Useful shop gadgets.....shop, and "evolving shop" photos......

Discussion in 'Tutorials and Tips' started by odie, Jan 26, 2013.

  1. Jerry Bailey

    Jerry Bailey

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    OK, I got nosy, and had to have a poke around your shop too :rolleyes:
    really like the idea of making the listing with the opening/closing jaw measurements
    great idea, and dunno why I hadn't thought of that yet ;-)

    James, they sell a version of Abranet pads that are hook & loop already, just bought some for my palm sander
    was either thu Woodcraft or Craft USA, don't remember which and not sure if they have them in the 2" sizes though .........
    are you happy with the Reach sanding ball? a worthwhile investment?

    nice shop set-up odie :)
     
  2. odie

    odie

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    .

    RE: post #129 on page 13

    Yep, That chart and two jigs are really handy.....and, are in constant use.
    Easy to make, easy to use, and saves a lot of measuring.

    Thanks, Jerry

    ooc

    .
     
  3. James Seyfried

    James Seyfried

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    All the Abranet that I have is hook & loop already too…perhaps I worded my post poorly. What I did was add more velcro to hold larger disks better. The Reach sanding ball is nice, however I had originally thought it would go in my angle drill for power sanding. It is too large for the chuck and would probably be too hard to control at that length. It was a worthwhile investment when I was working 12 hrs 7 days a week, now that I'm retired I would make one and save some money.
     
  4. Jerry Bailey

    Jerry Bailey

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    Thanks James, wasn't sure if there was a specific advantage over buying, than making one
    now I know to make my own and save the money :)
     
  5. barbsiddiqui

    barbsiddiqui

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    A heat box for finishes

    Odie, this is a great thread,with lots of useful information. Thanks for starting it.

    The most useful thing I've made in my shop has been a heated, insulated box to keep finishes and adhesives at a decent temperature during the winter months. I built it tall and thin to fit a space open behind my lathe, and my SO George wired a light bulb base on the bottom to a thermostat on top so I can adjust the temperature. Even with this winter's deep cold, going for weeks at single-digit temps, it has kept the contents at or above 45ºF consistently. For the insulation, I bought cheap foam board at Walmart and tacked it in to fit between the shelves and on the inside of the door and back. Rare earth magnets hold the door closed, though I also attached a hook and eye closure later. It is one of those 'I should have done this years ago' items, and I wouldn't want to be without it.

    FinishBxClose copy.jpg FinishBxLoaded copy.jpg FinishBxOpLight copy.jpg
     
  6. Pete Blair

    Pete Blair

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    Useful?

    I read through all 15 pages to try to be certain that I wash't stepping on anyones toes.
    Not sure where I saw this but I now believe it is one of the best time savers I have in my shop.
    I used to have a lot of trouble getting to the bottom of a hollow form and getting rid of that little 'nib' that I often left until I came across this solution.
    I used to use forester bits but depending on the wood they are slow and they often plug up like this. Needing frequent removal to clear.
    IMG_2751.jpg
    Now I start with a forester, and then choose the same size modified speed bit like this.
    Cuts easy once started and leaves a nice rounded bottom.
    IMG_2752.jpg
    It seems that as long as I drill far enough to catch the sides of the spade bit it stays nice and straight.

    Odie, with all the helpful hints you could probably write a book!!!

    Thanks for all this.

    Ps. I wonder just how much time you have to turn AFTER all the time you must spend on making jigs and other helpful items?
     
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  7. Jerry Bailey

    Jerry Bailey

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    Pete, pretty cool modification of the speed bore bits, and makes it tons easier to sharpen manually
    like the idea, wondered how steady/stable they'd be, but I'd think if you kept the profile shaped nicely then there'd be no issues.
    Have a couple wasted speed bores that I'll try this on!
    Thanks for the tip & the pic! ;)
     
  8. hockenbery

    hockenbery AAW Advisor Staff Member

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    Twist drill with morse taper

    Pete,

    Good idea. I don't like the holes made by the point of a Forstner or a spade bit.
    Your rounding solves that.

    I use a 1" twist drill with a morse taper. Doesn't need a chuck and it drills pretty straight from start to finish.

    I bought my but from wholesale tools for about $12 in 2004.
    It is easy to sharpen on a grinding wheel.

