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Woodturning books.

Discussion in 'Woodturning Discussion Forum' started by Glenn Lefley, Sep 12, 2020.

  1. Glenn Lefley

    Glenn Lefley

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    If you had to choose a couple of books in your woodturning collection, which ones would you pass on down to your grand kid interested in woodturning, finishing etc.
     
    Dennis Weiner likes this.
  2. Emiliano Achaval

    Emiliano Achaval Administrator Staff Member

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    I have a lot of them. The nicest one is David Ellsworth's hardcover limited edition, signed by him; I prize that a lot. All the books from Richard Raffan have a place of honor too. The Hawaiian Calabash by Irving Jenkins is probably the one that my kids will fight for someday. Non-turning related but the books about trees and plants in Hawaii, I have them all, a lot of them. I have to walk over to my library and take a look, I might add a few later.
     
  3. Tim Connell

    Tim Connell

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    Bob Flexner for wood finishing.

    Richard Raffan - any/all of them, but his one on bowl design is a must have, also discusses and illustrates how to cut blanks.

    Doc Green, Fixtures and Chucks for Woodturning.

    Also, a book or two on tree ID for your area are a must have.
     
  4. john lucas

    john lucas AAW Forum Expert

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    Yea Bob Flexners.book for sure. No one else really talks about finishing much. Lots of.great books on turning. Raffens are.the best.
     
  5. Bill Blasic

    Bill Blasic

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    Christian Radcliff likes this.
  6. Roger Wiegand

    Roger Wiegand

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    Bruce Hoadley's Understanding Wood; when you have a clear understanding of the material much of what people tell you you should do in working with it makes much more sense. Also his Identifying Wood is the easiest to use guide I know of for answering the 'What wood is this?' question.

    Any and all of the Raffan books.
     
  7. Don Wattenhofer

    Don Wattenhofer

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    Totally agree every one should read "Understanding Wood", the picture on the jacket is something every woodturner or wood worker should look at and study.
     
    Christian Radcliff likes this.
  8. Karl Best

    Karl Best

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    Raffan's The Art of Turned Bowls, especially ch.3 on forms, has been the most valuable to me.
     
  9. Dennis Weiner

    Dennis Weiner

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    I own most of the books mentioned above and would recommend them All to new Woodturners. I found Raffan’s publications very personable and relatable. I think if you had to sum up Raffan’s books in one word, for me the word is “Motivational”.

    The book that helped me break through the beginner’s barrier was “Shapes for Woodturners” by David Walton. This dry and unglamorous publication provided Me with what I wanted and did not want to turn. The graphic representation Of each piece was extremely helpful in storyboarding pieces while I learned the subtleties of form design.
     
    Last edited: Sep 13, 2020
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  10. RichColvin

    RichColvin

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    Frank Knox’s Ornamental Turnery - A Practical and Historical Approach to a Centuries-Old Craft. Best book to start learn about ornamental turning.
     
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  11. Bob Sheppard

    Bob Sheppard

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    I have that book. I met him at the NY Woodturning group that used to meet at the YWCA in Manhattan. He did some beautiful pieces.
     
  12. JeffSmith

    JeffSmith

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    In addition to Raffan’s books - particularly the Art of the Bowl, I pull out a copy of 500 Wood Bowls for inspiration when needed - hard to find these days. Flexner’s book on finishing is always in the shop.
     
  13. Hugh

    Hugh

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    Three books that all woodturners should have:
    Richard Raffan's Woodturning book - basic woodturning in a very readable book.
    Richard Raffan's - Art of the Wooden Bowl.......a bit past the basic book.....but all woodturners should have this book.
    David Ellsworth book on Woodturning......just another book that all should own.....and pull out on occasion.
    OK - I am off my soap box for now.
     
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  14. Paul M. Kaplowitz

    Paul M. Kaplowitz

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    The book that helped me the most when I started 30 years ago was "Woodturning, A Foundation Course" by Keith Rowley. The most beautiful book I have is " Woodturning with Ray Allen.
     
  15. Dennis J Gooding

    Dennis J Gooding

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    In addition to Raffan's books, I would recomend John Hunnex's book, "Wood Turning--A Source Book of Shapes". It is an inspirational source for the new new turner.
     
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  16. Emiliano Achaval

    Emiliano Achaval Administrator Staff Member

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    Nobody has mentioned a classic, F. Frank woodturning book. The First edition was around 1954. I was flipping thru it today, made me laugh. He says that professionals do not wear eye protection because they deflect the chips with their cupped hand. He also says that he doesn't worry about dust, he knows where is coming from, and he can avoid it, and or redirect it!! He then says he has gotten fat on dust actually, nothing to worry about! Not sure I can recommend Mr. Frank anymore after reading part of his book. When I first read it, I did not know any better, so it did not struck me as odd or funny, like now. Another great book is To turn the perfect wooden bowl, the lifelong quest of Bob Stocksdale. Highly recommended!
     
  17. Mark Jundanian

    Mark Jundanian

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    Not necessarily a book for those just starting out, but for someone with a few pieces behind them: "The Creative Woodturner", by Terry Martin.
     
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  18. odie

    odie

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    Looks like the original Raffan book is mentioned more than any other. I just checked mine: 2nd printing in 1986.....close to the time I purchased it. I had a couple of other older turning books, that have been lost.....one that was really old. Doesn't matter, because if you want to pass something to your grand kid, the Raffan book would be the best of those I've used. Good illustrations, and easy to read/comprehend.

    I expect the Raffan book will be around for a long time to come.....

    -----odie-----
     
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  19. John Tisdale

    John Tisdale

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  20. Adam Cottrill

    Adam Cottrill

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    I agree with every recommendation so far, especially anything by Richard Raffan or David Ellsworth. If your young turner is interested in making boxes I would add Chris Stott's "Turned Boxes - 50 Designs". It is excellent and has something for almost every skill level.
     
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