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What glue for segmented salad bowl?

Discussion in 'Woodturning Discussion Forum' started by pencheff, Mar 30, 2006.

  1. pencheff

    pencheff

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    Now that I have a 16" swing lathe my daughter is already hinting that she'd like a big salad bowl. Sounds like fun. I'd like to do a segmented piece, all maple, 12 or 24 segments per ring. This brings up the question: What adhesive should I use for a utility piece like this? For the simple segmented pieces I've done to date I've simply used Titebond II. But what do I use for something that is going to be submerged in water all the time when being washed?
     
  2. georgetroy

    georgetroy

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    I would try Titebond III. I have used a bottle of it and it glues and bonds just as well as Titebond II. The color is a light brown. The segmented pieces glued together was maple just like you are talking about. I only know from the claims that it is water proof. GT
     
  3. n7bsn

    n7bsn

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    Submerged?
    I never submerge a wooded bowl/plate in water. It's a great way to wreck em.
    But Tibbett's book on segmented bowls, he states he uses Titebond (mostly)
     
  4. Malcolm Tibbetts

    Malcolm Tibbetts

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    Greg,
    I see no reason to use anything other than Titebond (I, II, or III). Perhaps in this case, the II or III would be slightly better than the original. I would suggest not soaking any wooden bowl (segmented or otherwise) during washing. A quick rinse and a drying towel should be sufficient. Good luck.
    Malcolm
     
  5. Frank Kobilsek

    Frank Kobilsek

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    Titebond III Story

    I made a shaving cup from cherry, segmented. Assembled it with Titebond III and it's still together after almost two years of constant damp. The wood on the interior of the cup is very water stained but the bonds are holding. It was one of my first segmented projects that I made from the leftover filler strips for the new bathroom cabinet. My segmented jointery was not the greatest so I didn't expect it to last this long.

    Note Titebond III has a much longer open time so plan to space your assembly sessions about twice the time as you would with I or II. III also works at lower temps than I or II so I have choose it for that reason in the past more so than for water-proofness.

    Frank
     
  6. tomcatmartin

    tomcatmartin

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    Has anyone tried polyurethane glue for segment turning? It is supposed to be waterproof.
     
  7. Brian Hahn

    Brian Hahn

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    Don't use epoxy

    I wanted waterproof joints on my first segmented bowl and used epoxy. Two big problems: the glue will soak into the wood and leave a glue-starved joints; and if the joints don't line up perfectly you can see light through the gap. And a third problem: the epoxy I used was too brittle and the bottom joint failed on one of the bowls. But it was waterproof.

    Yellow glue works a lot better!

    What can a say, that was 15 years ago and the only information I had was an article in Fine Woodworking #54 (Sept 1985) by Addie Draper and But Latven.
     
  8. n7bsn

    n7bsn

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    wet use

    Frank
    Something I do for "wet use" is EnviroTex. It's a clear two part finish. It's really intended for a heavy coat finish. But I have found that if I wash it around on the inside, the pour off the excess I get a good finish for mugs/goblets/mazers/etc

    TTFN
    Ralph
     
  9. Bill Boehme

    Bill Boehme Administrator Staff Member

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    Any of the yellow glues should work fine, but as mentioned earlier Titebond III has a longer open time. That is good news, but it can also be bad new because you will need to wait a bit longer before you will be able to turn a new ring after gluing it in place.

    The demo at our last club meeting was on doing segmented vessels and the most important information that I gathered on gluing is the following:
    1. glue is not a gap filler -- it doesn't look good and is weak.
    2. the strength of the bond comes from the glue that has soaked into the wood, not the glue sitting on top of the wood.
    3. hide glue will creep over time.
    4. Press the parts together very tightly to squeeze out all of the excess glue.
    Hope this helps.

    Bill
     
  10. Woodbutcher

    Woodbutcher

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    I use polyurethane glue for all turning glue ups have never tryed segment turning though . I use polyurethane glue for flat work also It will never fail
    and I mean never . Must be well clamped for several hours the glue is kicked by moisture and will create lots of pressure while curing . I use extremely thin coat slight warming helps ( in the shop nuker for a few seconds ). The cured glue is far less damaging to cutting edges than any other glue . Is truely waterproff not water resistant . My oldest turning in the field right now is about 12 years with exterior stain 14" dia at one point to about 6 1/2" dia to the smallest section . Bored through the center for a weathervane mast 1" dia for the total height of 6' . One year ago while staining the tower,and greasing the weather vane I noticed that the glue joints on the turned tower as well as the rest of cupulia ,have not failed . To me this is Impessive For N. E. winters can be extremely harsh . I very seldom use any other glue.

    Good luck
    Matt
     
  11. quartlow

    quartlow

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    Titebond II or III whichever is handy.

    I tossed a glue up out the door one day, on to the woodpile in the snow, it layed out there all winter, spring, summer, and part of the following winter. till it got tossed in the woodburner. Not one failed joint.
     
  12. Woodbutcher

    Woodbutcher

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    Ralph , that is a really neat idea. I looked into it once because my shower walls are covered in 2' x 2' brass ceiling panels so we did some serious research on how to glue them to Marine plywood ,Buy we also had to finnish them to seal the seams . Unfortunatly Enviro Tex I was afraid of its bonding abilty to polished brass , But definatly like the washing idea.

    I did use Polyurathane Glue , Then I laid down 2 gal. of Pre Catalized Lacquer on the 36 sq. ft. surround , Deffinatly the day I was Happy to have a H.V.L.P. spayinng laquer in a shower aint fun But I got a real Golden Shower and everyone thinks it great.

    click for picture:

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Apr 4, 2006
  13. n7bsn

    n7bsn

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    I don't know how worried I would be about the brass, but it really does want to run down hill. The shower sounds really impressive.
     
  14. windcrestfarm

    windcrestfarm

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    My backdrop is made of wood panels assembled like large kitchen cabinet doors. I used Titebond II for some joints and polyurethane glue for others. Over the winter my contraption to hold the panels in the rafters of our car port failed and the whole thing came crashing down, almost missing my wife's car. The Titebond II joints held perfectly (wood splintered) all the poly joints seperated. Could be the wood was too dry, don"t know.
     
  15. Bill Boehme

    Bill Boehme Administrator Staff Member

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    Sorry to hear that it fell on your wife's car -- so, are you still sleeping in the garage?

    Bill
     
  16. Woodbutcher

    Woodbutcher

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    I sure hope you have been forgiven about the car Poly glues will work down to about 40 degrees of course like any thing else warmer is better . I have personally found Gorilla Glue To work the best out of the poly glues , you mentioned the wood being dry , if the glue did not foam then there was not enough moisture. living in the N.E. I rarlley run into this but the makers of such products do suggest wipping ome side of the joint with a damp cloth, I have very seldom done this,and when I do the foaming reaction is usually much more intense . So I try to limit this to a fast wipe with a damp washcloth. Everyone has thier own opinions but before giving up on poly glue I would give it another try . It scrapes so easy and is so nice to cutting edges, I have never hade show up after spraying a finnish like yellow glue.
    Good Luck
    Matt
     

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