    Another way to get the same results. Your hole may be a little more rounded.
    Thanks for sharing
    Al
     
  9. Pete Blair

    Pete Blair

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    Wolverine

    I have one more tip that has saved me much time and effort.
    I have the Wolverine sharpening system as I'm certain a lot of you do as well.
    One one side I have a Robo Rest which I find is super. I keep a chart of angles I use for various tools on a board hanging under the sharpener so I can refer to it really quickly.
    When I sharpen bowl gouges and detail spindle gouges I use the other wheel but I was constantly making minor adjustments to get it just right. I use a differnt settings for each type of gouge and have now drilled a 1/8 hole through the sliding arm so I can instantly get exact repeatable results. Oh, this tip will only work if one uses A CBN wheel.
    I used to use a felt marker on the cutting edge of the gouge to get the set-up just right but now all I have to do is install a pin through the hole I drilled.
    I could include a photo if anyone is interested.
     
  10. john lucas

    john lucas

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    My sharpening setting jigs will work with any wheel and even works when the wheel changes size, (which won't happen with the CBN of course) Here's a video showing them.
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Xbggxj2kgyc
     
  11. Jerry Bailey

    Jerry Bailey

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    John, very cool idea, and thanks for taking the time to create the video
    I like how you created the extra block so you never have to change the degree angle of the jig
    That's been my biggest issue, getting the arm in the correct position depending on what you're sharpening......
    Now have the raptor CBN,which has made an awesome difference in grind/edge,
    will spend the afternoon creating my own jigs, will make life much easier in future :)
     
  12. odie

    odie

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    Thank you for showing us your heat box, Barb......that is a really terrific idea, and I'm going to follow your cue and do something like this......great! :D

    Yes, this thread has been great......there have been several entries that made me change my evil ways! Ha! Just kidding, but I really do appreciate the input of others here, especially when they encourage me to make things just a little bit better in my own shop! :cool:

    ooc
     
  13. odie

    odie

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    Pete.......thanks!

    I also really do appreciate the input of others on this thread......:cool:

    Don't think I could write a book......I'm too busy doing everything else!

    I hoped this thread would inspire some really useful things that myself, and other turners could use......it looks like it's a success! :D

    Thanks for this really great tip you are including here.......

    ooc
     
  14. odie

    odie

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    Just a little tip here for those turners that frequently rough bowls with a high moisture content. I keep a peanut container near my tool rests that has an oil soaked rag......plain old motor oil. when I'm finished with a wet roughed bowl, I normally take a dry rag and wipe down the lathe and tool rest. After that, I take the oil soaked rag and give the bedways, lathe components, and tool rests a rub with the oil soaked rag. This has effectively kept rust from forming for the past twenty+ years. It's quick and easy to do......:D

    ooc
     

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  15. Gerald Lawrence

    Gerald Lawrence

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    I use WD-40 removes moisture and cleans
     
  16. odie

    odie

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    Whatever works is fine, Gerald......as long as it's not neglected! ;)

    ooc
     
  17. odie

    odie

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    Don't you just hate it when you progress through the grits, or even after the final finish is applied.......and a little scratch mark shows up to ruin what you thought was a perfect finish? I just don't see as well as I used to, and I've also been using trifocals for the past decade, or so. Out of necessity, I can no longer rely on a blast of air to check the fine details of my surface between grits, and final before applying a finish. Using a woodworkers tack cloth after the blast of air will really make a difference in seeing the imperfections. I'm also using a magnifying glass to see better, as well.

    (The magnifying glass was salvaged from a magnifying lamp that was being tossed out where I work......real glass, and not one of those "scratch magnet" plastic lenses most magnifying glasses have these days. :mad:)

    ooc
     

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  18. Mark Hepburn

    Mark Hepburn

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    Odie,

    This is a great thread.

    I'm a trifocal user too and I'm going to borrow your idea of the magnifying glass for one of these days when my mistakes are too small to be seen with normal vision. For now though, I can see them from across the shop :)

    Seriously though, I do like that magnifier idea. And I've used tack cloth forever on my flatwork and it's really helpful. Note to self though, based on some work yesterday, on bocote ya gotta wipe downhill. that's downhill.....
     
  19. Jeff Gilfor

    Jeff Gilfor

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    Tired of sawdust and chips in your socks and shoes? You can purchase some "shoe bibs" online from one of the big tool houses, or...
    Go to Target, purchase infant bibs (come in sets of 2 for about $5), add a bit of velcro so that it can be snugged up well, and there you go.

    photo (23)-r25.jpg

    It's important to chose a non-embarrassing print though.
     
  20. odie

    odie

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    Great idea, Jeff........

    Yes, I am one who is plagued by chips in shoes and socks, too. I have a couple of alternate methods, but I'll remember this baby bib idea. Looks like it will do the job. Thank you.

    ooc
     

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