What the heck is this?

Discussion in 'Woodturning Discussion Forum' started by Daniel Nero, Sep 6, 2017.

  1. Daniel Nero

    Daniel Nero

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    Does anyone know what this is? I found this tool among many lathe tools and am unable to identify it. It threads directly onto the spindle of my lathe, and I assume it's purposed to mount big blanks.

    Would be most appreciative for any response. Thank you

    1-1/4" x 8 TPI
    20170906_232738.jpg 20170906_232808.jpg 20170906_232707.jpg 20170906_232818.jpg 20170906_232720.jpg
     
  2. hockenbery

    hockenbery AAW Advisor Staff Member

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    pin chuck

    A small diameter steel rod goes in the flat (1/8"????)
    So you need to find a rod.
    Drill a hole the diameter of the large pin in a block of wood
    With the flat up put the small rod on it an slide the blank on.
    Lock the spindle and turn the blank which rolls the rod on the flat and locks the blank in place.

    To remove the blank lock the spindle and turn the blank the other way.

    If you would with green wood be sure to take it off the pins in an hour or the wood can warp closing on the pin then you have to chop it free with a chisel.

    Works like a screw chuck but on and off is much faster until you looks the little rod.
     
    Last edited: Sep 7, 2017
  3. Daniel Nero

    Daniel Nero

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    Thank you Hockenberry. I was able to find the precise make and model (PC1.25-8-1) I'm happy to learn what a ' Pin chuck ' is. I may order some pins. PinChuck.jpg
     
  4. Bill Boehme

    Bill Boehme Administrator Staff Member

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    Welcome come to the AAW forum, Daniel

    I'm glad that Al was able to answer the question. He is one of our forum experts who is able to provide helpful answers to almost any question. It had me stumped. Pin chucks at fairly rare these days, but they provide a way to very quickly mount and dismount bowls.
     
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  5. Zach LaPerriere

    Zach LaPerriere

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    Interesting. I'd considered getting a pin chuck a little while back but came to the conclusion from a little research that a screwchuck like the Oneway woodworm screw is just about as fast and likely more versatile—but I'd be open to hearing what others have to say.
     
  6. hockenbery

    hockenbery AAW Advisor Staff Member

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    The pin chucks are worth looking at if you are a production turner and do lots of rough out in succession. Also great for large blanks if you do not have a tailstock support.
    Negatives are Drilling a 1" hole and the rare occasion where the wood locks on and you have to chop it free. (could happen with as crew but the threads will help you)
    Might. Hold in some soft woods where a screw will strip out.

    The worm screw is more versital. 10mm hole easier to drill. With spacer around the screw you can use just a few threads or hold a platter blank. Becomes iffy with blanks over 18" diameter.


    I do most of my work starting between centers with spur drive. I d often position the center by drilling a
    shallow 1 1/4" hole through the bark.
     
    Last edited: Sep 7, 2017
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  7. Lamar Wright

    Lamar Wright

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    Welcome the the AAW forum Danial, you are going to like it here.
     
  8. Bill Boehme

    Bill Boehme Administrator Staff Member

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    Like Al, my preference is to start between centers to start the rough turning and then to put a tenon on the bottom for mounting in a scroll chuck.

    Mounting between centers offers many advantages such as the ability to mass balance the piece of wood and on natural edge turnings it is easy to aesthetically balance the piece. With a screw mount or pin chuck, once you drill the hole you are committed to that orientation.
     
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  9. Doug Rasmussen

    Doug Rasmussen

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    I knew what it was, but not the correct name of it. Ones I've seen before have 4 constrained (not loose) pins instead of only one so the work self centers on the arbor to a greater extent.

    A similar concept is used in one way rotation needle bearings. The wheel type anti-kick back hold downs for table saws use them.
     
  10. Richard Coers

    Richard Coers

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    Order some pins? For the pin chucks I make, I fit them so a roofing nail is the perfect size (1/8"). Yours looks like a deeper flat, so check a 16d nail. Also you can buy bar stock at the hardware store, etc.... Just buy enough for several pins, they have a way of finding the deepest pile of shavings when they fall. Also the pins should have nothing to do with self centering the blank. The chuck should fit snugly in the hole, and all the pin should do is be a lock to prevent rotation.
     
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  11. hockenbery

    hockenbery AAW Advisor Staff Member

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    Never thought of a nail. I have cut little steel rods that come In short lengths.
    Thick coat hanger might work.
    Nails are much easier.

    I will probably never use my pin chuck again - so now I've wasted a memory slot..... :)
     
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  12. john lucas

    john lucas

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    One problem with pin chucks is wood that is soft of punky. The pin just sort of digs in a little but then the wood expands and the chuck just rotates. I use a smaller variety all the time for my wine stoppers.
     
  13. Leo Van Der Loo

    Leo Van Der Loo

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    I find that the relative small shoulder makes for a larger and softer wood to start wobbling unless a tailstock is used to stabilize the piece, and yes a cut nail will make a good pin in the pin chuck.
    Also most pin chucks where just a rod with a flat on it and held in a chuck, real easy to loose the pin with that type :)
     
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  14. Raul McCai

    Raul McCai

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    I would rather use an expanding mandrill, but that pin chuck will catch the tube. Thing I don't l like is the stress in the one point.
     

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