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Common sense

Discussion in 'Woodturning Health & Safety' started by Emiliano Achaval, Mar 18, 2019.

  1. Emiliano Achaval

    Emiliano Achaval Administrator Staff Member

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    I was giving a lesson yesterday to a beginner. I thought I had covered most safety topics. Then I noticed when he had the blank on the chuck, after finishing the tenon, he was standing right in the line of fire and was reaching for the on switch. I told him, well, I yelled at him, No!! I realized that what it is second nature for someone that has been turning for a while it is not so clear for someone just starting. He jokingly said that had the blank flown off the lathe and hit him, would have been a great lesson. I had to agree, that was probably how I learned not to stand there...
    He was also amazed at how many things you check before you even turn on the lathe...
     
  2. John Torchick

    John Torchick

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    Good advice. I always stand off to the side when I chuck an irregular piece of wood in the lathe. Lyle Jamieson advocates a switch on the headstock end- you can shut off the lathe and slow the lathe at the same time. Had a piece come off at low speed but didn't have a chance to slow the piece. Bounced off the wall while watching it spin and scrape my elbow.
     
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  3. Bob Sheppard

    Bob Sheppard

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    It took me a long time, but I've learned to listen to those voices in my head saying "Stop". I'll step away, and reassess what I'm doing, And usually save myself some aggravation, or injury.
     
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  4. Emiliano Achaval

    Emiliano Achaval Administrator Staff Member

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    I always say that it's very important to listen to your gut feeling, inner voice, whatever it is that warns you about something dangerous.
     
  5. Bruce Perry

    Bruce Perry

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    The first thing I've been doing in my beginner level classes is getting everyone to put a name tag on their right shoulder, where I can see them. We have five or six beginners at the same time. Some day I'll take the Dale Carnegie course and my memory will become useful. (I hope)

    Then we spend the next several minutes, me apologizing because I'm lousy with remembering names, and pointing out that if they hear their own name loudly it means to stop, whatever they are doing.

    Five or six people rounding spindles makes a great deal of noise, and sometimes "loudly" means what I was taught in my drill Sargent days (ROTC 52 years back) to call "command voice". You have to penetrate both the fog of noise and the intense concentration a new turner almost always has going on, so there is no way around being loud in that circumstance.

    There always seems to be someone who, having been shown the easy and safe way to do something simple, misses some detail and is about to throw a big splinter, or the whole chunk of wood, at themselves or someone else.

    This couple of minutes at the beginning of classes has kept my injury rate at 0, the only score worth having.

    I've yet to have a student offended by this, most of us like not to bleed.
     
    Last edited: Mar 4, 2020
  6. John Torchick

    John Torchick

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    Nothing wrong with having the name tags. I couldn't remember anything until I took the Sam Carnegie course.
     
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  7. hockenbery

    hockenbery AAW Advisor Staff Member

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    Had some similar experiences to those recounted by @Bruce Perry.
    when we did kids classes we would put the names in big letters on their face shields - so that they could get the one adjusted for their head.

    It does not take too many classes to realize that some students don’t retain much of what was previously covered.
    it’s just that so often they are flooded with new things that they have no previous experience to build on.
    When everything is new it is so important not to tell them too much.

    I had the privilege of working with a dozen big name instructors we brought into Maryland hall and few in my shop in Florida. Almost every 5 day “advanced” class began with turning a simple bowl. This give the instructor and the assistant time to evaluate each student’s level, fine tune basic techniques, get their tools sharpened properly and show them how to sharpen to get the same results. By the start of day 2 everyone has had a successful bowl under their belt and they have a vocabulary and skill set to build on during the rest of the week.
     
  8. Matthew Ferriter

    Matthew Ferriter

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    I got into the habit while working for years with a small Sherline lathe of not only shutting off the power, but also reducing the speed to its lowest setting when moving things around. That way there are no fewer surprises when turning it on, possibly a few days later.
     
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