Woodturning Smocks

Discussion in 'Woodturning Discussion Forum' started by Captain Eddie, Aug 23, 2007.

  1. jackaldridge

    jackaldridge

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    I have an alternative

    I've used a hospital smock given to me by a friend for months....it works really well because the material is smooth. It fastens with strings in the back and has a high neck.The sleeves have elastic cuffs and so present no real danger. A good shake after a turning session and all the debris falls off. Many hospitals throw this kind of stuff away after it has been opened and never even used. A good contact at the local OB or Surgery department ought to be able to supply you.
     
  2. jdsilwones

    jdsilwones

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    Ya but how do you keep the chips off you're bare bum?:D
     
  3. Captain Eddie

    Captain Eddie

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    Now what do I do about this vision I have in my head? Thanks.
     
  4. Joyce Baldauf

    Joyce Baldauf

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    Hi John ,

    One of the members of my local club wears on of these smocks. I was curious about it and upon looking at it closely, I saw a small "Lovell" tag on it. He bought it from Craft Supply and really likes it. Apparently Lovell makes them for Craft Supply. But Lovell does not advertise it on their site, so it must be an "exclusive" item.

    Joyce
     
  5. n7bsn

    n7bsn

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    I had avoiding thinking about that, until you brought it up....
     
  6. Captain Eddie

    Captain Eddie

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    I've had a Crafts Supply smock for about 6 or 7 years. It's kind of warm for our climate. It's holding up well and looks good. I like the velcro closures to keep the sleeves tight.
     
  7. Frank F

    Frank F

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    For what it's worth...

    I have the Lee Valley smock and like it. There are a pockets on the upper part of the sleeves. I keep a 6" rule and pencil in them and have never had a problem. The rule and pencils stays up and they don't fall out when I bend over. There is also a back pocket that is handy, but I don't think I miss if it were gone.

    Short sleeves would be an improvement. I too am a little aprehensive about long sleeves and spinning machinery.

    Frank
     
  8. American & Proud

    American & Proud

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    I bought my smock from another forum in Tan, which I like better than blue.

    It is the same one sold here bought through a "group buy".

    I like it, but the neck is tight when fully zipped, I am slowly getting used to that now.

    The flap over the front pocket is flimsy and will easily slip into the pocket allowing it to fill with chips. ( Looking for an American Flag patch the flaps size to sew onto the flap to give it some stiffness and fix that problem.)

    As mentioned above the front top pocket is DEEP so a pencil just falls into the pocket and a 6" rule falls at an angle and wedges in the pocket . To fix those I plan on sewing the pocket into divided sections. The pencil slit through the flap should have had a sewn divider in the pocket from the start, common sence in my book.

    As far as being too hot or too cold my garage/shop is heated and this year became AC'ed.

    I do want a long sleeved one too, as hairy arms hold alot of chips and dust.
    Hip-Pocket-in-view-web.jpg
     
    Last edited: Sep 28, 2007
  9. Jon Murphy

    Jon Murphy

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    A much belated entry to this thread

    Although this thread is "stale" some may still be referring to it (as I did a while back). I decided on the Lee Valley smock, after reading these reviews, when my Sorby's zipper went south (also the Sorby is quite warm, and short).

    I like the look of the AAW and Craft Supplies smocks, particularly the short sleeves, but my vote is for the light-weight version of the Lee-Valley. The key to my decision is the "two-way" zipper. As I have a prosthetic leg I sit down often, and being able to open the nearly knee length smock from the bottom is a boon. I don't like the knitted cuffs as it can get quite hot here in New Jersey in summer, so I have cut the sleeves to mid-forearm and sewn on Velcro closures. An easy fix, and one that gives me the best of two worlds. I can cover my forearms when I want to, with the closure to keep the cuffs out of the machine - or I can roll up the sleeves above the elbow if I want the ventilation.

    Another plus is that, like the Lovell and some others, one can fasten the neck collar with Velcro so one doesn't have to zip up to the collar (leaves a bit more ventilation). Pencil pockets on each sleeve, reinforced with a heavy dark material above and under the pocket (no pencil marks on the smock, no cuts from my mini ruler).

    I hope that this is of help to anyone coming newly to the thread.

    Best, Jon
     
  10. odie

    odie

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    If some enterprising outfit simply made something that covered the neck and tops of the shoulders, something that was easy on, easy off.....I'll bet they'd sell a lot of them.

