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Thread: How do you sharpen an asymmetrical grind deep fluted gouge?

  1. #21

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    I think the runs you get when presenting the gouge are a result of the cutting egde not being perfectly neutral at the point of contact. The assemetrical grind effectively makes the cutting edge shorter on the swept back side of the gouge. When the edge makes contact, it is at an angle to the rotation, and causes the gouge to skate. Brute force to hold it in posititon until there is enough notch for the bevel to register against is one way to control the skate. When I try using brute force for control, it always fails me at the worst time. You might try closing the flute a few more degrees at entry to bring the longer part of the gouge into a more neutral mode and then open the flute after the cut is established, or, try grinding the conventional side of the flute just a bit shorter. Grinding that side of the flute a bit shorter will result in the portion of the egde making initial contact more neutral and less apt to skate.

    I do see the advantage in having the right side of the flute with a more blunt bevel, but I don't think I am going to give it a try. I keep a conventional grind with a blunt angle in the tool rack for those parts of a bowl that need it.

    I also see the advantage of using the soft spot of the belt to get a convex bevel for use inside a bowl. I see no advantage of a convex bevel on the outside of a form though.

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
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    Los Angeles, California
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    Excellent notes Dale. By the way, after standing correctly, I managed to position the tool the following way:

    Handle down, so the cutting edge was about 30 degrees.
    Flute closed and even tilted some more.

    But, what I'd like to point out here is that, by doing a freehand sharpening, the tool might not work as it used to work previously---there's a little accent in there.

    I so wish there was a jig for it. John Lucas said something can be done with a Wolverine jig, but I'm trying to figure out from where to get my third hand in order to move the jig up and down ***little humor here!***
    Jake Gevorgian
    On YouTube at http://www.youtube.com/paloarteinc
    Elsewhere at http://goo.gl/IApbE

  3. #23
    Join Date
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    Jake I'll be in the shop tonight, at least for a little while. I'll see what I can come up with on the jig thing. I know what you mean about sharpening angles. That's why I went with a jig. When I was new every time I sharpened it was a little different, usually with lots of facets. I should have gone into shaping diamonds because I was really good at getting all sorts of facets.
    I really don't think you need the asymetrical grind and it's much easier to do either the Ellsworth or traditional grind. If you watch my sharpening video's you will see the Stewart Batty grind which is similar to the right side of your gouge only both sides have the same grind. This is done with just a tool rest so it would be an easy grind to do on your sander. The Ellsworth or Wolverine jig type of grind is like the left side of your tool. Either one work fine for turning bowls. You would have to rig up a sort of pivot point for either the Ellsworth or Wolverine jig to be able to use your belt sander but it does work, I've done it on my sander.

  4. #24
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
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    Thanks John. Would love to see what you've came up with. I'm also working on some ideas here -- just passing them into the paper. No scientific tests have been performed yet, especially when I have to work in the cabinet shop all day...at the end of the day I'm pretty exhausted. Ah, the paperwork is still due! Darn, I hope my clients don't find me out here.
    Cheers
    Jake Gevorgian
    On YouTube at http://www.youtube.com/paloarteinc
    Elsewhere at http://goo.gl/IApbE

  5. #25
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
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    Jake I played with the jig a little. It would be a pain. you can use the wolverine jig to do the nose and left side but you would have to slide the jig to the right and up to grind the right side. That won't work with the V arm and you would probably be doing that movement somewhat freehand anyway.
    In reality the solution is not the grind you are using it's how you are using the tool. I would love to make a quick video to show you but I'm working the next 14 days straight with very little time to play in the shop. Maybe after graduation May 6th I'll have some time although I believe we have some sort of assignment on May 7yh also. College Photographers never get to rest, especially when they are interviewing and hiring a new president.

  6. #26
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
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    Niles, IL
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    I think John described it beautifully. Proper tool presentation when starting a cut makes all the difference. The rudder anaolgy was also quite accurate.
    Thomas Stegall
    AAW #38269

    Board Member
    Chicago WoodTurners

    Producer of homemade wood mulch and round firewood.

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