What is the difference between........

Discussion in 'Woodturning Discussion Forum' started by odie, Oct 13, 2017.

  1. hockenbery

    hockenbery AAW Advisor Staff Member

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    Just what Wikipedia has to say.

    In gemology, chatoyancy (/ʃəˈtɔɪ.ənsi/ shə-TOY-ən-see), or chatoyance or cat's eye effect,[1] is an optical reflectance effect seen in certain gemstones. Coined from the French "œil de chat", meaning "cat's eye", chatoyancy arises either from the fibrous structure of a material, as in tiger's eye quartz, or from fibrous inclusions or cavities within the stone, as in cat's eye chrysoberyl.

    Chatoyancy in wood occurs in various species – particularly hardwoods, and particularly where stresses from the weight of the growing tree result in denser patches, or where stresses cause burl or bird’s eye. This ‘figure’, which has a striking three-dimensional appearance, is highly prized by woodworkers and their clients alike, and is featured regularly in furniture, musical instruments, and other decorative wood products. Figuring takes on a variety of forms and is referred to as flame, ribbon, tiger stripe, quilting, among other names.

    This effect is sometimes called wet look, since wetting wood with water often displays the chatoyancy, albeit only until the wood dries. Certain finishes cause the chatoyancy (also referred to as wood iridescence, moire, vibrancy, shimmer or glow) to become more pronounced. Oil finishes, epoxy, and shellac can strongly bring out the wet look effect.
     
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  2. Gerald Lawrence

    Gerald Lawrence

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    I agree with Al I have turned cherry to be translucent and is still somewhat "lighted" even when dry. It will have the effect somewhat like a lampshade.

    As to chatoyance I would say the light reflection ,which is what causes the appearance, will change with the angle of the light . Since we deal in mostly round objects this is not easily captured with photography and will cause you to continuously turn the object to see the full effect.
     
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  3. Lamar Wright

    Lamar Wright

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    I agree Odie, as I stated that looks like chatoyance to me. I believe that is what we are seeing in this bowl.
     
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  4. Lamar Wright

    Lamar Wright

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    You get chatoyance look when you mix translucent dyes with clear resin. I have made many pen blanks with the chatoyance look.
     
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  5. Bill Boehme

    Bill Boehme Administrator Staff Member

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    In order to see the apparent depth of ripple when the wood is actually smooth on the surface requires binocular vision. Close one eye while looking at a piece of figured maple and you see the differences in reflectance, but you don't see the illusion of textured depth that is the result of your eyes each viewing the piece from slightly different angles. The only way to capture it photographically is by using stereographic photography ... if you remember the old ViewMaster 3-D viewers.
     
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  6. Tim Egan

    Tim Egan

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    I bought a piece of ancient Kauri from Woodcraft, Which is supposed to be 30,000 years old or something like that, turned a wine goblet out of it. It had a fantastic chatoyance, looked different when you turned it. There's a website, Ancient woods or something that shows the chatoyance of this wood. It's nice but pretty pricey.
     
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  7. john lucas

    john lucas

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    Odie that appears to me to be Chatoyance. I didn't have time to shoot my piece yesterday but going to do that this morning before the sunlight in my shop becomes a problem.
     
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  8. Leo Van Der Loo

    Leo Van Der Loo

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    Translucence is just having or being able to see light passing through a substance or material that is not clear like glass or water, couple of turnings that show this.

    Thinwalled Beech bowl.jpg
    Thinwalled Norway Maple.jpg
    Paperthin Tulip wood.jpg
    Thinwalled Aspen.jpg

    While Chatoyance is the breaking-up and reflecting light by twisted grain in wood, and crystals and other impurities in stone that cause the same effect of light to reflect in non consistent ways, and to have the changing reflection of the light rays in a material when changing the angle of looking at it.

    Hard to get the changing light in a picture of course, but still apparent sometimes.

    Mulberry with Chatoyance.jpg
    Chatoyance in Mulberry.jpg
     
    Last edited: Oct 15, 2017
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  9. Curtis Fuller

    Curtis Fuller

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    I'd say the wood has some nice chatoyance. The dye being translucent allows the chatoyance to show through and even enhances it.
     
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  10. Bill Boehme

    Bill Boehme Administrator Staff Member

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    Here is an example from my gallery showing the use of dyes to enhance the chatoyance in a piece of maple.

    Rings Around Neptune
     
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  11. john lucas

    john lucas

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    Hope I can post this. I didn't move the camera or the lid. I simply moved the light.
     

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