• We just finished a major forum upgrade. Please check out the "Whats New and Help" Thread at https://aawforum.org/community/index.php?threads/forum-upgrade-whats-new-and-help-march-2021.17436/ If you are having problems using the forums, please clear your browser cache and that should clear up any issues. Otherwise post in the Help Thread or email us at forum_moderator@aawforum.org. Hope you enjoy the refreshed site!
  • 3/30/21 - We finished what was hopefully the last part of the forum upgrade we started earlier this month, the rebuilding of all of the permissions. In our testing everything seems to be working correctly but if you have any problems please post in the "Forum Technical Support" forum and we will take a look at it. You will also see a few changes with the main forum index. We have moved the AAW Member Forums to their own group and the Marketplace Forums to their own group. This simplified the permissions configuration for the forums and hopefully it will make the forums a little easier to naviagate. Thanks!
  • Gallery Images: Title and Description Required

    Please read the new sticky announcement HERE for full details.

  • Welcome new registering member. Your username must be your real First and Last name (for example: John Doe). "Screen names" and "handles" are not allowed and your registration will be deleted if you don't use your real name. Also, do not use all caps nor all lower case.

Spindle thread

Joined
Jan 14, 2020
Messages
112
Likes
27
Location
Austin, TX
Hi, I want/ed to build a ... thing that screwed into my faceplate. My spindle is 1-1/4 x 8tpi. I basically want to build a spindle that I can attach to a rotisserie motor so I can epoxy finish a vase. (I can elaborate if requested).
So I went to the specialty hardware store and looked at all the threaded things I could find, pvc, pipe, hose and a) the threads that came close we 1" or 3/4". And b) none of the threads matched.
So, question, is there anything that is commonly available that would match my thread spindle? And if, as I suspected, not, do you think I could find a die that I could use to thread a dowel for the job?
Thanks
R
 
Joined
Jan 14, 2020
Messages
112
Likes
27
Location
Austin, TX
Hi Larry,
You sure about that 7tpi? mines a laguna and this is from their website

Spindle Size: 1¼” X 8 TPI RH

I feel like I"ve only every seen 1-1/4 x 8 tpi mentioned.
R
 
Joined
Jul 18, 2018
Messages
299
Likes
188
Location
Baltimore, MD
I believe he needs a tap to make male threads. I have a Beall tap for female 1 1/4” threads. Is there a tap for male 1 1/4” threads by 8TPI?
 

hockenbery

AAW Advisor
Staff member
Beta Tester
Joined
Apr 27, 2004
Messages
6,850
Likes
2,718
Location
Lakeland, Florida
Website
www.hockenberywoodturning.com
question, is there anything that is commonly available that would match my thread spindle?
Use your face plate.
I have cut threads on several fixtures using a faceplate.
Cut a tenon the size of the inside opening plus an 1/8 for the threads,
Put a very slight champhor on the end.
Clamp it in a Vice and start screwing the face plate on until it doesn’t go then unscrew.
Keep repeating - it is tedious but each on advances the thread a quarter turn or so.
A 10 “ face plate make the thread cutting easier. If you don’t have a large faceplate screw a short 2x4 to the faceplate to make handles with some mechanical advantage.

One fixture I made this way was a vacuum holder to fit in the banjo.
I used Purple Heart Purple Heart. Turned one end to fit in the banjo, one end to thread, drilled a vertical hole, Drilled a tight cross hole for a male vacuum coupling. Put thick C A on the coupling threads an drove it in with a hammer. Clamped the fixture in the banjo and cut the threads. Now I can mount vacuum chucks on the top of my banjo to hold pieces for carving etc.
 
Joined
Sep 4, 2013
Messages
71
Likes
18
Location
Kennedale Texas
Go online, fastenal has the threads you want in both bolts and nuts. I bought some from a local store that specializes in fasteners and they work fine
 
Joined
Aug 14, 2007
Messages
3,272
Likes
993
Location
Eugene, OR
Yes, you can order the 1 1/4 by 8 tpi nuts and bolts, but they are not standard in any store. I have always wondered why lathes use the 1 1/4 by 8 when the industry standard is 1 1/4 by 7.....

robo hippy
 

john lucas

AAW Forum Expert
Joined
Apr 26, 2004
Messages
7,609
Likes
2,208
Location
Cookeville TN USA
1 1/4x8 is the thread size for bolts that are extra strong. That's why they aren't 7TPI so you won't use the wrong bolt and nut that is weaker. Now why lathe manufacturers picked that size I don't know. You can get the bolts and all thread in 1 1/4x8 from Fastenal but they are expensive. Last time I bought some a 1"x8 nut was $1. I bought several to make faceplates for friends. I asked if he could get 1 1/4x8 and he said sure so I told him to get me a dozen. I did not ask the price thinking they would be just a little more expensive. They were $5 each. Ouch. That was many years ago.
 

john lucas

AAW Forum Expert
Joined
Apr 26, 2004
Messages
7,609
Likes
2,208
Location
Cookeville TN USA
I don't know why lathe manufacturers picked 1 1/4x8. 1 1/4"x8 is a nut designed for extra strength situations. That way you wont mistakenly use a 7TPI nut and bolt in the same situation. It's a safety thing. I found this out when I was ordering some 1"x8 nuts to make faceplates for a friend. They were $1 each. I asked if he could get 1 1/4"x8 nuts and he said he could. I didn't ask the price thinking they would only be a little more. I ordered a dozen. They were $5 each. Ouch. That's when I found out why they were different thread sizes than the standard 1 1/4x7. You can get taps and dyes from https://www.mscdirect.com/ The taps aren't too bad. The dyes are quite expensive. As Al said if you just want to tap wood instead of metal just buy the Beale taps. They are quite reasonable.
 
