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Rough turning green crotch figures

Joined
Nov 30, 2021
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Portland, OR
I have several green cherry crotch figures between 7 and 15 inches in diameter (after rounding and
Balancing). For the thicker blanks, should I remove some of the wood from the center to speed up drying, or leave a uniform thicknesses? The pits are turned away. I am concerned about drying time vs yield. I prefer to not need to fill cracks with epoxy or add butterflies.

Thanks.

Danny
 

hockenbery

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I usually single turn them as a NE bowl. Cherry sap ring makes a spectacular heart shaped bowl.
See this thread for tip and a video of a demo

I also slab crotches 1.5 - 2” thick and dry the slab for platters. Expect 2” checking loss on each end and year + drying time.
 
Last edited:
Joined
Feb 28, 2021
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Roulette, PA
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www.reallyruralwoodworks.com
Well, if you have them already cut into blanks, and want to minimize warping I'd twice-turn , and rough them out into the approximate shape you want them, leaving them thick but consistent thickness, and let them dry, but as Hockenberry does , I would probably once-turn them to a final thickness and do natural edge.. I just did one in Walnut green once-turned - my first attempt at doing an emerging bowl, just finished it today and I expect it is going to crack and warp.. but how much is what remains to be seen .. (I just noticed in the second picture what looks like tool marks.. re-checking the bowl, it is actually curl - as in like curly maple)
 

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Randy Anderson

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I single turn all my natural edge bowls. I don't use the tenon for a foot and the bottom of all mine look like the attached pick when I put them in the bag to dry. A shallow tenon is best to reduce cracking risk. The tenon will often go egg shaped a bit and the bottom will warp by curving inward toward the side grain. I leave enough material on the planned foot to finish it off flat and put a concave shape inside the foot area. It can be tricky sometimes to reshape the foot to the curve and be flat but it bugs me to have a bowl not sit flat when first done. Careful work with a gouge, a NR scraper and some sanding and you can get the foot to blend in. That said, a natural edge once turned bowl may sit perfectly flat in some times of the year and have a very slight wobble other parts of the year. It's wood. It moves.
 

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Joined
Feb 26, 2019
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Lebanon, Missouri
Like others I 1 turn NE crotch bowls to ~1/4” and let them warp. Thin warps, thick cracks. I rough out platters and leave them a bit thicker than 10% and slow dry. Takes a long time to dry them. Also make a lot of 1-turn hollow forms from crotches.
 
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Brian, does your emerging bowl set flat on the table?
The bottom is turned with a bit of an arc to it so it is supported more by the corners of the "flat" wood as it sits right now, there is about 1/8" or air space between the bottom of the bowl portion and the table top. It remains to be seen if that increases (which I suspect it may as the wood dries and warps, but which way it goes is a guess) - So, hopefully (and as I planned for it) it sort of sits on the points of the corners... for now Also the little bit of "bottom" of the bowl that I formed on the bottom side I managed to get just right so when you hold it up to look, it actually looks like the bowl is "sunk" through the flat wood...
 
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