• May Turning Challenge -- Turn Something with Metal!

    Click HERE for further details.
  • April Turning Challenge Winner!
    Congratulations to Bruce Kerns, the winner of the April Turning Challenge, Turn an Easter Egg
    CLICK HERE to see the final voting results.
  • Turning of the Week -- May 16, 2022

    Congratulations to Jeff Jackson for Spalted Myrtle Urn being selected as this weeks TOTW!

    CLICK HERE for all the details.

  • Welcome new registering member. Your username must be your real First and Last name (for example: John Doe). "Screen names" and "handles" are not allowed and your registration will be deleted if you don't use your real name. Also, do not use all caps nor all lower case.

6-inch grinder limitations

Joined
Dec 10, 2021
Messages
6
Likes
6
Location
New Paltz, NY
The bowl gouge that I use most frequently has about a 46-degree fingernail grind. My 6-inch grinder and Wolverine jig work OK to keep it sharp. However, I would like to change to something more like a 55-degree grind. When I tried to reshape the gouge, I found that there was no way to get the tool safely in contact with the wheel without getting it dangerously low on the wheel. I tried different jig settings but couldn't figure it out. I considered lowering the grinder closer to the jig, but it is about as low as it can go. Am I running into a limitation of a 6-inch wheel? It seems like an 8-inch wheel would offer a lot more flexibility, but I thought I'd ask before puling the trigger.
 
Joined
Nov 15, 2020
Messages
175
Likes
102
Location
Huntington, VT
I use a 6" grinder with a Wolverine jig to grind a wide range of angles without difficulty. My Ellsworth gouge has a about a 55* nose bevel. I would have to see what the height is from the wheel centerline down to the Wolverine guide, but I originally set it up so the pivot point for the jig is 4" below center as per Ellsworth's specs. You may need to adjust the pivot point horizontally to get the nose of the gouge higher on the wheel. If using the Varigrind play with the pivot point location and the Varigrind angle to get the angles on nose and wings correct. If you are using the platform maybe the support needs to be higher or lower. Try drawing it out on paper. You are right to be concerned about being too low on the wheel. I once had a tool "snap through" which caused me the utmost damned astonishment.
 

Dennis J Gooding

Beta Tester
Beta Tester
Joined
Apr 10, 2010
Messages
737
Likes
625
Location
Grants Pass, Oregon
The bowl gouge that I use most frequently has about a 46-degree fingernail grind. My 6-inch grinder and Wolverine jig work OK to keep it sharp. However, I would like to change to something more like a 55-degree grind. When I tried to reshape the gouge, I found that there was no way to get the tool safely in contact with the wheel without getting it dangerously low on the wheel. I tried different jig settings but couldn't figure it out. I considered lowering the grinder closer to the jig, but it is about as low as it can go. Am I running into a limitation of a 6-inch wheel? It seems like an 8-inch wheel would offer a lot more flexibility, but I thought I'd ask before puling the trigger.
What amount of gouge protrusion from the jig are you using? What arm angle setting?
 

Bill Boehme

Administrator
Staff member
Beta Tester
TOTW Team
Joined
Jan 27, 2005
Messages
12,164
Likes
4,073
Location
Dalworthington Gardens, TX
Website
pbase.com
The bowl gouge that I use most frequently has about a 46-degree fingernail grind. My 6-inch grinder and Wolverine jig work OK to keep it sharp. However, I would like to change to something more like a 55-degree grind. When I tried to reshape the gouge, I found that there was no way to get the tool safely in contact with the wheel without getting it dangerously low on the wheel. I tried different jig settings but couldn't figure it out. I considered lowering the grinder closer to the jig, but it is about as low as it can go. Am I running into a limitation of a 6-inch wheel? It seems like an 8-inch wheel would offer a lot more flexibility, but I thought I'd ask before puling the trigger.

From your description, it sounds to me like you are using the long arm of the Wolverine fixture to hold the gouge rather than putting the gouge in a Varigrind jig. If that is the case, your concern is definitely valid especially for a matrix wheel (aluminum oxide or silicon carbide) if you apply any downward pressure because the wheel will tend to be grabby as the nose angle increases past 60°. If the gouge gets jammed into the wheel, it could cause the wheel to shatter. It would be far better to use a jig such as the Varigrind to hold the gouge.

Raising or lowering the grinder won't help the situation.
 

john lucas

AAW Forum Expert
TOTW Team
Joined
Apr 26, 2004
Messages
7,859
Likes
2,595
Location
Cookeville, TN
Ditto what Bill said. I used the wolverine jig in my Oneway V arm with a 6" grinder for years.
 

hockenbery

Forum MVP
Beta Tester
TOTW Team
Joined
Apr 27, 2004
Messages
7,314
Likes
3,350
Location
Lakeland, Florida
Website
www.hockenberywoodturning.com
Last edited:
Joined
Dec 10, 2021
Messages
6
Likes
6
Location
New Paltz, NY
Thanks for all the responses. I am using the Varigrind accessory, seated into the long arm of the Wolverine jig. I'll take some photos of the setup this weekend and share them here.
 

Bill Boehme

Administrator
Staff member
Beta Tester
TOTW Team
Joined
Jan 27, 2005
Messages
12,164
Likes
4,073
Location
Dalworthington Gardens, TX
Website
pbase.com
If the wheels on your grinder are out of round or have any side-to-side wobble it will cause the grinder to have extreme vibration which will make it nearly impossible to get a truly sharp edge. That could also exacerbate the possibility of the gouge jamming into the wheel and shattering it.
 
Joined
Dec 10, 2021
Messages
6
Likes
6
Location
New Paltz, NY
Update to close the loop on this thread:

I figured out that the problem was my grinder. The Craftsman grinder that I was using has a base that extends out under the grinding wheels. That meant that I had to build a platform for the grinder/jig assembly that put the jig under the base of the grinder and too far away from the wheel. The distance, coupled with the small diameter of the wheels, meant that I could only use the grinder in limited ways before the angle of the tool on the wheel became a problem. I replaced it with a Rikon 8" grinder and I'm much happier. All my tools are sharp and shaped how I wanted them. Thanks for the tips.
 
Top