Wet grinder woes

Discussion in 'Woodturning Discussion Forum' started by Gary Beasley, Nov 7, 2017.

  1. Gary Beasley

    Gary Beasley

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    Anybody ever had your wet grinder stone to spontaneously develop a crack? I noticed one on mine the other day going straight from the shaft to the perimeter. It hasn't affected its sharpening ability but I'm concerned at some point the crack will finish its trip across the wheel, forceing me to replace it before I've gotten my dollars worth out of it. Since CBN wheels are now available for wet systems I'll probably go that route.
    It just a bit annoying as nothing has happened to it I know of to cause any damage other than old age.
     
  2. Bill Boehme

    Bill Boehme Administrator Staff Member

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    Which system do you have? It certainly sounds like it is related to over tightening the retaining nut.

    When I originally bought my Tormek in the late 90's, the procedure for tightening the wheel nut was to give the end of the wrench a couple quick raps with a hammer. While that sounds like a lot of torque, it actually was more precise than using the Armstrong method and potentially overtightening. Since then, I upgraded the machine to use the EzyLock system which only requires finger tightening of the nut. Normal start up torque from the motor and wheel inertia takes care of the rest. I've gone through two wheels and haven't had a problem with cracking.

    Another possible cause could be expansion pressure due to corrosion of the axle. On the last stone I replaced just recently, the stone and axle were rusted together, but the stone wasn't cracked ... possibly because the stone had a nylon bushing that might have compressed enough to absorb some of the pressure. Here's what the axle looked like after I cleaned off the heavy rusting. I discovered that some stainless steel alloys apparently can rust. This is probably 18-8. I think that 316 would have been a better choice.

    image.jpeg
     
    Last edited: Nov 7, 2017
  3. Gary Beasley

    Gary Beasley

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    It looks to me like the rust could be the culprit. I've had the unit for quite a few years and never took the stone off so it could be rusted in. I plan on running it until the wheel falls off, have to take bets on how long that will be.
     
  4. John Torchick

    John Torchick

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    Just don't be in front of the wheel when it lets go.
     
  5. musky

    musky

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    Happened last year to me also. Original wheel, on a very old Tormek that was due for replacement anyway. Made use of it for another 9 months by super gluing the crack. Eventually I had a crack going the opposite way also. Kept using it as I couldn't make my mind up as to replace it with a standard wheel, CBN wheel, or just throw it out and just use my Wolverine jig. My shaft and nut was totally rusted, and needed to be replaced also. I have three jigs for the Tormek with locked settings of 2,3,and 4, and really like the results that I get, and the speed at which I get them, on certain tools. It just takes one to two flops, and I'm done. Decision was made for me when a friend who knew I was looking for one, picked one up at an auction for me. T-7 I think, like new, and $150. Paid him, thanked him, and gave him my old unit for free. He is still using it. I really, really, like my Tormek, but only because I have multiple jigs that I can keep there settings locked. I have created fixed settings for the Wolverine jig also, by drilling and tapping in cap screws at my common settings so that the arm buts up against the cap, and gives very repeatable grinding.
     
    Last edited: Nov 7, 2017
  6. Bill Boehme

    Bill Boehme Administrator Staff Member

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    It's a slow speed wet grinder. The worst thing that might happen is when the halves fall into the tray and splash dirty water on Gary. Oh, the humanity. :D
     
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  7. Bill Boehme

    Bill Boehme Administrator Staff Member

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    So, I'm not the only one who has three gouge jigs. :)
     
  8. musky

    musky

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    May have four jigs soon, but I have too wait till the wheel on the one I gave away finally lets go. Then again, It could last for years, and I never will get a fourth jig.
     
  9. Gary Beasley

    Gary Beasley

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    Well it could do what every other falling object in the shop does and land on my foot.
     
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  10. hockenbery

    hockenbery AAW Advisor Staff Member

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    The tormek turns slowly. Not danger of flying debris.
    It is also a heavy wheel. A fallin wheel part might damage the water tray or break a toe if you are slow.
     
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  11. Bill Boehme

    Bill Boehme Administrator Staff Member

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    I didn't want to mention that one. I have a bad habit of using a foot to catch dropped things. Probably an inherited reflex from my forebears somewhere up the line. A new stone is really heavy ... Possibly more than ten pounds. Half of a worn out stone is still heavy and has some sharp corners.

    I think that I have finally cured myself of that reflex action when it comes to turning tools. Have I mentioned how well the Tormek can sharpen a skew?
     
  12. john lucas

    john lucas

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    Bill As a photographer I saved many lenses by slowing the fall down with my foot. It's been a habit for years to either catch or slow the fall of things I drop. In the shop I have to remember that it's a chisel, spread your legs and watch where it falls, don't catch it. I did have a skew fall off the lathe one time and actually stuck in the arch of my foot. Hurt like hell.
     
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  13. Fred Belknap

    Fred Belknap

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    New rule: Wear steel toe boots when turning and sharpening.:oops:
     
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  14. John Torchick

    John Torchick

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    Sign in an office- Compared to me, Murphy was an optimist.
     
  15. Gary Beasley

    Gary Beasley

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    Right, steel toes shoes give you false confidence, piece will land right behind the toe cap and still hurt like hell!
     
  16. Mike Johnson

    Mike Johnson

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    Duct Tape or CA glue works nicely to quickly seal off a tool penetration in flesh. :D:eek:
    Medical grade CA glue is used for a variety of medical mending of human anatomy.
    The major difference between medical and commercial grade CA is the container and the price.
     
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  17. Raul McCai

    Raul McCai

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    Well here's my take. The shaft enlarged from corrosion and that split the wheel. The shafts are steel. Even if they are SST corrosion is an issue. By being continually wet the odds are good that the O2 level in the water around them will drop. When that happens corrosion sets in pretty quickly. It's why one does not use SST screws in a boat hull. Low O2 in water lets the Passive Chrome-Oxide layer dissipate without replenishment. SST needs lots of O2 to keep the passive layer working

    There's Chrome in the SST. the Chrome literally migrates to the surface where that chrome bonds to oxygen and forms chrome oxide which is why SST is Stainless, Strip it away with some thing like Hydrochloric acid and or many food acids and water and you can get pitting and rust. So unless your grinder has an inconel or other non corroding metal shaft the possibility of the shaft enlarging and splitting the wheel is not inconsiderable.

    I wonder if it is possible to saturate the wheel with oil before installing thus prevent the water from getting to the shaft for a very long time.
     
  18. John Torchick

    John Torchick

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    You can get three tubes of CA glue at the Dollar Tree. I keep it on hand all the time.
     
  19. Bill Boehme

    Bill Boehme Administrator Staff Member

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    I buy it by the quart. That way I I can glue my hand to whatever I'm holding in a very cost effective manner. :D
     
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