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NRS vs stock scraper

Discussion in 'Getting Started' started by Stephen Schmidt, Nov 11, 2020.

  1. Stephen Schmidt

    Stephen Schmidt

    Joined:
    Oct 11, 2020
    Messages:
    3
    Location (City & State):
    Youngsville, NC
    If one has left-side curved, square-nose and round-nose negative-rake scrapers that can be used on the tool rest or as a shear-scraper, what is the utility of also having the related stock scraper? They seem redundant and more difficult to use. Does one really need both? Asking for opinions. Thanks Steve
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Nov 12, 2020
  2. brian horais

    brian horais

    Joined:
    Dec 20, 2014
    Messages:
    109
    Location (City & State):
    Knoxville, TN
    Home Page:
    Great question Stephen. I have to admit that ever since I started using negative rake scrapers (NRS), I seldom use my old traditional scrapers. The negative rake scraper is much more forgiving and yields great results for achieving a near-final surface quality. As with all tools, the secret is keeping the tool sharp. I have my sharpening wheel set up just behind me when I am turning so I can frequently touch up the edge of my tools. The sharpening surface of my NRS is the same angle as my roughing gouge, so I usually have the sharpening ramp set up for the correct angle.
     
  3. robo hippy

    robo hippy

    Joined:
    Aug 14, 2007
    Messages:
    3,066
    Location (City & State):
    Eugene, OR
    Well, I can't turn bowls without my standard scrapers. Look up my videos, 'Scary Scrapers' and 'Shear Scraping'. For me, the scraper is the most efficient tool for heavy duty stock removal. I also prefer a scraper with a burnished burr for my shear scraping. Part of that preference may be because I don't use the swept back grind gouges any more after discovering the 40/40 grind. I do not think the NRS makes a good shear scraper, unless you are using a burnished burr. I do prefer the burnished burr on my shear scrapers as well. The grinder burr may cut for a short while, but just like when using the NRS for clean up duty, it is gone in seconds. The NRS does excel in end grain turnings. It works very well sweeping across the bottom of a bowl for clean up, just like a standard scraper. It does not do as well going up the sides of a bowl, but that depends a lot on the wood. Harder woods, yes, softer woods, no. I haven't done a NRS video quite yet...

    robo hippy
     
    Tim Tucker likes this.
  4. brian horais

    brian horais

    Joined:
    Dec 20, 2014
    Messages:
    109
    Location (City & State):
    Knoxville, TN
    Home Page:
    I agree with Robo that the NRS is primarily for clean up duty and that it works best on end grain.
     

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