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Mustard Monster site

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Sorry, I have not been as diligent as I was when I inherited the Mustard Monster site https://mustardmonster.weebly.com/ from its founder Jerry Hall. I would be happy to talk with someone with a love of the Mustard Monster that would like to take it over. The links that do not work tend to be those that refer back to a site that has been taken down or redesigned. Most of the the links are to Google docs that work just fine.
 
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Mike,

I am interested. Will send you a PM.

Kind regards,
Rich
 
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I've taken a 1st pass at this, moving most of the documents to be PDFs which can be printed. Where there are links to web sites, especially forums, I've not gotten them all fixed yet.

You can see it now at: MustardMonster.ColvinTools.com.

Love to get feedback on ways to make it better.
 
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Thanks Rich, I am a new member but have been turning awhile and own a 16 year old 3520B that I bought new. I was looking at the remote shutoff switch article on the site and I am going to try to put one of the magnets on the back of my DPST switch I want to put in line to the VFD that I just replaced, to be able to take it out of service when not using the lathe. I realize I will have two heavier lines to the switch which I can support with zip ties under the bed as I want to put this switch on the tailstock end of the lathe. This can act as an emergency shut-off switch if needed. I need this on a magnet as I have the bed extension and have not used it in the lower position so don't know where the switch can be located to always be out of the way, may never have a permanent location. Again, thanks for getting this site up and running!
 
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Looks real nice and great to have available. When I click on blue items in a pdf, I am not taken to the linked site. Probably this isn't possible from a pdf, but it is somewhat of a surprise. Maybe a note on the opening page to explain what will and won't work, how to do a work around (cut and paste in this case), and possibly an offer to accept feedback on broken links or items no longer available.

Considering we're on our third Powermatic vfd replacement this year among members in our local club, we've made considerable use of the references we have identified on the forum, such as the Doc Green pages. These would be a worthy addition to the Mustard Monster site. I bet there are other forum threads and recommended links/sites that we could identify for inclusion. I would be happy to help in any effort to update the site, even though I don't have the expertise for maintaining a web site.
 
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Rich,
Glad you stepped up! While this site is aimed at Powermatic owners it has proven to be an excellent source of information for those of us that have the larger Jet lathes. I’m an owner of a Jet 1642 an used the tutorial for adding a remote to my lathe. Also followed the instructions for a swing away tailstock.
 

Bill Boehme

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Rich, here is how to fix all of the old broken links to threads on the AAW forum before June 27, 2016, when we were using vBulletin forum software. For example on page 2 of your PDF link above, about midpage, the paragraph that begins with, "Can I move it by myself?" There is an old broken link: http://www.aawforum.org/vbforum/showthread.php?t=3389

Do the following steps:
  • Replace "/vbforum/" with "/community/".
  • Replace "showthread.php?t=3389/" with "threads/3389/".
After you finish editing, you will have:
http://www.aawforum.org/community/threads/3389/

When you click on this updated link, the desired page will open, and the thread URL in the address bar will include keywords from the thread title as follows:
https://www.aawforum.org/community/threads/setting-up-a-pm-3520b.3389/

While it isn't mandatory to include SEO keywords (search engine optimization, basically the keywords in the thread title) to the "slug" of the URL it can be helpful in case of a broken link in the future.

Yes, you can have clickable links in a PDF document.
 
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Bill,

Thank you: I will make those updates over the next week or so (still have that dreaded job).

Kind regards,
Rich
 
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Thanks Rich, I am a new member but have been turning awhile and own a 16 year old 3520B that I bought new. I was looking at the remote shutoff switch article on the site and I am going to try to put one of the magnets on the back of my DPST switch I want to put in line to the VFD that I just replaced, to be able to take it out of service when not using the lathe. I realize I will have two heavier lines to the switch which I can support with zip ties under the bed as I want to put this switch on the tailstock end of the lathe. This can act as an emergency shut-off switch if needed. I need this on a magnet as I have the bed extension and have not used it in the lower position so don't know where the switch can be located to always be out of the way, may never have a permanent location. Again, thanks for getting this site up and running!
Note the remote cut off will kill the motor but the VFD will still have power so it is important when out of the shop to either unplug or use a throw switch (not the correct term but someone will correct) . You do not want to throw the panel breaker for this as it will weaken the breaker in time and is not its intended purpose.
 
