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Grain orientation on scoop

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May 4, 2010
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I really, really need to clear out some of my horde of wood. Now that the spindle blanks are dry, I decided to make a bunch of scoops, but have a dilemma: when I cut the side off to convert the 'goblet' into a scoop, should I cut the flat grain side or the edge grain side? Suggestions?

For example, here are three scoops (shown in an Etsy photo, not made by me) with the one on the left cut on the edge grain (A) and the one on the right cut on the flat grain (B). (The one in the middle was apparently cut during a hangover)

1622902528961.png
 
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I doubt there is a significant structural issue, but the one on the right will require lass sanding and might not be as porous.

But if they are blanks in spindle orientation there shouldn't be end grain on the cut surface?
 

hockenbery

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i have a similar dilemma for 3 sided napkin rings. Where to put the 3 faces.
I pick the prettiest grain for one face and let the other faces show whatever is there.

look at the scoop.
Either cut off any offensive defect or center the best grain opposite the cut.
more than likely you will cut away one face grain side.

this will be ever so slightly less likely to spilt if dropped onto a hard floor than a piece that has parallel grain lines when the side grain is centered.
that said a row of rays can look nice on a Cherry or oak scoop.
 
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It may be a choice dependent on the species so if it is something like the beach in the photo like oak then the quarter sawn look of the rays the left hand one is what I would go for. If the wood is something tight grain like Maple it probably does not matter.
Please tell me that you are not going to have a flat bottom similar to the ones in the photo!
 
Joined
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It may be a choice dependent on the species so if it is something like the beach in the photo like oak then the quarter sawn look of the rays the left hand one is what I would go for. If the wood is something tight grain like Maple it probably does not matter.
Please tell me that you are not going to have a flat bottom similar to the ones in the photo!
I hadn't noticed that--I just selected the picture as an illustration of what I was awkwardly trying to say. But now that you mention it, "Good Heavens, No!" Actually Richard Raffan mentions this in his projects book, and he is equally unhappy with drilling the insides. BTW, he introduces the topic by saying he had made 45,000 scoops and doing so was a major part of his income as a professional turner.
 
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