• Turning of the Week -- November 29, 2021

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  • November Turning Challenge Winner!

    Congratulations to Bernie Hrytzak for his snowmen tree ornaments being voted as the winner of the November Challenge CLICK HERE to see the voting results.

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Glynn Cavin

Joined
Nov 11, 2021
Messages
3
Likes
1
Location
Auburn, AL
Good morning everyone. Although I have been doing hobby woodwork most of my life (I'm 71) this is my first adventure into turning. I live in Auburn, AL, work at the University, and I'm retired military.

I have been making cutting boards and various other items (some using my CNC router) but have not had the ability to go "round". I would like to start with things like pens, items with turned handles, candle holders, etc. I don't anticipate doing large bowls until I have some experience. I have a LOT to learn and look forward to advice from you experienced members. After a lot of research, and a lot of going back and forth, I have decided to get the Laguna REVO 12/16, with the stand, mobility kit, and bed extension. I hope that will be a good choice for a newbe.

One thing I've discovered is just as with so many other woodworking tools, there is a bewildering variety of accessories - all promising to be just what the turner needs (LOL). I would welcome any advice on all the accessories to get: for example the Axminster AK100 seems to get high praises - is it a good choice for a new turner and for this machine? Are there competitors that might be as good or nearly as good but lower price? What about the turning tools? Acme Tools offers a nice 6 piece HSS set from Penn State. Is this a good starter set - not too expensive, but not junk either? Or should I bite the bullet and go ahead and get carbide tools? Is anyone using the Ultra-Sheer pen mandrel - if so what is you advice? If there are other tools that I should be considering, please let me know.

I'm looking forward to learning from this forum.
Glynn
 
Joined
Feb 6, 2010
Messages
2,087
Likes
977
Location
Brandon, MS
Welcome aboard. I cannot advise on the tools you have only tell you what I use and why.
I actually started with a mini set of Benjamin's Best, but quickly outgrew that. A set is not needed and I would suggest getting bowl gouge, parting tool, spindle gouge. Although I do have other tools these do maybe 80-90 % of the work. My choice for gouges is Thompson but again I do have others including Hunter carbides.
Chuck I use are all Super Nova 2. Had a Penn State Barracuda but I found it ti slip. The SN2 has a full range of jaws and if tenon is cut properly will work as good as any other chuck. They are cheaper than most . They have a new one called Super Nova 2 Pro Tek at 199 and looks like it replaces the SN2. The new one uses the same screw direction as all other chucks but SN2 tightens in opposite direction.
No matter what if you can buy at least better tools to start with
 
Joined
Feb 26, 2019
Messages
715
Likes
441
Location
Lebanon, Missouri
Welcome Glynn. The Laguna lathe should serve you well.

Yes, not only is the accessory availability bewildering, there are several or many ways of doing the same thing, depending on who you talk to. Be sure to take advantage of all the article and video resources the AAW has available, they are all safety approved, unlike other resources. Find an AAW chapter as close as possible and visit them - many have mentor programs.

I have recently completed a beginner list of tools for our local chapter (it is only my opinion and other's opinions could be very different). Initially I recommend best value tools, as most folks have a limited budget. They function very well at a reasonable or even low price vs alternatives, especially cutting tools. I like Penn State Ind, but their are some other compatible brands.

Carbide tools - they offer more "instant gratification" and cheaper to get started, since you can use a diamond hone to freshen edges and dont need a grinder and jig. The down side is surface finish (lot more sanding) and you learn to use scraping vs floating the bevel.

If interested in the tools list send me a message in "conversations". It's an excel file I can't attach in this forum and is not formatted to just paste here.
 

Bill Boehme

Administrator
Staff member
Beta Tester
Joined
Jan 27, 2005
Messages
11,870
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3,700
Location
Dalworthington Gardens, TX
Website
pbase.com
Good morning everyone. Although I have been doing hobby woodwork most of my life (I'm 71) this is my first adventure into turning. I live in Auburn, AL, work at the University, and I'm retired military.

