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Oneway Coring System

Emiliano Achaval

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I ordered the Oneway coring system. The package was stuck at the customs office in Chicago for over a month. Finally got it a few days ago. I have been using the McNaughton system for over 20 years. I was always curious about the Oneway. I also ordered the new Korpro cartridges with a carbide tip from Hunter tools. I had 3 large curly Koa bowls ready to core. I used the Vicmarc VM150 on all 3, with 6 in jaws. I started with the standard cutting tips from Oneway. I assumed there were sharp, from the factory, they looked shiny enough. Well, I guess they do not sharpen them, or not enough, or not as good as what I can do. I was disappointed, to say the least with how it was cutting, or scraping, as Robo told me. I then sharpened it, and that made a big difference. Switched to the Korpro. What a difference! Huge shavings flying out. I only core nice pieces of Koa, or that special curly mango. The Koa that I cored if you were to buy it goes for $150 per BF. The blank is well over $500. The money bowl, when finished is a $1500 bowl. I got one $600 bowl and one $300 out of it. In just 2 hours of work, I made enough cores to pay for the system and the cartridges. I got the complete 4 blades system. It wasn't any faster than the McNaugton, but, it was definitely less strenous to use. The third bowl was a bit too shallow, so I had to core with the McNaughton. That is one limitation of the Oneway, the depth. I figured it out what shape bowl the Oneway likes. Next I'm going to make a extra large Milo natural edge bowl and I will try to take out as many as I can, hoping for a minimum of 4, maybe 5 for the nested set. I'm a beginer Oneway user, any tips that you have are greatly appreciated.
 
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Emiliano if you could get Chris Ramsey to come over for a demo he could really open your eyes as to the Oneway Coring System. After I saw him core a burl and get 9 cores (and I think he could have gotten 2 or 3 more out of it) I got rid of the McNaughton and the Woodcut Bowl Saver. The Oneway is so much more versatile than you think. And I see that you found out about the Korpro. It is really worth every penny and is really a difference maker. I spent two days in Chris' studio and not counting the 2 hats what I learned about the Oneway Coring System was worth the cost of the trip alone for me.
 
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My tip is that using a laser measuring system can be very helpful for getting precise thicknesses on the bottom of the cores. Not so important if you're making thick cores for returning. But helpful if you're doing once turned NE bowls.

The laser set up is similar to what is done for measuring wall thickness on a hollowing rig: a vertical post goes in the hole that holds the coring knife. A horizontal arm extends from that. A laser pointer on the arm points downward. Calibrate/mark the arm so you can position the laser pointing right at the outside edge of the cutter. Then use the laser to position the base to get the bowl bottom thickness you want.

The process above assumes you are working from the outside in, i.e. cutting the largest core first.
 
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My tip is that using a laser measuring system can be very helpful for getting precise thicknesses on the bottom of the cores. Not so important if you're making thick cores for returning. But helpful if you're doing once turned NE bowls.

The laser set up is similar to what is done for measuring wall thickness on a hollowing rig: a vertical post goes in the hole that holds the coring knife. A horizontal arm extends from that. A laser pointer on the arm points downward. Calibrate/mark the arm so you can position the laser pointing right at the outside edge of the cutter. Then use the laser to position the base to get the bowl bottom thickness you want.

The process above assumes you are working from the outside in, i.e. cutting the largest core first.
David, Please post some pics when you have a chance. Is the laser on a pivot, or is it locked in place to follow the cutter tip as it cuts into the wood?
 

Emiliano Achaval

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Emiliano if you could get Chris Ramsey to come over for a demo he could really open your eyes as to the Oneway Coring System. After I saw him core a burl and get 9 cores (and I think he could have gotten 2 or 3 more out of it) I got rid of the McNaughton and the Woodcut Bowl Saver. The Oneway is so much more versatile than you think. And I see that you found out about the Korpro. It is really worth every penny and is really a difference maker. I spent two days in Chris' studio and not counting the 2 hats what I learned about the Oneway Coring System was worth the cost of the trip alone for me.
Chris Ramsey has invited me to his place, and I have invited him over. Hopefully soon! Thank you Bill!
 
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You might still be crazy but the tips are dull. After reading your comments and Bill's on the Korpro I ordered two from Mike Hunter.($408). If they're not as good as y'all say they are, I'll send you a bill for reimbursement.
 

Randy Anderson

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I switched to the carbide OneWay cutters and they're certainly better but likely no where near as good as the ones you're using. Not sure if you plan to do many natural edge bowls but if you do be careful. The support finger can get bound up and/or catch as it goes from open air to a wing on the bowl. I've had it happen a couple of times. It's not pretty when it does. I have a post here about my experiences with it.


I'd like to be able to justify the different cutters for it but, that's tough math to make work in my market.
 

Emiliano Achaval

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I switched to the carbide OneWay cutters and they're certainly better but likely no where near as good as the ones you're using. Not sure if you plan to do many natural edge bowls but if you do be careful. The support finger can get bound up and/or catch as it goes from open air to a wing on the bowl. I've had it happen a couple of times. It's not pretty when it does. I have a post here about my experiences with it.


I'd like to be able to justify the different cutters for it but, that's tough math to make work in my market.
I wasn't aware of the NE catches, thanks!
 
