Useful shop gadgets.....shop, and "evolving shop" photos......

Discussion in 'Tutorials and Tips' started by odie, Jan 26, 2013.

  1. John Teichert

    John Teichert

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    I'm for it

    Odie, I learned the value of gel cushions when I did a lot of bicycle riding, and invested in gloves and a seat cushion with gel. Easier on the hands, and my arse was equally sore, instead of direly sore in three spots:).

    That shop in the video was way to clean, I thought the idea was to stand on 3 inches of shavings.
     
  2. odie

    odie

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    I know what you're saying, John.......

    I'm a bicycle rider myself, during good weather and seasons. Never tried gel on the seat, but do have gel gloves.....they are a good thing to have.

    This Gel Pro mat is very thick....about 3/4". I'm really surprised just how well it works......wish I had gotten one of these years ago!

    ooc
     
  3. odie

    odie

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    This little piece of rubber mat with attached magnets to the back has turned out to be one of the handiest aids! Magnets are simply attached with hot glue.

    I use this as a cushion for bracing my body for a more precise, or controlled cut. Much of the time, body movement is from the entire body, but there are times when I want to brace a knee, hip, thigh or elbow for a particular cut, and the bit of cushion for my body parts is a great convenience.

    So simple, yet so useful! :cool2:

    ooc
     

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    Last edited: Oct 17, 2013
  4. James Seyfried

    James Seyfried

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    I saw this at the Ohio Valley Woodturners Association Symposium, it is called a rubber chucky. This one is the mini reverse chucky; I also bought a 6" extension. It is a big improvement over the wooden ones I was making for each HF.

    I have also "upgraded' the shop with a couple of clear shower curtains. Both are hung on cables, one in front of the lathe (slightly visible in the background) and one behind. They both help with the wood chip mess.
     

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  5. Matt Lewis

    Matt Lewis

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    A Gadget for Every Lathe

    I like to keep my hands free when turning off the lathe. I thought others might find this useful - switch.

    Best regards,
     
  6. odie

    odie

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    James.......How are you securing the bottom of the HF? Are you using something chucked into the tailstock?

    Matt......Very creative thinking, and looks like a great job of making it happen! That also looks like it could be very useful as an emergency stop.

    Thanks to you both for showing us something inspirational! :cool2:

    ooc
     
  7. James Seyfried

    James Seyfried

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    I usually use a Sorby revolving center with the tailstock to remove the tenon from the bottom of the HF. I have used the stock one but the Sorby set gives me more options and I think more room for cleaning up the bottom. It also has a flat tip that I have used to hold the piece for sanding. However, I want to come up with a rubber tip for that purpose. I think Rubberchucky has tips fro the tailstock too, probably should have got one.
     
  8. hockenbery

    hockenbery AAW Advisor Staff Member

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    I have two solutions you might try. I glued a piece of leather on the tip of a flat metal live center insert. It does not mar the wood. With the rough side of the leather it holds better than the metal too.

    A second solution is I have wooden covers for the live center with leather glued on the tips. A 1 1/2 inch hole fits over the mini lathe centers if it is loose a wrap with masking tape makes a tight fit. I then turn the outside to a flat point 1/2 diameter ( make a slight recess in the tip) and glue on a piece of leather with thick CA. I use this when I do ball demos and I have set for use in workshops. I have a bunch to fit the ONEWAY center too. 5/8" hole?? And 3 wraps of masking tape.

    I also have a bunch of rubber chunky cones and other shapes that screw onto the ONEWAY live centers.
    Don Doyle the rubber chucky innovator was a long time member of our woodturning club and he has a great product.
    The material Don uses in the casting can be turned to suit for special applications.

    Al
     
    Last edited: Oct 29, 2013
  9. odie

    odie

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    Oneway Jumbo Jaws hole selection jig.........

    This summer, I made up a little jig that is working out very well for me, and am now sharing this idea with the rest of you. Some may not have a need, or be able to apply it to their own shop procedures, and a few of you will find it very helpful and beneficial.

    For the past twenty years, I've been using a chart that gives the usable sizes for hole selection for placing the rubber grippers on the Jumbo jaws. There is nothing wrong with using the chart. It works fine, but the new jig works a little faster, and less confusing when it comes to critical choices between two rubber gripper positions. This is especially true if you are processing bowls in batches through this stage of completion.

    You can see there are overlapping areas of application for the rubber gripper placement. One thing I've always done is use the largest hole on the Jumbo Jaw plates that will apply when two choices are available. This is a safety concern, because the chuck jaws are in the most compact position. This safety aspect applies to either expand, or contract mode......use the largest hole that works.

    The left side of the jig is aligned to either the outside edge, or inside edge of the left side of the bowl, and the reading is taken on the right corresponding edge of the bowl as indicated on the jig......simple to use, and simple to get it right every time. :D

    ooc
     

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  10. Breck Whitworth

    Breck Whitworth

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    love the depth adjustment

    Odie thanks for posting your drill adjustment technique. I plan on doing something like that for my depth adjustment, it sure beats a piece of tape.
     
