Your sandpaper choice above P800??

Discussion in 'Woodturning Discussion Forum' started by Jamie Straw, May 10, 2016.

  1. Gretch Flo

    Gretch Flo

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    For many years I did aerobics and the camaraderie was a stimulus to do it. Was avid for 3x/week. I was on NSAIDS for foot pain so I could do it. Peracutely, in 2002 as I was going to a national orthopedic meeting I got hauled out of the Flint, M airport by ambulance to a hospital for a week rather than enjoying my meeting and skiing. (Had a perforated stomach ulcer). My exercise stopped immediately. However there are 12 of us women thru this exercise at the YMCA that get together for ea others birthdays/xmas. My only exercise now is turning, hauling shavings up the basement steps, avid gardening, cutting/splitting firewood to heat the house and make wood blanks. Not very aerobic exercise, but fortunately I have low blood pressure, lo cholesterol, etc. When I got tested 5-6 years ago for life insurance, my rates were lowered as I was a premium/preferred customer.I don't want to take the time to get back into a exercise routine where i drive somewhere. Oh well, don't have Odie's gumption. On the other hand my physician daughter exercises 3x/day( except when nursing-then only BID)-an addict.
     
  2. john lucas

    john lucas

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    I've worked out hard all of my life. however at 66 things are getting really difficult. I have so much to do at the new house that it's been hard to get back into bicycling. that and the area rides just aren't as fun. I guess I just have to learn the routes. The only gym around is one of those 24hr things where you have your own key. Unfortunately most of the time I'm the only one there so it's not very much fun. I bought one of those Total Gyms that Chuck Norris advertises. It's surprisingly good but it's hard to do more than 15 minutes. Just gets boring. It's really difficult learning to stay fit with a body that want's to hurt all the time. I know really well what my grand parents meant by the term Stove Up. If I sit any length of time at all I can hardly stand up. Same with driving. It takes about 5 steps before my body relaxes to the point I can function. Fortunately once I get going I'm still in pretty good shape, I just have to leave the choke on longer to get the old motor running.
     
  3. Gretch Flo

    Gretch Flo

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  4. odie

    odie

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    I suppose each of us have our own circumstances to deal with......I'm 67, and I have to deal with aging related pains, just like everyone else does. With me, getting into a routine is half the battle.....and I've been exercising regularly for 12yrs now. It does help to have a partner, and I'm lucky to have a son who is a motivated football player. He's not here everyday, though......and there are days when I have to take charge of my mental inclinations to skip a workout. I've found in virtually every case, once I've started the exercise program that day, I'm glad that I did. There are times when I opt for extending the routine for that day, too.....and, I can guarantee that when I started the routine that day, I had no intention of doing any more than the minimum workout!

    I'm overweight, blood pressure is high, joints and muscles have aches and pains, internal plumbing isn't working as well as it should, etc. Regardless, "doing it" is more of a mental battle, than it is physical. :p

    There is one other thing that helps......I'm using an old fashioned hard-copy daily/monthly planner, and I enter the minutes I've exercised that day (plus a boat-load of other things I do regularly....like vitamins, garbage day, blood pressure readings, and so forth.).......the planner helps to keep me on track, as well.

    Whatever works.....and, we all need to seek out those things that keep us walking the straight line, and staying motivated. :D

    ko
     
  5. chrisdaniels

    chrisdaniels

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    if it counts i'm 27 and feel like i'm 87! Blew out my back when I was stationed in japan. had surgery on my spine that went bad so I don't walk much anymore. I do my turning sitting down so I don't fall on a large spinning object! Glad I found this thread, I was looking into ordering some 2" discs since my 3" were a bit too large. Ordered a pack of all of them up to 1000 and some pads from steve. looking forward to seeing what all the hype is about this abranet stuff!
     
  6. Paul A Andrews

    Paul A Andrews

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    Actually I've used the grocery bags with great results. They're hard to find now. Bags are usually plastic or of a paper that doesn't have the makeup you want.
     
  7. Gretch Flo

    Gretch Flo

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    And the difference is???. The grocery paper bags my store (meijers mostly). rip by the time you get them into the car. Kroger , on the other hand has better/larger bags. Is there a difference in their '"sanding abilities????". I have used in the past when i was sanding bowls to 1000+,, but can't remember if they did any good. Gretch
     
  8. John K Jordan

    John K Jordan

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    My hands-down favorite for 600-1000 is Rhynowet, a red paper with a tough and flexible backing. I like this better than any of the wet/dry papers I've used. If it loads up I can usually wipe it off against my jeans and continue. I cut the sheets into about 1"x3" strips and keep them at hand in small plastic bins.

    I primarily use the 600 but often go to 800 and higher with exotics. With a smooth cut in blackwood or cocobolo on small things (finger tops, finials, etc) I often start with 600 and go to 1000. The higher grits are great for acrylic and brass, then I go to micromesh if I want a real polish. (I'm using the same micromesh kit I got in the '70s to restore a Cessna windshield - it was less than 1/2 the cost of a lesser kit today!)

    JKJ
     
  9. Zach LaPerriere

    Zach LaPerriere

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    Just talked with a buddy who reminded me of wool. He loves the polish it puts on, similar to buffing. Time to save that old sweater!
     
  10. Richard Avram

    Richard Avram

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    Does anybody here use micro-mesh? I don't use it until after I have started applying finish (usually wipe on poly) but I find that I get a much better finish if I use it between coats. I usually start with 2400 after the first coat and as the finish gets better I will work my way to around 6000. I have also found that if I happen to get a slight blemish in one of the coats I can buff it out with the 2400 and then work my way back up. You can remove the blemish and bring the finish back like it was never there.
     
  11. Jamie Straw

    Jamie Straw

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    Wow, I take it you haven't used the Micromesh kit very often? The '70's were a long time ago, I think I was young then.:cool: Thanks for the tip on Rhynowet, if I can find a small quantity on retail, I'll try it out. Once I have some good, solid designs for the stoppers, I'll be turning more exotics, hopefully.
     
  12. Jamie Straw

    Jamie Straw

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    How about Costco wool-blend socks? They're quite comfortable. I don't think I have anything that's 100% wool any longer.
     

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