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Thread: Acceptable chuck runout

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Conover Wi.
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    16

    Default Acceptable chuck runout

    Have a Oneway 2436 with .000 runout at the spindle. Also have a Vicmark chuck with less than .003 runout on the outer diamiter. Just purchased a new Oneway Stronghold, that came with .006 runout on the outer diamiter. I could visably see it move. After taking the taper adaptor on and off a few times, I have now got the runout down to about .004. Is this good enough, does it really matter, or should I be calling Oneway?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Newport, Oregon
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    51

    Default

    I'm not sure what the taper adapter is but I would have troubles mentally if I could see my chuck wobble while I turn, weather it made any difference or not. With that said I would true up some stock in the chuck and the turn it around and re-chuck it a few times to see how it looks. Technically at some point the chuck error will be magnified in the work and then you can decide how big your problem really is.
    Best of luck,
    Dave
    jonathan
    Oregon Coast Woodturners

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Gladstone, Mi (the UP)
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    95

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    call oneway and ask them what the runout +/- is WITHOUT mentioning what your measurement is. Typically, a tech service person will ask what you have and somehow it seems to fall right in the accepted tollerance! I have never dealt with Oneway, I am talking generally. If your lathe runout is really actually zero, that is incredible. Runout drives me CRAZY in any machine. .006 will be magnified as you go further out from where you are measuring and it seems pretty high to me, especially if you can see it!

  4. #4

    Default Similar Problem

    Have a similar problem...

    I have a Nova SN2, and until I just bought a new Jet Mini, but I had a Delta 46-700 w/ huge runout. I can't remember what the machine shop said exactly, but I don't really know how to measure it, or know if I have the right tools to do so...any help?

    My problem is when I put my SN2 chuck on the brand new mini - I discovered the body of the chuck still has visual runout. Much better than on the Delta, but I had attributed all of it to the lathe.

    Ugh...I hate runout too. Such a pain

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Cookeville TN USA
    Posts
    4,379

    Default

    I've had some crappy lathes and poorly made chucks over the year and still turned some awfully nice pieces. I don't think it really matters except in certain circumstances where you might be using the tailstock to drill holes or some other super precision process. I've done a lot of 2 part pieces there you had to have some very precise lips for glue joints and still no problems.
    That being said i love a machine with no runout. If the spindle doesn't have any runout then I would check the mating surfaces between the lathe a chuck. Even the smallest amount of dirt will keep it from setting flush and cause runout. I'm not that familiar with the oneway inserts but based on the many positive things I hear about Oneway customer service, you will get a no BS response and they will gladly help you.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    SF California Bay Area
    Posts
    20

    Default

    I would be less concerned about the outside diameter of the chuck having a little run out than the object chucked in it having run out. I would mount a known true cylinder/rod in the chuck and measure it for run out. That would tell you if the chuck it is really out of tolerance.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Plano Texas
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    2,352

    Default

    I would measure the runout on the taper first. If it is accepatable, mount it on the chuck and use a dab of never-sieze or such in the taper.
    Then I would measure the chuck run out. It most likely will run high on one side, mark that side and tighten the bolt on the opposite side and measure again. It is usually from uneven torque on the bolts that causes runout. You should be able to get it way down. Don't crank down too much as you may snap the bolts.
    Steve Worcester
    www.turningwood.com for your turning tools and sanding needs!
    Become a Turningwood fan on Facebook!

    Turn a bowl- feed the hungry

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    Wimberley, Texas
    Posts
    882

    Default Taper adapter?

    Steve,
    For Dave and me, what is the "taper adapter"?
    Tend to agree w/ JWTaylor. Runout of the chuck body O.D. is irrelevant. Don't the Oneway chucks have straight jaws? if so, chucking a short, clean piece of CRS or the equivalent might be the way to check runout. Can't get very excited about .006 runout. My cheap (oops, economy) chuck is much worse than that, but grips the wood well and rotates it. And after just a little extra spot sanding a couple tear out places, the piece isn't round anymore, even if it was perfect a few minutes ago.

    Chakajo- Runout is often measured with a dial indicator. One might use a magnetic base to hold the d.i. The base would be "stuck" to the lathe ways and the indicator positioned on centerline with the tip against the chuck O.D. or whatever one is checking. The spindle is rotated by hand and the total range of movement is indicated by the d.i. Hope this helps.
    Richard in Wimberley

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Conover Wi.
    Posts
    16

    Default chuck runout

    Thank you, everyone for your responses. Yes, the spindle face reads dead zero, and both it and the chuck mating surfaces are clean. As to the taper adaptor, I thought I might be able to pull it inline by the amount of tightness, but no such luck, as it is off 90 degrees to the screws. Also tried to rotate the adaptor 180 degrees, and ended up with slightly more runout. Too bad there isn't three screws holding the adaptor in, instead of two. Not sure if I have a straight round rod to chuck, and check that for runout, but will see what I can come up with. Will call Oneway on Monday, to see what they say. I also feel that they will not try to BS me, but would only want to make things right, if there were a problem.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Northwest territory, USA
    Posts
    3,022

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Texian View Post
    Steve,
    For Dave and me, what is the "taper adapter"?
    Tend to agree w/ JWTaylor. Runout of the chuck body O.D. is irrelevant. Don't the Oneway chucks have straight jaws? if so, chucking a short, clean piece of CRS or the equivalent might be the way to check runout. Can't get very excited about .006 runout. My cheap (oops, economy) chuck is much worse than that, but grips the wood well and rotates it. And after just a little extra spot sanding a couple tear out places, the piece isn't round anymore, even if it was perfect a few minutes ago.

    Chakajo- Runout is often measured with a dial indicator. One might use a magnetic base to hold the d.i. The base would be "stuck" to the lathe ways and the indicator positioned on centerline with the tip against the chuck O.D. or whatever one is checking. The spindle is rotated by hand and the total range of movement is indicated by the d.i. Hope this helps.


    The "taper adaptor" Musky refers to is that removable part on the back of the chuck that adapts the chuck to your spindle thread size.

    I have a Oneway Stronghold chuck, and have never checked for runout.

    I would think a little runout will make absolutely no difference at all, until you rechuck. If you use a chuck to rough out a bowl, and then rechuck after the bowl warps, I would imagine there too.....it would make little, if any, noticeable difference, since your stock has changed shape. I'm sure there is a point where runout would be a consideration.....but it would have to be much more than .oo6".

    My suggestion, for those of you who want a perfect match when you rechuck, is to mark your stock with a reference point that will match a particular feature of the chuck. That way, you'll get the stock back into the chuck with the same orientation between the two. But, then again.....I think some of you are worrying about something that won't be a practical consideration in bowl turning.

    There is a reason why John Lucas has had great success with chucks that are less than perfect......it isn't that critical!

    otis of cologne

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