What is the difference between........

Discussion in 'Woodturning Discussion Forum' started by odie, Oct 13, 2017.

  1. odie

    odie

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  2. Steve Worcester

    Steve Worcester Admin Emeritus

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    Chatoyance has to do with the way the light hits it and it "glows" or radiates, like a striped maple or curly woods. Translucence would be how you can see the wood through the translucent dye, or a level of which light passes through.
     
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  3. john lucas

    john lucas

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    Steve nailed it. Chatoyance usually changes when you either move one way or the other or move the light source as you look at it. It's impossible to photograph to show both view of chatoyance. You can shift the light and get 2 different photos sometimes looking like 2 different pieces of wood.
     
  4. Gerald Lawrence

    Gerald Lawrence

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    To me chatoyance is the reflection of light back at different angles and translucent would be the passage of light such as what Steve said THRU the finish
     
  5. Bernie Hrytzak

    Bernie Hrytzak

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    Chatoyance may be described as having pearlescent characteristics.
     
  6. hockenbery

    hockenbery AAW Advisor Staff Member

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    All good descriptions. Translucent is some that light passes through the wood and wood glows when back lit.
    Chatoyance is the reflection of light in different directions giving a sparkle effect.

    The pictured bowl has only chatoyance. I sees no light coming through the wood.

    Many wet woods are translucent until they dry since the water retransmits light like fiber optics.
    I turn light woods with a lamp to a color that matches a thickness I want.
    White is a hole, yellow is thin enough.
     
  7. odie

    odie

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    So, how about it? What best describes the bowl in this link to a current entry to the gallery?

    I thought it was beautiful, but had a hard time deciding, prior to commenting.

    -----odie-----
     
  8. Bill Boehme

    Bill Boehme Administrator Staff Member

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    Definitely chatoyance.

    Here is an example of something that is translucent ... a white plastic shield over a fluorescent light fixture. The light from the bare bulb passes through the plastic and is diffused to reduce glare. This different than sunglasses which are transparent but absorb some of the light passing through it.
     
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  9. Lamar Wright

    Lamar Wright

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    Odie, that beautiful curly fiddelback maple salad bowl you displayed in the gallery had a similar look to Chatoyance to me. It also reminded me of water reflection on the side of the piece. Very beautiful indeed.
     
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  10. odie

    odie

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    OK, thanks Lamar.......

    If anyone can post an example photo of translucence, I'd appreciate that.....

    -----odie-----
     
  11. Raul McCai

    Raul McCai

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  12. Bill Boehme

    Bill Boehme Administrator Staff Member

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    If you ever sautéed onions, they start out somewhat opaque and they become translucent when they're done.

    Frosted glass which is often used on bathroom windows is another example of something that is translucent.

    Lampshades are translucent.

    Here is a picture of a translucent sphere.

    image.jpeg
     
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  13. Emiliano Achaval

    Emiliano Achaval

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    Search Ron Kent Hawaii woodturner. His NIP bowls are all translucent, very thin, some of the curly ones you could say they have chatoyance too...
     
  14. john lucas

    john lucas

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    I will post a photo later today showing Chatoyance..
     
  15. odie

    odie

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    John......This is one of my bowls currently in the AAW gallery.
    [​IMG]
    I believe what we're seeing here is chatoyance. The bowl was positioned in the photo for maximum light effect......but, if it's rotated some, the chatoyance changes.

    If I'm understanding this correctly, translucence is a visual effect that doesn't naturally occur in any wood.....but, is created by being very thin, so the light shows through.....or, translucence can be created by the addition of finishes, or something added to the wood. Anyone agree with that conclusion?

    -----odie-----
     
  16. Gerald Lawrence

    Gerald Lawrence

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    This is a turner doing demo at our club and this is translucence. IMG_9732.JPG
     
  17. odie

    odie

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    OK......I think I get it now......translucence is only when light shines, or penetrates completely through from one side to the other.......

    -----duh-----
     
  18. Zach LaPerriere

    Zach LaPerriere

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    I've been searching for a term that describes a translucent feel...the wood appears to glow as if the wood is a little translucent, though there is no actual light coming through. The look is similar to an all around medium level of chatoyance, though there is no variation and I don't think it's true chatoyance. I call it depth, or describe it a translucent feel.

    The wood that I turn where I see this often is western hemlock, and I don't think photos really capture the feel. Maybe this is part of what led this discussion?
     
  19. Bill Boehme

    Bill Boehme Administrator Staff Member

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    While you can do this with green wood to guage thickness while turning, the wood becomes opaque once dry. A few highly resinous softwoods, especially Norfolk Island Pine, when turned very thin will allow some light to pass through even after dry. To answer Odie's question, your understanding is correct. You can use an oil finish to give "depth" to the wood and while not technically fitting the meaning of translucency, it can still be a useful descriptive term for the appearance of a finish. Your conclusion is correct, Odie, it's not a characteristic of the wood, but rather what you do to it.

    Chatoyance is a term used to describe certain gemstones where the appearance and colors shift as the angle of the light source or the viewing angle changes. It's also a good descriptive word that fits the way that light is reflected in some species of highly figured wood such as Odie's maple bowl.
     
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  20. hockenbery

    hockenbery AAW Advisor Staff Member

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    Wood turned thin enough will be translucent regardless of species.
    I have seen quite a few bowls that were almost funnels that pass light through the bottom.
    One or two in my shop, a few more in classes, and a bunch brought to club show and tells.

    We have a NIP bowl about a 1/4 in thickness that is translucent.
     
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