Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 14

Thread: Accessible lathe program

  1. #1

    Default Accessible lathe program

    This thread is to discuss the Accessible Lathe program, initiated by the AAW. Please join in. The following is a portion of the AAW newsletter sent earlier this month:
    The AAW was one of eleven arts organizations in the Twin Cities recently awarded grants for projects to make the arts more accessible to people with disabilities. The American Association of Woodturners received $15,000 to create curriculum materials and guidelines for instructors to use in assisting blind and low vision community members to discover the craft of woodturning. Under the leadership of Linda Ferber, AAW Program Director, the project will also develop resources and techniques to enable current woodturners experiencing vision loss to remain involved with their woodturning activities. The project will include research, consultation, instructor training, and a pilot class to test and refine the curriculum. When completed in early 2013, the curriculum materials will be available digitally to all of our members and local chapters at no cost.
    Dennis DeVendra - The Blind Woodturner
    www.blindwoodturner.com

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Location
    St. Charles MO
    Posts
    1

    Thumbs up Training for assisting blind and low vision members

    Our club, Woodturners of St. Louis has a member who is blind so I was drawn to your article in the AAW newsletter that was just released. It is great to see that the AAW is supportive of training for assisting blind and low vision community members discover woodturning.

    He has demonstrated turning at our club and others in the region. He recently participated in a class taught by Trent Bosch on turning hollow vessels and was featured in our November newsletter. The article includes a quote from Trent.
    http://www.stlturners.org/newsletter.htm

    Having a blind demonstrator at the national symposium would be both instructional (how to use all your senses, organization at the lathe,) and inspirational to both sited and blind members of the AAW. It could also be a forum for sharing ideas, experiences, and accomplishments.

    We wish you and the AAW the best in developing this program. If our club can assist, please let me know.


    www.stlturners.org/index.htm

  3. #3

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by CW Sapp View Post
    Our club, Woodturners of St. Louis has a member who is blind so I was drawn to your article in the AAW newsletter that was just released. It is great to see that the AAW is supportive of training for assisting blind and low vision community members discover woodturning.

    He has demonstrated turning at our club and others in the region. He recently participated in a class taught by Trent Bosch on turning hollow vessels and was featured in our November newsletter. The article includes a quote from Trent.
    http://www.stlturners.org/newsletter.htm

    Having a blind demonstrator at the national symposium would be both instructional (how to use all your senses, organization at the lathe,) and inspirational to both sited and blind members of the AAW. It could also be a forum for sharing ideas, experiences, and accomplishments.

    We wish you and the AAW the best in developing this program. If our club can assist, please let me know.


    www.stlturners.org/index.htm
    It sounds like I will be participating in a discussion about woodturning and accessibility at the 2013 symposium I would be interested in what people would want to hear about accessibility and woodturning.
    Dennis DeVendra - The Blind Woodturner
    www.blindwoodturner.com

  4. #4

    Default

    [QUOTE=Dennis DeVendra;88292]

    This weekend I travel to St Paul MN, the home of the AAW headquarters to participate in the third and last leg of the Accessible Lathe program setup. I will be working with Jim Sanarud and other turners to run a class for 5 blind woodturning students. We will use this time to validate the instructional materials and to have some fun. The class will last for two days. After that we will spend the third day reviewing and updating our materials.

    In June I will join Andi Sullivan and two turners who are in wheelchairs to talk about turning for people with disabilities. We will be talking about the Accessible Lathe program and other related topics. We all will have a chance to demonstrate our woodturning skills as well.

    I have submitted a journal article that will describe the Accessible Lathe program and the steps in the process we had gone through. Stay tuned for more information.
    Last edited by Dennis DeVendra; 01-17-2013 at 06:44 PM.
    Dennis DeVendra - The Blind Woodturner
    www.blindwoodturner.com

  5. #5

    Default

    Hi, I am very interested in this accessible turning program. I am fully blind and want to learn how to wood turn. I am wondering if this is only going to be available to people living in the USA, and do i have to be a member of the aaw not the forums. Also when does it look like this will be finished, I thought i read some where june time. Thanks.

  6. #6

    Default materials for accessible lathe program

    Hello - I cannot answer all your questions now. I will provide a couple pieces of information and find out more this week.