I have been making cutting boards and various other items (some using my CNC router) but have not had the ability to go "round". I would like to start with things like pens, items with turned handles, candle holders, etc. I don't anticipate doing large bowls until I have some experience. I have a LOT to learn and look forward to advice from you experienced members. After a lot of research, and a lot of going back and forth, I have decided to get the Laguna REVO 12/16, with the stand, mobility kit, and bed extension. I hope that will be a good choice for a newbe.

One thing I've discovered is just as with so many other woodworking tools, there is a bewildering variety of accessories - all promising to be just what the turner needs (LOL). I would welcome any advice on all the accessories to get: for example the Axminster AK100 seems to get high praises - is it a good choice for a new turner and for this machine? Are there competitors that might be as good or nearly as good but lower price? What about the turning tools? Acme Tools offers a nice 6 piece HSS set from Penn State. Is this a good starter set - not too expensive, but not junk either? Or should I bite the bullet and go ahead and get carbide tools? Is anyone using the Ultra-Sheer pen mandrel - if so what is you advice? If there are other tools that I should be considering, please let me know.

I'm looking forward to learning from this forum.
Glynn

Welcome to the AAW forum, Glynn. The Laguna REVO 12/16 is a very good lathe. Regarding the bewildering variety of accessories, don't hesitate to ask questions. I think that most of us have acquired tools that have become dust collectors. I'm still looking for the tool that will be my ticket to greatness.
 
Joined
Nov 11, 2021
Messages
3
Likes
1
Location
Auburn, AL
Welcome aboard. I cannot advise on the tools you have only tell you what I use and why.
I actually started with a mini set of Benjamin's Best, but quickly outgrew that. A set is not needed and I would suggest getting bowl gouge, parting tool, spindle gouge. Although I do have other tools these do maybe 80-90 % of the work. My choice for gouges is Thompson but again I do have others including Hunter carbides.
Chuck I use are all Super Nova 2. Had a Penn State Barracuda but I found it ti slip. The SN2 has a full range of jaws and if tenon is cut properly will work as good as any other chuck. They are cheaper than most . They have a new one called Super Nova 2 Pro Tek at 199 and looks like it replaces the SN2. The new one uses the same screw direction as all other chucks but SN2 tightens in opposite direction.
No matter what if you can buy at least better tools to start with
Hi Gerald
Thanks for the excellent advice - I do appreciate hearing from an experienced woodworker. I'm looking forward to learning from this forum.
Best wishes
Glynn
 
Joined
Nov 11, 2021
Messages
3
Likes
1
Location
Auburn, AL
Welcome Glynn. The Laguna lathe should serve you well.

Yes, not only is the accessory availability bewildering, there are several or many ways of doing the same thing, depending on who you talk to. Be sure to take advantage of all the article and video resources the AAW has available, they are all safety approved, unlike other resources. Find an AAW chapter as close as possible and visit them - many have mentor programs.

I have recently completed a beginner list of tools for our local chapter (it is only my opinion and other's opinions could be very different). Initially I recommend best value tools, as most folks have a limited budget. They function very well at a reasonable or even low price vs alternatives, especially cutting tools. I like Penn State Ind, but their are some other compatible brands.

Carbide tools - they offer more "instant gratification" and cheaper to get started, since you can use a diamond hone to freshen edges and dont need a grinder and jig. The down side is surface finish (lot more sanding) and you learn to use scraping vs floating the bevel.

If interested in the tools list send me a message in "conversations". It's an excel file I can't attach in this forum and is not formatted to just paste here.
Thanks Doug,
That is good advice about the pros and cons of carbide. I ordered a mid-grade level of HSS tools and may upgrade at some point in the future. Yes, I would like to get the tools list from you. Do you need my email address?
Best wishes
Glynn
 
Joined
Feb 26, 2019
Messages
715
Likes
441
Location
Lebanon, Missouri
Thanks Doug,
That is good advice about the pros and cons of carbide. I ordered a mid-grade level of HSS tools and may upgrade at some point in the future. Yes, I would like to get the tools list from you. Do you need my email address?
Best wishes
Glynn

Yes. I just checked and I cant send an excel file through conversations either.
 
Joined
Jul 26, 2016
Messages
2,080
Likes
941
Location
Nebraska
Every time I see Glynn Cavin post I think about having a glass of 30-year old Irish or Scotch single malt on ice. :)
Your name would make for a good trademark.
 
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