to pull this time.

    Did I ever mention the LOML made a sack type cover for my face shield out of an old bath towel stitched up in the shape of a pillow case. When finished turning I blow the shield off then run it under the faucet carefully dry it & put it in the sack & it's protected.
     
  18. odie

    odie

    Joined:
    Dec 22, 2006
    Messages:
    4,420
    Location:
    Deep in the woods
    Bart.......

    Although I'm clean shaven, and the last time I had a beard was around 30, or so years ago......your idea of wearing the 3M filter mask over your beard sounds like an idea of some interest to other turners.

    Yes, I believe you did mention the sack you keep your face shield at some time in the past......also sounds like a good idea.

    I invite you to take some pics of these things and post here......I'm sure there are other turners who would be interested in seeing them.......:D

    ooc



    Heh,heh,heh........Alan, that's exactly what I'm afraid of. There is this little bald spot in the back of my head that's been growing for the past few years! Oh well, I guess this is the price I must pay for maturity!........:rolleyes:

    ooc
     
    Last edited: Oct 7, 2013
  19. odie

    odie

    Joined:
    Dec 22, 2006
    Messages:
    4,420
    Location:
    Deep in the woods
    I purchased one of these Gel Pro anti-fatigue work mats a couple months ago, and I'm truly amazed on how great it is! This mat is very cushiony, and a great addition to my shop. I regularly stand for hours at my place of employment, and come home to stand for more hours at home in my shop. Sometimes on week-ends, I'll spend time standing for 12+ hours at a time.......and, my old feet needed something, other than the cheap mat and insole inserts I had been using.

    I hesitated and contemplated a lot before spending the money on this mat......they are very expensive. After using it for a couple months, I'm completely sold on how valuable it will be in the coming years! (Sort of how I complained about the Tompkins Gage T being expensive, but forgot all about the money, once I put it to use! :D)

    There is a video available here:
    http://www.woodturnerscatalog.com/p...co-Pro-Anti-Fatigue-Work-Mat?term=fatigue+mat

    ooc
     

    Attached Files:

    Last edited: Oct 12, 2013
  20. Gerald Lawrence

    Gerald Lawrence

    Joined:
    Feb 6, 2010
    Messages:
    719
    Location:
    Brandon, MS
    Try Boots

    I solved this years ago. I always wear boots in the shop and yard. You can take them off easill with a kick at the door. Wearing Justin work boots last 5 years.
     

Share This Page