    If this were an option, then the user could use whatever shirt, with or without sleeves and pockets, that suited them.

    ooc
     
  11. Bill Blasic

    Bill Blasic

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    I have both the green and tan versions of the Craft Supplies smock. These are my "Dress Smocks" which I use for demos in the warmer (tan) and colder (green) times of the year. For every day use I have two lab coats that I had cut down and they are made of cotton and retain enormous amounts of dust and I have the blue AAW smock that also sees use in the shop. I'm thinking about getting the 25th Anniversary Smock as a reminder of the symposium this year. All have the velcro closure at the neck and shorter sleeves except the lab coats which have tight cuffs at the wrist.
    Bill
     
  12. odie

    odie

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    This is very true......and the reason why I would require long sleeves on a smock. It wouldn't be terribly bad with dry shavings, I suppose, but when you are roughing unseasoned bowl blanks, the gummy crud that sticks to your arms is very annoying.

    If I were to design a smock, it would be as follows:



    *full length zipper on front......no pull-over design

    *neck protection, velcro closure ok

    *no pockets......none

    *full length sleeves with velcro closure on cuffs

    *a good addition to the full length sleeves would be to have them convertable to short sleeves......like convertable summer pants/shorts with a zippered lower leg. (this wouldn't be absolutely necessary, but I can see there being times where this might come in handy)

    *no monograms or initials for me.......this is just goofy!


    ooc


    Now that I've started a "wish list", what else would you want in a smock?

    I still think this following idea of mine would work fine for me.....and, it would be cheap to make:

     
  13. John Lawson

    John Lawson

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    I use an old nylon windbreaker. It's lightweight, zips up the front, has elastic cuffs on long sleeves, and has a ventilated back. It sheds shavings and chips with only a shake. It's only flaw is the lack of a neck closure. I've considered wearing it backwards, but haven't tried that out yet.
    It does have embroidery, but only because it was a premium I got for free.
     
  14. Glenn Barber

    Glenn Barber

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  15. odie

    odie

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    Hi Glenn.......Yes, as a matter of fact, I have seen that before......only the picture of it. I passed on that one, because it looked like an apron kind of arrangement would allow chips to enter the side. Don't know for sure, because I haven't tried it, but that was what I was thinking anyway. Thanks.

    I've been using a light nylon (?) sporty shirt for about the past five years that really works well.....except it's a pull-over design. Has long sleeves, zipper that starts at mid-chest and zips up to the tips of the collar which completely enclose the neck. Really, it's perfect, except for being pull-over, and at times, it's a hassle to take on and off. This one, I got at Goodwill for only a few bucks, but I'd buy several of this kind of shirt, if they had a full length zipper on the front.

    I intend to keep on using my current smock/shirt until something I feel is better for my particular needs comes along. I hope so, because this one is getting a little dilapidated!

    ooc
     

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  16. Steven Antonucci

    Steven Antonucci

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    another vote for an old t-shirt and jeans... keeps the mosquitoes off my legs!

    If you throw the shavings away from you, almost nothing gets on your t-shirt. Pulled down over my pants keeps most of the stuff out of my pants pockets. Almost always dressed to turn.

    S
     
  17. john lucas

    john lucas

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    One of my good friends who is a long time production turner has the best idea. A tank top, not tucked in, and often turns barefooted. The shavings just fall through and never get stuck in your socks and shoes. OK you gotta be an ex hippie to get away with this but it works for him. Of course if you in Hawaii, it's no shirt, bathing suit and sandals.
     
  18. Tim Hall

    Tim Hall

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    I have the older version of this one http://www.packardwoodworks.com/Mer...&Store_Code=packard&Category_Code=appr-smocks
    mine looks like the apron in the link above, but is a full coverage, in the summer it is kinda warm, in the winter it is nice until you move and feel that cold nylon. then its not so good, but a plus is you can turn just fine in the Tennessee winter and have a t-shirt under it.

    in the summer i use a lab coat, some have a velcro neck, and covered pockets, its fairly cool and sheds dust and shavings pretty good, and has a covered zipper.
     
  19. Harry Robinette

    Harry Robinette

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    I'm with Glen B I use the Packard apron in my shop all the time,and have for about 9 or 10 years now.My shop is in my walk out basement so I'm air cond. in the summer and heated in the winter, shop stays around 68* year round.
    I have never had chips get into it anywhere I know of neck,sides or anywhere and the pockets have large flats,no sleeves,closed collar and not hot or cold.:cool2:
     
  20. Michael Stafford

    Michael Stafford

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    A friend who turns lots of sopping wet green wood makes his own smocks from plastic tablecloth fabric he buys at the fabric stores. He cuts a slit in the center for his head to fit through (a la Clint Eastwood in The Good, the Bad and the Ugly) and ties a rope around his waist. He says he can make a poncho for less than $5....

    P.S. He is a very large man and to see him decked out in his red checked table cloth poncho, cut off jean shorts and brogans is quite the sight.:D
     

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