  11. odie

    odie

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    You are certainly welcome, Breck.......

    ......and, thanks to Mike Peace for the advice of using a shorter drill bit in his post #21. After using the shorter 3/8" drill bit for a time, it's a much better alternative than the long 3/16" bit I has been using as the second depth drill.

    For deeper bowls, the long 3/8" bit is still the "go to" depth drill.

    It's great when I can help out another turner on these forums......but, it's fantastic, when ideas from other turners can turn me on to something that improves my own turning efforts! :D:D

    For a one time use, I still use the old tape method you are using.....just not on the depth drill. It works, and is quick and easy for those other times a particular depth of drilling is needed.

    ooc
     

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    Last edited: Nov 6, 2013
  12. Breck Whitworth

    Breck Whitworth

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    Made me a depth stop today

    Hi Odie,
    Just wanted to let you know I made one today and used it already when roughing a nice wet deep sycamore bowl. Thanks, I love a good jig and have a few but it seems the simple ones are the best sometimes. I am always looking to get better and learn how to do something easier if I can.
     
  13. odie

    odie

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    Excellent, Breck........:cool2:

    I see you don't need them durned "round tuits" for motivation......good on you!:D

    ooc
     
  14. robo hippy

    robo hippy

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    One thing I have added to my arsenal is a wire wheel on one of my grinders. Great for removing gunk from my tools. I have been turning a lot of madrone, and it sprays out a lot of really sticky stuff. Maybe not sap, but it gunks up everything. It won't wipe off if it sits for more than about 5 minutes, so the wire wheel takes it off really quickly.

    robo hippy
     
  15. Breck Whitworth

    Breck Whitworth

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    I have often wondered if anyone else uses a wire wheel like I do. I also found it to be a good way for removing "the gunk" when it gets hardened on my tools. It really is a quick and effective method of cleaning them right before sharpening.
     
  16. odie

    odie

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    A motor driven wire wheel will do the job quickly, but I've evolved to using brass and steel wire brushes that are about the size of your toothbrush. The reason I've switched, is because I've been worried that the wire wheel might be a bit too aggressive. If the surface profile of the gouge acquires any imperfections, it will directly effect the quality of the edge that tool is capable of. There are a few times when the wire brass brush doesn't get some thick hardened debris in the flute. If not, I proceed to the steel wire toothbrush. If both of those fail to do the job, then I've made up a special tool with a curved edge out of an old screwdriver that quickly pops off any stubborn debris pronto.

    :D This might be one of those times where I worry too much!......but, if I were to go back to a motor driven wire wheel, I'd definitely look for one with brass bristles.

    ooc
     
  17. Brian McInturff

    Brian McInturff

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    Odie,
    Try a brass wire wheel. I forget where I bought mine but it works great. For the stubborn gunk that eon't come off use a few drops of wd40 and then the brass wire wheel.
     
  18. Breck Whitworth

    Breck Whitworth

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    Heat in the deep south problem solved

    I live in Gulfport MS and the heat in my large uninsulated wood shop makes it miserable to attempt turning in all but about two months a year. I would sweat all over the lathe and my tools. I couldn't afford to insulate and cool a 30 x 40 shop. My solution was a cold room inside my shop. I built an 8 x 12 framed room with a 36" door. I built it around my 3520B lathe then put building wrap on the inside walls to handle the wet spray and curlies. I put 3/4" tounge & groove foam insulation board R-4 around the outside of the 2x4frame. I framed in a hole for a small a/c window unit I had and I now have a wonderful cold room for turning. I have been turning in it for quite a while and it works exceptionally well. If you had a floor unit with dual heating option it would work for cold areas also. I vent with my dust collector through a hole in one wall. I have an air cleaning unit I am building to put in the ceiling for dust. When turning I always use my trend air-pro face shield. Just thought this might be a help to others who were in the same spot I was in. I hope this idea helps others like it did me when a friend suggested it.
     

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  19. robo hippy

    robo hippy

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    Steel wire wheels won't take off any steel, though they will remove paint and gunk in general, and will take off a burr. I have had wires come off and do stand out of the line of fire, and keep glasses on. The only difficulty with the wire wheel is some times if you roll an edge of some thing into it the wrong way, it is rather grabby. Interesting note, I was playing with a rag trying to get the wire wheel to grab it, and it wouldn't.

    robo hippy
     
  20. James Seyfried

    James Seyfried

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    Reach sanding ball improvement

    I recently bought a Reach sanding ball to sand the interior of vases and hollow forms. It worked pretty good with the Abranet sanding disks. Then while sanding a deep vase the disk fell off. While looking at the velcro it occurred to me that I could add velcro strips to hold the Abernet better. Not only does it hold it better it gives more sanding surface and is easily replaceable. It's a nice tool, but if this one wears out I will save my money and make one. In fact I think it might be be nice to make some with different size heads for different interior shapes.

    As the vase was deeper than the handle was long, I found that it would fit in the handle I have for hollowing equipment. I also used a hollowing bar to hold a 2" sanding disk.

    The vase is 15" deep and I would say the limit for my abilities with a Monster Hollowing system.
     

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