Joined
Jul 19, 2018
Messages
825
Likes
614
Location
Ponsford, MN
101_1231.JPG This is a unit that I made using a rotisserie motor and it is similar to 2 others that I made using heavier duty gear motors. The rotisserie motor is based on a small synchronous clock motor so I doubt that it would be able to support a heavy chuck and turning. The 3 units I made all have a shaft added that will accept a 1/2" dowel or rod. I have several different fixtures that I can mount including an aluminum 1"-8 spindle, several male and female thread adapters as shown and a jerry rigged two jaw recess chuck.
For the steel and aluminum parts I have the advantage of owning a metal lathe also but for you I think someone already mentioned seeing if there are any "home shop machinists" in your area
101_1261.JPG
 
Last edited:

John Jordan

AAW Advisor
Joined
Jun 24, 2008
Messages
463
Likes
323
Location
Cane Ridge (Nashville), TN
Website
www.johnjordanwoodturning.com
What happened was General machinery picked 1-1/4" for their lathe, who knows why. It was the only lathe with that size spindle, and it was the state of the art, desired lathe at the time. Woodfast came along and I suspect Craft Supplies made the decision to make it the same as General so people could use their general faceplates (before chucks). Basically, every other lathe pretty much followed suit and it became the defacto standard. Nothing superior about it. I'll ask Brent why that's what he chose for the Robust, but I know the answer. LOL Rest of the turning world (and Oneway) uses M33.

John
 
Joined
Jul 20, 2020
Messages
17
Likes
6
Location
Babylon, NY
At least some of the J-Line (Brodhead - Garret) lathes had 1 1/16" x 8 tpi spindles. Try to find an adapter for that! I guess it was the Craftsman theory of making oddball stuff so you had to buy the accessories from them.
 
Joined
May 8, 2019
Messages
182
Likes
60
Location
Funen, Denmark
Here in Denmark, the metric system arrived in 1868, became law in 1909 and was fully implemented around WW1.
Yet if I go to the hardware store and ask for a certain metric dimension of wood, the guy will answer "sure, 4 by 4, this way".
Old habits... :)
 
Joined
Jul 19, 2018
Messages
825
Likes
614
Location
Ponsford, MN
Here in Denmark, the metric system arrived in 1868, became law in 1909 and was fully implemented around WW1.
Yet if I go to the hardware store and ask for a certain metric dimension of wood, the guy will answer "sure, 4 by 4, this way".
Old habits... :)
Some how it seams kind odd to ask for a 100 x 100.
The US would have beat you to it if Thomas Jefferson had his way, but at least our money is metric as in 100 cents (centi) to the dollar.
 
Joined
Jan 31, 2020
Messages
178
Likes
121
Location
Hoschton, GA
The machinist world has converted inches into metric, sort of. 1/10th and 1/1000's of an inch. Fractional measurements still cause me to break out a pencil occasionally.

I'll be the 1st to admit that the metric system makes a lot more sense than the U.S. system. The metric system is based on the cubic volume of water whereas the U.S. system is based on the length of some ancient King's reach.
 

Bill Boehme

Administrator
Staff member
Beta Tester
Joined
Jan 27, 2005
Messages
11,634
Likes
3,479
Location
Dalworthington Gardens, TX
Website
pbase.com
Actually, we have officially been on the metric system for more than 50 years. The military uses the metric system and all government contracts must use the metric system.

There are lots of things in the world that aren't metric such as keeping time, measuring angles in degrees, the number of days in a week, and the number of months in a year.
 
Joined
Sep 8, 2016
Messages
105
Likes
76
Location
Bonney lake, Washington
I am holding in my hand a 1-1/4 x 8 nut.
the bag the nut came in says 1-1/4 x 8 A194 2H Heavy Hex nut
plain...

I got them from Fastenal.....they may have to order them....

I think they cost about $4.00 each...I bought 5.... see below.

The bag also says FMW fasteners.....that is the company that makes them

Fastenal has what you need..

I use them for jam chucks . I screw them right on....the spindle.
i epoxy the nut to the back of a waste block.

I have no idea how you are to adapt for a rotisserie........but they do
fit on my Laguna 18/36 spindle.
 
Last edited:
Joined
Dec 12, 2012
Messages
24
Likes
1
Location
Australia
For many years the standard spindle thread in Australia was one inch x 10. Now so many imports have changed the scene to various metric threads. But they are mainly M30 or M33
 
Top