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David, Please post some pics when you have a chance. Is the laser on a pivot, or is it locked in place to follow the cutter tip as it cuts into the wood?

The laser and the cutter are not in the tool at the same time. The laser is used before the cutter. It's used to set the position of the base. Once the base is locked in place, the laser is removed and replaced with the cutting knife.

Here's a picture, staged, since I'm not coring right now.
Laser.jpg

The laser mechanism uses the same hole in the base that the cutting knife uses. You can see that I have marks on the laser support arm for the different sized knives. To mark the arm, I first put a live center in headstock, then put the 9" knife in the base, then moved the base so the outer edge of the cutter just touched the tip of the live center, then locked down the base. This is also a good time to adjust the height of the cutter so it's at or just barely above center. Next I removed the knife, inserted the laser and adjusted the position on the arm until the laser just touched the tip of the live center and marked the position on the arm. Repeat for the other sized knives and you're good to go.

To use the laser, set the arm to match the size knife you're going to use, turn on the laser and move the base until it's positioned to get the cut you want. You can shine directly on the wood, but for me, it's hard to tell thickness on a curved surface. So I modified a technique that Robo Hippy teaches for measuring thickness on the bottom of bowls.

1. Measure the distance from the headstock to the face of the chuck jaws. You can see in the picture that it's 4 3/8" in this case (written on the chuck).
2. Figure out the bottom thickness you want and add to the jaw distance. In this case 1/2" thickness + 4 3/8" = 4 7/8"
3. Put a ruler against the headstock and move the base until the laser hits 4 7/8".
4. Check the wall thickness at the rim of the bowl and move base if necessary.
5. Repeat step 3 and 4 until you get the thicknesses you want at both the rim and bottom.
6. Lock down the base, remove the laser, insert the knife and cut your core.

It sounds like a lot of steps, but once you get your chucks measured and the laser arm calibrated, it's very quick to use. And I've found it to be very accurate; the bottom thicknesses match within about 1/16" of what I set out to do.

A couple more points:
1. This procedure is for cutting cores from the outside in, i.e. making the biggest core first. It won't work if you start with the smallest core first.
2. Moving the base perpendicular to the bed of the lathe, like you do to adjust wall thickness at the rim, also makes a small change to the bottom thickness. And vice versa. So you have to cycle thru steps 3 and 4 a couple of times if you're trying to get very precise thicknesses at both places.
 
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To me, the reason the Oneway tips feel dull is because, as I have said before, all the coring systems are scrapers, and scrapers cut best with a burr. When you sharpen the top surface only and not the face of the bevel, you have no burr.

I have cored some natural edge bowls with the McNaughton, and the sphincter tightening is always higher with the NE bowls than with standard bowls. I would probably feel the same way with the Oneway. I would think catches would be more from feeding in too fast rather than an inherent problem with NE vs regular bowls. Don't know for sure though.

robo hippy
 

hockenbery

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would think catches would be more from feeding in too fast rather than an inherent problem with NE vs regular bowls. Don't know for sure though.
I think that is right on.
I have seen Mike Mahoney core natural edge pieces in at least 3 demos.
he got 11-14 bowls each time.

the trick is the same as hollowing with a gouge. Each bark cut is an 2 entry cuts per revolution.
once below the bark all aroun
tools have to be fed slowly enough on the interrupted cut to not cut deeper into the air than you are cutting into the wood.
I think a smooth interrupted cut is the most difficult thing to master in woodturning.

by the way Mike stacks the deck in his favor by coring burl caps In the demos.
less deviation in the bark surface than a 1/2 log
and no endgrain to cut into at the bottom of the core.
 
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I use a laser made for the Monster Hollowing System. Had a round bar drilled and tapped so the Monster laser screws into that. Then put into the Oneway base and extend laser to length of knife being used.
 
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Bill, any way you could post a couple of pics of the Monster Laser with your Onewaycoring setup? I have both the articulating Monster rig, and the Oneway coring setup [new] so, I’d like to see how you set it up. Thanks!
 
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Sorry it took so long but here is a quick mockup of how I have it. Adjust the laser to the length of the blade being used.
 

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Hmm, I always just used plywood cut outs for the different blades. I made rectangles so one side for one blade and the other side/orientation for another blade. They were set so the cutter would leave the bottom 1/2 inch thick. Didn't see the need for a laser. I believe the instructions came with the coring system, but 'individual results/chucks may vary'...

robo hippy
 
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You can change the angle of the sides of the cut by a limited degree by shifting the cutter side to side as long as you keep the depth or distance from the headstock the same. Moving it closer to the bed center gives you a bit steeper sided bowl with a bit smaller diameter. Pulling back has the opposite effect of a bit shallower and wider looking cut. This will also create a slight rise in center as the point of the arm missed center at the bottom of the swing. I like the smaller size for the steeper sides making a deeper looking bowl proportionally. Wouldnt mind if the adjustment slot was a bit longer to allow even more reduction in diameter so I could cut a steeper curve into the wood.
 
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I took a class with Chris Ramsey and the first thing I wanted to see was him coring with the Oneway Coring System, what an eye opener! When folks say that the Oneway is not as versatile they have not seen Chris coring. He took 9 cores out of a burl (very quickly and I honestly believe that he could have easily taken 3 or 4 more). That year at the Cincinnati symposium Chris had the finished bowls there.
 

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