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Gerald, I bought a single throw double pole 20 amp switch to put on the two incoming lines to the VFD from the 220 volt supply plug. Switch was about six dollars at home depot. As I stated above, being on the tail stock end, it can act as an emergency switch if needed. So far I have not needed a switch down there. Every time something came off the lathe, a piece of sycamore too close to the pith or a piece of bark, it had already bounced its path to eventually the floor by the time I could have reacted by tripping a switch, probably cursing myself now by stating this......
 
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Gerald, I bought a single throw double pole 20 amp switch to put on the two incoming lines to the VFD from the 220 volt supply plug. Switch was about six dollars at home depot. As I stated above, being on the tail stock end, it can act as an emergency switch if needed. So far I have not needed a switch down there. Every time something came off the lathe, a piece of sycamore too close to the pith or a piece of bark, it had already bounced its path to eventually the floor by the time I could have reacted by tripping a switch, probably cursing myself now by stating this......
Marvin, that switch will not stop the lathe that fast in an emergency situation. Best to use a switch connected in series with the red stop switch. It can be mounted remotely and will use the breaking feature of the VFD.
Larry
 
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So the braking resistor circuit is somehow connected to the emergency stop button, interesting. I was wondering about that. My effort at this time is not so much the emergency stop but to put an inline switch on supply to the VFD. I have the VFD programmed to shut it's cooling fan off when the stop button is pushed in but I don't want to wear out that button. After installing the switch I can change the fan to run until switch is activated, which will remind me to turn it off.
I will look into the remote emergency shutoff as soon as I get the permanent wiring and switch installed.
Thanks Gerald and Larry for the information!
 
Last edited:
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I read the article again and the next trip to the hardware store or the big box store, I'll pick up a switch. Kind of bothers me that most of the switches either safety or regular switches are rated for the full 120 or 240 volt and the voltage to the stop button is in the teens. I have plenty of the red 14 gage extension cord wire so I'll have a remote switch installed before long. When I say I lengthened the stop time, it was not but by a couple of seconds so it still stops much quicker than without the brake. I have an idea on another way to modify a switch and will include a picture when complete....I think that before I settle for the best place to put this switch and my knack for breaking things, it will hit the floor at least once so my plan is to make it able to withstand the fall.....
 
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Rich, here is how to fix all of the old broken links to threads on the AAW forum before June 27, 2016, when we were using vBulletin forum software. For example on page 2 of your PDF link above, about midpage, the paragraph that begins with, "Can I move it by myself?" There is an old broken link: http://www.aawforum.org/vbforum/showthread.php?t=3389

Do the following steps:
  • Replace "/vbforum/" with "/community/".
  • Replace "showthread.php?t=3389/" with "threads/3389/".
After you finish editing, you will have:
http://www.aawforum.org/community/threads/3389/

When you click on this updated link, the desired page will open, and the thread URL in the address bar will include keywords from the thread title as follows:
https://www.aawforum.org/community/threads/setting-up-a-pm-3520b.3389/

While it isn't mandatory to include SEO keywords (search engine optimization, basically the keywords in the thread title) to the "slug" of the URL it can be helpful in case of a broken link in the future.

Yes, you can have clickable links in a PDF document.

Bill,

Thank you. I think all the PDFs have been updated to reflect this properly. If anyone sees any problems, kindly let me know.

Kind regards,
Rich
 

Bill Boehme

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So the braking resistor circuit is somehow connected to the emergency stop button, interesting. I was wondering about that. My effort at this time is not so much the emergency stop but to put an inline switch on supply to the VFD. I have the VFD programmed to shut it's cooling fan off when the stop button is pushed in but I don't want to wear out that button. After installing the switch I can change the fan to run until switch is activated, which will remind me to turn it off. I will look into the remote emergency shutoff as soon as I get the permanent wiring and switch installed. Thanks Gerald and Larry for the information!