    First the materials are designed to help an experienced turner work with a turner who is blind. Many of the basic techniques for turning are not addressed in the program.

    To answer one of your questions. The materials should be available to anyone around the world.

    As far as having materials for only AAW members, I do not think it is limited, but I need to find this out.

    Finally, the materials should be up on the website in the next month or so. With the crunch of the AAW symposium, the materials may take a backseat until the first part of July. I have an article published in the AAW Journal this month describing the program. The Journal is only available to members.

    More to come. There may be a turner or a club full of turners near where you live to provide help and guidance. This would be the best, but not the only way, to get started.

    Good luck and I will provide more in the next few days.

    Quote Originally Posted by grant marshall View Post
    Hi, I am very interested in this accessible turning program. I am fully blind and want to learn how to wood turn. I am wondering if this is only going to be available to people living in the USA, and do i have to be a member of the aaw not the forums. Also when does it look like this will be finished, I thought i read some where june time. Thanks.
    Dennis DeVendra - The Blind Woodturner
    www.blindwoodturner.com

  7. #7

    Default accessible lathe program

    I am very interested in this program. I have a 17 year old grandson that is blind in one eye and very visually impaired in the other. The last two years I have worked with him do the first two 4-H woodworking programs. I would like to work with him on this program.

  8. #8

    Default access for turning

    That sounds great. I love turning. This is a great outlet for bothartistic and craft. You can check out my webside for videos and other information. www.blindwoodturner.com
    Dennis DeVendra - The Blind Woodturner
    www.blindwoodturner.com

  9. #9

    Default

    That sounds great. I find turning is a great outlet for my artistic and craft side. You can check out my website for pictures and videos of my work. I love it. Stay tuned for the manual and videos from the AAW. Let me know how it works for you. Any updates and advise would be appreciated.
    Quote Originally Posted by Rod Smith View Post
    I am very interested in this program. I have a 17 year old grandson that is blind in one eye and very visually impaired in the other. The last two years I have worked with him do the first two 4-H woodworking programs. I would like to work with him on this program.
    Dennis DeVendra - The Blind Woodturner
    www.blindwoodturner.com

  10. #10

    Default The 2013 Symposium

    The 2013 symposium was something to behold. Imagine over a thousand people sharing the love and passion of woodturning, all in one spot. Between the demonstrations, vendor floor, and many friends to catch up with, it was all good. I was able to attend sessions on creating lamp shades, hollow forms, offset platters, little drunken boxes, natural burl bowls, and others so many others. The vendor floor was filled with current and new products. The people at Tormek were kind enough to provide me with a sharpening system to use during my demonstration on Sunday.

    As part of the symposium rotations, I participated in a panel discussion on turning with challenges. There were 2 blind turners and 2 turners in wheel chairs. We talked about our stories of getting started with turning. Then we talked about challenges and how we overcame those challenges. After the panel discussion we gathered over in the youth turning area to have the visiting guest from the lighthouse for the blind try their hand at turning a pen. All was good.

    I had many people approach me about their experiences with working with a potential turner who was blind. We exchanged ideas and stories.

    On Sunday I needed to show my stuff. I turned a lidded box in the Robust lathe booth. Thanks to the team at Robust for providing me with a forum to show my stuff. I was told we had a little bit of an audience. Then there was Bob Rosand, a long time mentor for me, who was enjoying harassing me during the demo. He did a great job breaking the tension and making me feel like I was one of the turners.

    I was told that the full accessible lathe program will be available later on this summer. Remember the program is targeted to experienced turners who would like to work with a turner who is blind. It is not a course in turning.
    Also it is not intended to be used directly by a person who is blind. The main focus is to identify key modifications and techniques to provide a person who is blind with the tools to turn.

    What a great time I had in Tampa. . Maybe just maybe I will be back next year in Arizona.

    A special thanks to Ron Cinquanti, Dawn Pietry, and Rudy Lopez for providing me assistance throughout the entire symposium. They were able to describe the demonstrations, help me from session to session, and take me anywhere I needed to go. What a great time.
    Dennis DeVendra - The Blind Woodturner
    www.blindwoodturner.com

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •