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Thread: Nova DVR vs. Jet 1642 lathe

  1. #1

    Default Nova DVR vs. Jet 1642 lathe

    I am trying to decide between a Nova DVR and a Jet 1642 1.5 hp. I would use the DVR swiveled 22 degrees for hollowing to avoid leaning over the bed. I am concerned the lightweight bed would not stand heavy work swiveled. Also wonder about reliability of a computer-run lathe. And getting it repaired.
    I haven't seen a Jet. Sounds like a good basic lathe. It's $600 less. And heavier, more stable.
    Any experiences with either?
    Thanks. Frank.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Cookeville TN USA
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    Default

    I've turned on both and I've owned a Nova 3000 and now own a Powermatic 3520. When I upgraded I looked at all of them. What I didn't like about the Nova was the motor being part of the headstock. If it should go bad and they happen to discontinue that model how would you get it fixed. With most other lathes you can simply replace the motor.
    Another thing I didn't like about the Nova was re-aligning the headstock after you turn it. I had the double morse taper but it was a hassle. There were some little things about the electronics on the DVR that bothered me.
    The Jet 1642 is an excellent lathe. It's heavy. The sliding tailstock makes it easy to hollow bowls and vessels off the end. It never gets out of alignment because it doesn't rotate. It does have a 3 phase motor and variable frequency drive but either one can be replaced with after market stuff if necessary.
    The DVR is a good lathe and many people like it. I just personally like the Jet better.

  3. #3
    Ron Sardo Guest

    Default

    Have you looked at this lathe?

    http://www.lagunatools.com/platinumlathe1.htm

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    wetter washington
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    843

    Default

    Frank
    Two years ago I faced the same questions you did. My final call was the DVR-XP.

    First, I would not try a large vessel, on the Nova, off-axis. The tool support, etc is simply not up to the task (and I have the out-board tool rest).

    Second, if you are really worried that Teknatool will stop marketing the motor (they don't make it, someone else does), there will be 3rd party support, but it will (probably) not be cheap.

    Third, if space is an issue, the DVR-XP is the clear winner

    Fourth, the DVR-XP produces more power on 220, without swapping out the motor (Teknatool says 2HP, no it's not a myth or mere marketing)

    Fifth, if you need a different height, then the factory height, the DVR-XP lends it self to a custom lathe stand more.

    For me, and my needs, the Nova came out ahead, and I think it still would.
    Making sawdust mostly, sometimes I get something else, but that is more by accident then design.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    Lincoln Hills, CA (At the foot of the Sierra Nevada Mountains)
    Posts
    313

    Default Here is a good discussion on your question

    Jerry Hall
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  6. #6
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
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    Wimberley, Texas
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    Default

    Valid point by N7 about the height of the Jet. After laboriously installing the screw-in (height adjuster) feet, I laboriously un-installed them. Am 5'-8" tall and the Jet is at about the right elevation for me without the funky feet. Have the 2hp (220v) version, but doubt if there is much difference between it and the 1.5hp (110v) version.
    Richard in Wimberley

  7. #7

    Default

    Over the bed is the way to go for leverage, certainly. The way to cut your lean is to bring the lathe bed to the front of your stand, using only the slant of the legs to resist the torque. Unless you're strongly left-handed this puts you within five-six inches of centerline with an arm that already extends out from your body at the shoulder. Unless you have an extreme pear-shape, it's pretty easy to work that way. Looking inside sucks, of course.

    NB Don't look and blow sawdust at the same time.

    The captive tools are the way to go if you're a wooden pottery type, and they give you a bit more lateral separation on the handle.

    For other work, you get the versatility of the DVR with its high reliability motor. VR motors are simpler than induction, run by more complex electronics. There's the weak point.
    Stand clear, rest near, and cut the wood as it wishes to be cut.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Eugene, OR
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    Default

    I had a couple of my tools rewired so 1 hp and a 1 1/2 hp motor ran on 220. There was a big difference in how they ran. While I am not an electrical engineer, everything I have read says that any motor, 1 1/2 hp and above should run on 220. There was a thread at Google's rec. woodturning about a guy trying to rewire his DVR to 220. Apparently is isn't the same as a standard motor for the wiring. He said that the Nova is 1 1/2 at 110v, and1 3/4 at 220v. Personally, more hp is better, even if you don't turn many bigger things, the extra power just maked everything easier/less effort. Personally as far as the sliding head stock vs the pivoting headstock, I have never trusted the pivoting ones due to allignment problems (however minor) and the estended tool rests (it makes the tool rest borderline overextended). To me, ergonomically the slider just makes more sence. I have had the PM for 8 years, and am stepping up to the Robust. The main deciding factor in the Robust over the Oneway is the sliding headstock.
    robo hippy

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Cookeville TN USA
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    Having had 2 lathes with rotating headstock and now one with sliding headstock, I prefer the sliding. Everything is just more solid and the you don't have the compromise of the tool rest issue which can be a real pain. the downside of sliding headstock is the floor space needed to really use it properly.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Ballard (Seattle) WA and Volcano, Hawaii....on top of Kilauea Volcano
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    284

    Default

    I had a chance to use a Nova DVR for a day and was not impressed with the build. I also did not like the head realignment deal.

    Our Honolulu Woodcraft has a number of the Nova's for use as student lathes and they are not happy with the quality either. To be fair, students are tough on equipment, but still, these things are not used much at all compared to the use even a hobbiest woodturner will put on them.

    I own a jet 1642 2HP 220V and am very happy with it. I slide the head to the tail end of the lathe to hollow and do outboard turning. Very stable and convenient and physically comfortable. I do need some extra space at the end of the lathe to do this however, a disadvantage to this approach. I have not purchased an outboard tool rest yet, but am seriously considering the VicMark bolt on model that others have described here as fitting the Jet with a little bit of futzing.

    For what it is worth.

    Dave
    Dave Somers
    Ballard (Seattle), WA and Volcano, HI

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