Marvin, the braking resistor sometimes used on inverters is not part of the emergency stop function per se as it is a component in the motor deceleration function. Basically, the resistor comes into play when the lathe operator rapidly turns the speed control down or when the "stop" button or switch is activated and the motor ramps to a stop following the user selected profile. The purpose of the resistor is to dissipate the energy from the motor's collapsing magnetic field which would otherwise be dissipated as heat in the motor's windings. In general, a braking resistor isn't needed for a woodturning lathe unless the motor is being very heavily loaded to maximum capacity and making frequent stops.

The remote stop switch accessory for the PM3520B toggles a logic input to the inverter. Only a few milliamperes of current flows through the switch so the proper type of switch for that function is known as a "dry circuit" switch. Powermatic doesn't use the correct type of switch and that is part of the reason for the high failure rate of that switch. The remote stop switch activates the same ramp down function as the switch on headstock.

If you want to put a DPST switch in the mains to the inverter as an "emergency" stop switch then there won't be any braking and the lathe will simply freewheel to a stop which could take quite a while to stop if there is a very heavy hunk of wood spinning. If you decide to add this type of power switch, I think it would be a good idea to use a large red mushroom pushbutton switch rather than a toggle switch. This type of switch can be really useful when the normal ramp down to a stop is liable to result in the chuck or faceplate unscrewing.
 
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Great information and thanks! The purpose of the switch I'm installing is to protect the new VFD I installed. The lathe was always connected to power prior replacing the drive so I guess a 16 year run was not too bad. I was stating the location of the switch, if located near the tailstock could act as an emergency off switch. After reading Larry's reply and the remote safety switch installation article again, I've decided to install one of those as well. I can go ahead and mount the power switch permanently on the wall near the tailstock as it will be easier to reach over and turn it off when leaving the lathe.
I'm not an electrician nor have a much of an electronically inclined mind, have more of a mechanic mentality so was able to replace and program the VFD with John Coppola's article in the tricks and tips section. I was truly wondering how that resistor slowed the lathe down so thank you for insight as to it's function. I did add a few seconds of time to the slow down function of lathe as did John when he installed his. My chuck has only become unseated very few times when I did not insure it were snug and would get in a hurry with the potentiometer.
I mentioned above that I knew the current was less than normal household current to the emergency switch and have concerns that the switches mentioned in the article appear to be for normal 120 volt service. I wasn't sure if I could spec out a switch rated for the current draw of the switch, or was it really a needed concern. I figured a switch is either on or off and they appear to be working for others, your thoughts? I have not purchased the switch for the remote yet. Thanks again.
 
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Great information and thanks! The purpose of the switch I'm installing is to protect the new VFD I installed. The lathe was always connected to power prior replacing the drive so I guess a 16 year run was not too bad. I was stating the location of the switch, if located near the tailstock could act as an emergency off switch. After reading Larry's reply and the remote safety switch installation article again, I've decided to install one of those as well. I can go ahead and mount the power switch permanently on the wall near the tailstock as it will be easier to reach over and turn it off when leaving the lathe.
I'm not an electrician nor have a much of an electronically inclined mind, have more of a mechanic mentality so was able to replace and program the VFD with John Coppola's article in the tricks and tips section. I was truly wondering how that resistor slowed the lathe down so thank you for insight as to it's function. I did add a few seconds of time to the slow down function of lathe as did John when he installed his. My chuck has only become unseated very few times when I did not insure it were snug and would get in a hurry with the potentiometer.
I mentioned above that I knew the current was less than normal household current to the emergency switch and have concerns that the switches mentioned in the article appear to be for normal 120 volt service. I wasn't sure if I could spec out a switch rated for the current draw of the switch, or was it really a needed concern. I figured a switch is either on or off and they appear to be working for others, your thoughts? I have not purchased the switch for the remote yet. Thanks again.
Just one thing, if you are primarily interested in protecting the VFD electronics, a disconnect switch isn't going to do that unless it also disconnects neutral (and ground for 120v circuit) - as long as there's any electrical path to the lathe, it can be affected by a surge. (neutral is bonded to the grounding bus at the breaker panel in most cases) - only way to fully protect is to unplug, or your switch needs to actually disconnect all 3 wires (black red white, or black white ground) My shop has been hit by lightning twice (not direct hits but closest was less than 30 Ft. from where I was standing when it hit a tree) and both times it fried not only the shop's computer, (and printer and credit card machine too) but also fried the power supply and motherboard in another backup computer that was plugged in to an unpowered circuit (breaker was turned off on that circuit pending a new wiring run that I planned to put through) I assume a VFD's electronics while maybe more robust may be affected in the same way, so lesson learned, if you want it protected, unplug it, it isn't enough to just have the circuit breaker turned off. I'm considering the possibility of getting a whole-house surge suppressor (one that hooks right in at the breaker panel) but not sure if even that would help in the case of lightning strikes nearby (since lightning's surge can feed back through anything touching the ground, unless lathe sits on isolator mounts)
 

Bill Boehme

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Just one thing, if you are primarily interested in protecting the VFD electronics, a disconnect switch isn't going to do that unless it also disconnects neutral (and ground for 120v circuit) - as long as there's any electrical path to the lathe, it can be affected by a surge. (neutral is bonded to the grounding bus at the breaker panel in most cases) - only way to fully protect is to unplug, or your switch needs to actually disconnect all 3 wires (black red white, or black white ground) My shop has been hit by lightning twice (not direct hits but closest was less than 30 Ft. from where I was standing when it hit a tree) and both times it fried not only the shop's computer, (and printer and credit card machine too) but also fried the power supply and motherboard in another backup computer that was plugged in to an unpowered circuit (breaker was turned off on that circuit pending a new wiring run that I planned to put through) I assume a VFD's electronics while maybe more robust may be affected in the same way, so lesson learned, if you want it protected, unplug it, it isn't enough to just have the circuit breaker turned off. I'm considering the possibility of getting a whole-house surge suppressor (one that hooks right in at the breaker panel) but not sure if even that would help in the case of lightning strikes nearby (since lightning's surge can feed back through anything touching the ground, unless lathe sits on isolator mounts)

Neutral is a 120-volt circuit current-carrying conductor. There is no neutral conductor in a 240-volt circuit. Ground is not a current-carrying conductor and is not connected to any electrical/electronic component. Ground is connected to the metal frame or metal enclosure. In the case of a lathe or other stationary woodworking machine, the metal structure is grounded to protect the operator in case some internal failure causes current to flow on the ground conductor. There should always be a ground conductor to any machine with a metal frame. No disconnect switch will be any match for a close lightning strike. For a lightning strike directly to your home or shop even unplugging won't always ensure that sensitive electronics will survive.
 
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Neutral is a 120-volt circuit current-carrying conductor. There is no neutral conductor in a 240-volt circuit.
Actually there is, but I was thinking of a 50 amp dryer circuit (that I had to re-wire a few years back) - 4 wires: red, black (the 2 hot wires), white (yes ,a neutral) and ground... Dug around a little bit, and yes, the 240v 20 amp circuit (which I am assuming is common to the 240v lathes) does only need the 2 hot wires, and ground of course... Forewarned is forearmed, I guess, since I eventually (if and when I can scrape together the 3 grand or so for the Jet 1840 I settled on as a compromise between what I want (Sweet 16) vs the best I can actually maybe afford (and willing to buy).. so I'm sure I'll be more well-read when that day arrives that I wire in my new 240v 20amp circuit (currently there's an unused old-style 60 amp 240v that was put in for an arc welder back in 1986, for which I plan to re-purpose that breaker panel slot..)

But yeah, lightning, is a bit extreme of an example, but I'm fairly sure even a heavy power surge can be capable of back-feeding (and if the voltage backfeeding through a grounding wire is powerful enough it still could damage sensitive electronics, IMHO... much like reverse polarity hookup of a battery can blow out the voltage regulator in some types of car alternators) Hence, my recommendation to just unplug, which is simpler and more effective)
 

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Your dryer example as well as some ovens and ranges have both 120 and 240-volt circuits, but the neutral wire is only used by the 120-volt circuits. The 240 volt part of the dryer is normally just the heating element and no neutral.

I have a four-wire cable to my Robust American Beauty, but that's only because I have a 120-volt power strip attached to the lathe for accessories such as lighting and occasionally a drill, sander, or router. It's just more convenient than having a mess of wires on the floor.
 
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When I was a young man we rented an grand old old farmhouse that when the kitchen was plumbed, the hot water heater and the sink was on one wall and the plumbing was exposed (work completed way before we lived there). I was standing in the doorway to the hall during a lightening storm when a bolt hit the house. Besides the clap that made me drop to my knees, fire was jumping from the plumbing to the phone and to different points of the plumbing. I was amazed because apparently the only damage was the phone which was plastic the little metal pieces in it caused it to change shape from the heat and of coarse the marks left on the pipe but no leaks. Looking on the roof afterward, I noticed the farmer who had the house built had these tall lightening rods installed on each end and what appeared to be 1" thick bare interwoven copper wire connecting the rods then the wire ran down to the ground to a buried rod right next to, yea, the exposed vent stack on the kitchen wall. We moved shortly after that and the house burned down a little later. I just can't figure out how or why it took so long for this to happen. The rods and wire looked very old.
That said, if by some chance lightening hit our house wiring which comes in underground, a switch, a disconnect, even unplugged with the plugs laying close to each other fire would jump that little distance if everything was right for it to happen, I can attest to that.....so basically I am wanting the VFD to not receive power all the time under normal circumstances. My lathe feed is 2 124 volt legs and a ground, according to my fluke. I'm going to risk it and install a double pole single throw switch on the two hot legs then install a remote emergency stop to hit as I run by it.......
 

Bill Boehme

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Bill,

Thank you. I think all the PDFs have been updated to reflect this properly. If anyone sees any problems, kindly let me know.

Kind regards,
Rich

@RichColvin, I thought it would be nice if the links in the PDF were clickable so I updated the document on setting up and moving the Powermatic 3520 for the links that are still good (mostly AAW and Sawmill Creek forum links). I also updated the permalinks with keywords where applicable to make the links more future-proof. It looks like somebody made a typo on one of the AAW forum links because the thread number is too large. If you still have the original document please check the link to see if the thread number is different.

Here is my edited version including comments where I found a problem. I just noticed that I missed a couple of the links.
 

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.....so basically I am wanting the VFD to not receive power all the time under normal circumstances. My lathe feed is 2 124 volt legs and a ground, according to my fluke. I'm going to risk it and install a double pole single throw switch on the two hot legs then install a remote emergency stop to hit as I run by it.......
That should work, I would imagine. Pretty much just installing a second circuit breaker near to where you can access it.

Odds of getting a lightning strike, I'd say are pretty small (even though I been "bit" twice in a matter of 6 years between them.. maybe I should buy lottery tickets?), so all I was trying to point out with that was, knowing (and seeing a 18 inch arc while watching a utility lineman hook a line back together) what electricity can do, a simple switch is not gonna protect electronics circuitry from a strong power surge (which can be far more likely than a lightning strike) - If they made a 240v 30 amp surge suppressor you could put in between the outlet and the lathe, someone'd probably make a mint... and they DO make whole house surge suppressors (as I mentioned in earlier thread) which might achieve the same or similar result (and also protect household electronics to boot) for a 120v lathe, maybe easier what with the availability of 120v surge suppressors (though you want to be sure it has the amps rating to handle the lathe)
 
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@RichColvin, I thought it would be nice if the links in the PDF were clickable so I updated the document on setting up and moving the Powermatic 3520 for the links that are still good (mostly AAW and Sawmill Creek forum links). I also updated the permalinks with keywords where applicable to make the links more future-proof. It looks like somebody made a typo on one of the AAW forum links because the thread number is too large. If you still have the original document please check the link to see if the thread number is different.

Here is my edited version including comments where I found a problem. I just noticed that I missed a couple of the links.
Bill,

Thank you: it is uploaded and online now.

Kind regards,
Rich
 
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